From the monthly archives: June 2014

Requisition Title: Lecturer – Film and Media Studies – 1401146
Job Field: Limited Term (Lecturer)
Faculty / Division: Faculty of Arts and Science
Department: Cinema Studies Institute
Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto)
Job Posting: Jun 9, 2014
Job Closing: Jul 10, 2014

Description:

The University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute (at Innis College) invites applications for a three-year limited-term teaching-stream appointment at the rank of Lecturer to begin August 1, 2014 or shortly thereafter and end June 30, 2017.

The Cinema Studies Institute is seeking applicants with extensive knowledge of film and media studies. The successful candidate will teach courses in cinema and related media at the undergraduate level in the Cinema Studies Institute (CSI). Ideally, the candidate will be equipped to teach courses currently offered by the Institute, a listing of which appears on the Institute website [http://www.utoronto.ca/cinema/undergradcourses.html]. Candidates must demonstrate evidence of excellence in teaching and have at least three years of experience teaching at the post-secondary level. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in Cinema Studies (or a related discipline) by time of appointment or shortly thereafter.

In particular, the candidate should have experience teaching larger, lecture-based survey courses and supervising teaching assistants. Areas that the candidate should have expertise in teaching include: introductory film analysis, film history, film theory, American cinema, and cinema and technology. While this position requires general knowledge of the fundamentals of film and media studies, candidates should also demonstrate specialization in an area that would complement CSI’s current course offerings.

Salary to be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

All qualified candidates are invited to apply online through the following link https://utoronto.taleo.net/careersection/10050/jobdetail.ftl?job=1401146 . Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply .We recommend combining documentation into one or two files in PDF/MS Word format.

Applications should include:

1) a cover letter of no more than two single-spaced pages, and containing a concise articulation of the candidate’s teaching philosophy;
2) a curriculum vitae;
3) a teaching dossier containing a list of courses taught, course syllabi, and teaching evaluations;
4) an example of published scholarship not exceeding twenty pages.

Candidates should also arrange to have three letters of recommendation focusing on their teaching abilities sent directly to cinema.studies@utoronto.ca .

The deadline for applications is July 10, 2014.

For more information about the Cinema Studies Institute, please consult http://www.utoronto.ca/cinema .
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given
priority.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes
applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, members
of sexual minority groups, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

 

SYNOPTIQUE Call For Papers

OUT OF THE DARK STACKS AND INTO THE LIGHT:

RE-VIEWING THE MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE FOR THE 21st CENTURY

 

The archive, as a concept, an action, and a physical repository of historical traces and material fragments, has a central place within contemporary film and moving image studies. The archive is not only a location for historical research; it also functions as a source of images and materials to be mined by filmmakers and media artists. Many studies of the archive have focused on these two dominant approaches to the use and formulation of moving image archives, especially in studies of documentary and avant-garde compilation or found footage cinema. Increasingly, film and media scholars are also turning to the archive to revise histories of film theory, film production, and its distribution and circulation, especially in post-colonial, historiographical, and transnational film scholarship. As such, the archive becomes as much a site of struggle and contested histories, as it is a site of creative inspiration and cultural preservation.

 

With the transnational and global turn in film scholarship, a greater analysis of the circulation and display of archival materials and moving images is necessary to understand how archival access might impact the current assessment of global and local shifts. In this special issue on the moving image archive, we wish to focus on both the sites of archival preservation and display of moving images (including museums, art galleries, institutional archives, private collections, and the Internet), as well as the circulatory and creative networks that connect them. In doing so, we intend to bring questions of circulation and exhibition into dialogue with the archive, in addition to a focus on the archive as a concept and method of artistic practice.

 

Submissions may include, but are not by any means limited to, topics such as:

  • Archival preservation, access, technologies, and practice
  • Archive as concept or methodology (landscape as archive, Internet archive, etc.)
  • Archival images in experimental films, videos, and games (compilation, found footage, database films, etc.)
  • Archives, gesture, sound, and performance
  • Digital archives and digitalization of archival materials
  • Documentary and the evidentiary uses of archival moving images
  • Colonial and postcolonial archives
  • Community organizations and archival display
  • Critiques of archival theory, media studies theory, and film theory
  • Global flows and circulation of archival materials and images
  • Institutional histories of a specific archive
  • New media, remix cultures, and the archive
  • Queer and feminist archives
  • Spaces of display and archival practice (museums, non-theatrical spaces, online databases, etc.)

 

Essay submissions for the peer-review section should be approximately 15-30 pages including the bibliography (maximum 7,500 words), and formatted according to MLA guidelines. This special issue is invested in exploring the archive in all its conceptual and practical manifestations, so we also welcome shorter pieces (2-8 pages, maximum 2,000 words) related to archival images or practice for our non-peer review section. This section includes conference or exhibition reports, book reviews, research creation pieces related to archival images or practice (including video essays, photograph series, and other digital projects accompanied by an explanatory text), and interviews with artists or archival practitioners.

 

All submissions must be in either French or English. Papers should be submitted by October 10, 2014. A link on www.synoptique.ca will guide you through the submission process. Feel free to contact us with any questions you may have at: editor.synoptique@gmail.com.

 

Please note the following two job postings on the WLU Faculty of Arts website (below):

http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=317&p=3142 (click on Faculty of Arts, click through to page 4). 

Click to download PDFs

Wilfrid Laurier Job #1 (The business of film)

Wilfrid Laurier Job #2 (Screenwriting and directing)