***la version française suit***

The Neutral is excited to announce the call for papers for issue #2 on the theme of  Period. We hope you will distribute this call to graduate students and interested faculty. Please see text below or attached PDF (French translation included). Please email submissions to theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com by June 30, 2019.

 
The Neutral is a new, peer-reviewed media studies journal based out of the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. The Neutral is committed to a diversity of disciplinary approaches and media objects of study. It is published online at: www.theneutraljournal.com
 
Call for Papers: PERIOD
The Neutral Journal
University of Toronto
Period.
A special issue on Environmental Media and Punctuation.
 
A period is a temporal marker: it designates both the span of a duration and the instant of an end. In physics, a period is the recurrent temporal loop of a wave’s frequency; in history, it represents events artificially bounded by dates for narrative purposes; in gynecology, it is the colloquial expression of menstruation; in grammar, it terminates the sentence. For geologists, a period stretches to the length of a hundred million years and is subdivided into epochs. Hypothetical geologists, working a hundred million years from now, will be able to identify our epoch, now labelled the Anthropocene, thanks to traces left by climate change, extinctions, and radioactive isotopes in the paper-thin sedimentary layer that will represent our era. That the Anthropocene projects geologists into the future, far past the end of the world it simultaneously predicts, demonstrates some of the paradoxical logic bound up in its anthropocentric periodization.
 
The end of the world is unevenly distributed, occurring at different times for different beings and things. For instance, the world has already ended for a species of Hawaiian tree snail, Achatinella apexfulva. The last individual of the species died in captivity at fourteen years of age on New Year’s Day, 2019. On this day both the snail and the species it constituted came to a point, full stop. The extinction of this tree snail can be attributed to the introduction of an invasive species by the invasive species par excellenceHomo sapiens. The end of the world for the tree snail is therefore a part of the anthropogenic extinction event—thought to be, as Elizabeth Kolbert suggests, only the sixth such moment in the history of life on planet Earth.
 
Humanity is not living through the simultaneous, universal doomsday predicted by so many eschatological enthusiasts, but rather the uneven punctuation of species, narratives, epochs, and even islands. Many indigenous and colonized people, for example, are already living in a post-apocalyptic world. Though the Anthropocene is useful for representing the planetary scale of human influence, its imagination of the end is consistent with many human predictions and depictions of a universal apocalypse: namely, it presents “the end” as globally homogenous and simultaneous. We know, however, that western capitalist corporations are overwhelmingly responsible for environmental effects suffered predominantly by marginalized people in the Global South and elsewhere. In Future Remains: A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene Rob Nixon asks, “Doesn’t lumping together under the sign of the human the average twenty-first-century Liberian and the average twenty-first-century American as agents of planetary change risk concealing more than it reveals?” (2018, 8). Though the West imagines an evenly distributed “end,” how might we reconceive the heterogeneity of the period, of “ends”? What can the study of media reveal about our current environmental period?
 
In light of these questions, The Neutral seeks submissions that deal with mediated imaginations of periods—as temporal significations that mark everything from the end of a sentence to the span of geological epochs—with a view to complicating traditional ideas about apocalypse generally, and the Anthropocene specifically.
 
Some potential avenues of investigation include:
  • Our understandings of such broad concepts as “the earth,” “nature,” “climate,” and “media” have become increasingly partisan and increasingly fixed—climate science is truth and the self-made destruction of the human is total and imminent, or climate science is untruth created and promulgated for the purposes of anti-industrial, anti-capitalist fear mongering. How has media worked to industrially, formally, and narratively construct and dismantle the ahistorical, western and anthropocentric teleologies of both of these perspectives?
  • Can attempts to re-articulate the idea of the Anthropocene steer us past some of its pitfalls? Are there merits to some of the proposed alternatives to the Anthropocene—such as: Bernard Stiegler’s Neganthropocene, Donna Haraway’s Chthulucene, and the Capitalocene—or are these geo-logisms just obscene?
  • How might the temporal and non-anthropocentric critiques of media archaeology (Jussi Parikka’s Geology of Media, for example) be brought to bear on the strictures of the geological record? Have historically underserved media forms offered potential avenues of inquiry that suggest signposts around our mediated obsessions with destruction and its immanence?
  • Serialized storytelling presents complications for the rhetorical period and periods in media. Whether the problem of what constitutes an ending of or in a series, the issue of periods of quality or weakness in a series, or the turning of a period into an ellipsis through cliffhangers, easter eggs, or post-credits scenes, the expansion of serialized storytelling in moving image media challenges classical conceptions of narrative structure and cohesion. How might our conceptualizations of seriality and narrative structure need to adapt to this transformation of the period into other rhetorical forms of narrative closure (or lack thereof)?
  • The body as a bearer of time: Surely, any marker of time is bound to chronicle time incompletely. The menstrual period, as a marker of duration and cycle—a stretch of days with monthly returns—is only a fractional account of the indefinite time of ongoing bodily operations. How is time catalogued or uncatalogued in the corporeal realm? In what ways do geological periods become inscribed on the body?  How is the concept of the period, in both marking out and terminating stretches of time, experienced through bodies on screen? How does the body mediate periods for us?

