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The Faculty of Arts, Department of Communication, Media and Film invites applications for an Instructor (3-year limited term) in the area of Film Studies. The anticipated start date is August 1, 2020.

We are seeking a scholar who will have the primary responsibility of teaching Film Studies at the undergraduate level in the program’s core areas (introduction to film studies, film history, and film theory), in addition to areas of specialization. Demonstrated teaching expertise in these core areas, as well as one of the following areas is required: cinemas of Asia, Africa, the Middle East or Latin America; indigenous cinema; critical race theory; feminist film history; film/media production. Ability to teach courses in communication and media studies, or television and digital media would be an asset.

The teaching duties for this position consist of seven courses distributed over three academic semesters. As part of their responsibilities, the incumbent will be expected to participate in the development of courses within the department, be involved with the extra-curricular events on campus and within the broader community with the goal to sustain a vibrant program. Mentorship of students and service to the department, faculty, and university is also expected.

The preferred candidate will hold a PhD in Film Studies or a closely related field. The incumbent will have experience or potential to teach film studies at the university level and will demonstrate the potential for pedagogical innovation and excellence in undergraduate teaching.

The Department of Communication, Media and Film is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. We value interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourage collaboration. For more information about the Department of Communication, Media and Film please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/communication-media-film.

All applications must be received by April 11, 2020.

Interested individuals are encouraged to submit