*       *       *

Please submit completed essays:
  • Between 5,000-7,000 words in length, including endnotes and citations
  • As a word document in Chicago style
  • To theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com with the subject line “Period Submission”
  • With name and affiliation included in body of email only
  • By June 30th, 2019

 

The Neutral est un nouveau périodique d’études médiatiques évalué par les pairs. Issue de l’Institut d’Études Cinématographiques de l’Université de Toronto, The Neutra se dédie à l’étude d’objets médiatiques divers selon une approche multidisciplinaire. Le journal est publié en ligne au: www.theneutraljournal.com

Pour sa seconde édition, The Neutral sollicite des contributions pour…

Period.
A special issue on Environmental Media and Punctuation

Un point est un marqueur temporel qui désigne à la fois l’étendue d’une durée et l’instant d’une fin. Tout comme la period en anglais, le point est à la fois une portion de l’espace ou du temps déterminée avec précision et considérée abstraitement pour localiser un phénomène, ainsi qu’une portion de l’espace dont toutes les dimensions linéaires sont nulles. Au début du 19 ième siècle, la « période » désigne aussi simultanément la durée plus ou moins longue d’une manifestation physiologique, la fameuse période menstruelle par exemple, ainsi que la durée géologique, ces grandes divisions chronologiques de l’histoire de la terre, ellesmêmes divisées en époques. Cette période géologique permet plus spécifiquement d’imaginer un cadre structurel dans lequel d’hypothétiques géologues, travaillant à un million d’années du présent, seront vraisemblablement en mesure d’identifier notre époque que nous nommons Anthropocène grâce aux traces laissées par les changements climatiques, les extinctions, ainsi que les isotopes radioactifs présents dans les minces couches sédimentaires. Que l’Anthropocène projette ainsi des géologues du futur bien après la fin du monde qu’elle prédit simultanément démontre quelques-unes des approches paradoxales de cette périodisation anthropocentrique.

La fin du monde se déploie de manière inégale, s’organisant déjà autour de diverses êtres et choses. Par exemple, le monde s’est déjà conclu pour l’espèce d’escargot hawaïen Achatinella apexfulva. Le dernier individu de l’espèce est mort en captivité à l’âge de 14 ans au jour de l’an 2019. À ce moment, cet individu et son espèce ont atteint un point mort, une fin. L’extinction de cette espèce d’escargot peut être attribuée à l’introduction d’une espèce envahissante par l’espèce envahissante par excellence. Homo sapiens. La fin du monde pour l’Achatinella apexfulva fait donc partie de l’événement d’extinction anthropogénique – seulement le sixième événement du genre sur la planète Terre selon Elizabeth Kolbert.

L’humanité ne vit pas le jugement dernier simultané et universel prédit par l’argument eschatologique. Elle fait plutôt face à une extinction ponctuelle et inégale des espèces, des narratives, des époques et même des îles. Par exemple, plusieurs peuples autochtones et colonisés vivent déjà dans un monde post-apocalyptique. Bien que l’Anthropocène soit un outil utile pour représenter la dimension planétaire de l’influence humaine, sa caractérisation de la fin participe d’une tendance humaine à prédire et caractériser une apocalypse universelle : on y présente une « fin » globalement homogène et simultanée. Nous savons par contre que les compagnies occidentales sont largement responsables des effets environnementaux dont souffrent majoritairement les populations marginalisées du Sud et d’ailleurs. Dans son livre Future Remains : A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene Rob Nixon demande : « Doesn’t lumping together under the sign of the human the average twenty-first-century Liberian and the average twenty-first-century American as agents of planetary change risk concealing more than it reveals? » (2018, 8). Bien que l’occident imagine une distribution simultanée de la “fin”, comment pourrions-nous faire le point et reconsidérer l’hétérogénéité de la période, des « fins »? Qu’est-ce que les études médiatiques peuvent nous révéler sur la présente période environnementale?

À la lueur de ces questionnements, The Neutral lance un appel pour des propositions d’article traitant de l’imagination médiatisée des périodes, ces points de repère qui forment des abstractions spatio-temporelles et marquent autant la fin d’une phrase que l’étendue d’une période géologique. Le numéro a pour objectif de compliquer nos idées traditionnelles du concept de période en général, et des périodes qui traitent de la fin de manière plus spécifique, de l’apocalypse à l’Anthropocène.

Voici quelques exemples d’approches potentielles :

  • Notre compréhension de sujets aussi vastes que « la terre », « la nature », « le climat », ainsi que la « médiatisation » se situe de plus en plus à l’intérieur d’une partisanerie rigide : d’un côté la science du climat est la vérité et la destruction humaine est totale et imminente; de l’autre la science du climat est une contrevérité véhiculée à des fins anti-industrielles et anticapitalistes. Comment la médiatisation a-t-elle pu construire et démantelé de manière industrielle, formelle et narrative les téléologies anhistoriques, occidentales et anthropocentriques de ces deux perspectives?
  • Est-ce que les efforts de redéfinition de l’Anthropocène nous aident vraiment à contrecarrer ses principales pierres d’achoppement? Est-ce qu’un bienfondé réside dans les propositions alternatives à l’Anthropocène qu’on retrouve chez Bernard Stiegler (Néganthropocène), Donna Haraway (Chtulucene) et Jason Moore (Capitalocene), ou est-ce que ces positions ne sont que des géo-logismes obscènes?
  • Comment les critiques temporelles et non anthropocentriques de l’archéologie des médias (Geology of Media de Jussi Parikka, par exemple) peuvent-elles nous aider à entrevoir les critiques de la périodisation géologique? Nos formes médiatiques historiquement asservies nous offrent-elles d’intéressantes avenues d’interrogation en tant que catalyseur de nos obsessions à l’égard de la médiatisation de la destruction et de son immanence?
  • La narration sérialisée complique à la fois la présente rhétorique de la période narrative ainsi que la périodisation générale des époques médiatiques. Qu’on se concentre sur ce qui représente la fin dans une série ou la fin d’une série; sur la problématique des périodes de qualités ou de faiblesses d’une série; ou sur la transformation de la période d’une série en ellipse à travers les procédés de cliffhanger, easter eggs, et de scènes cachées, l’importance de la narration sérialisée dans les médias audiovisuels vient déstabiliser nos conceptions narratives traditionnelles reliées aux principes de structure et de cohésion. De quelle manière nos conceptions de sérialité et de structure narrative devront-elles s’adapter à cette transformation de la période en de nouvelles formes rhétoriques de dénouement (ou d’absence de dénouement) narratif?
  • Le corps comme ancrage temporel : bien évidemment, n’importe quel marqueur temporel est destiné à échouer une tâche de représentation complète. La période menstruelle, en tant que marqueur d’une durée et d’un cycle – une étendue de jours à l’intérieur d’une répétition mensuelle – n’est que le compte-rendu fractionnel du temps indéfini des opérations corporelles continuelles. Comment cataloguons-nous le temps, ou comment renions-nous ce catalogage du temps, dans le domaine corporel? De quelle manière les périodes géologiques s’inscrivent-elles sur le corps? Comment les concepts de la période et du point (punctum) en tant que marqueurs de l’étendue d’une durée et de l’instant d’une fin sont-ils éprouvés par des corps à l’écran? Comment est-ce que le corps médiatise des périodes pour nous?

Veuillez s’il-vous-plaît soumettre des articles complets

  • entre 5000 et 7000 mots, incluant citations et notes de bas de page;
  • dans un format word, au format bibliographique Chicago;
  • à notre theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com avec l’objet « Period submission »;
  • avec votre nom et affiliation inclus dans le corps de votre courriel seulement;
  • d’ici le 30ème Juin, 2019.
 

Comments are closed.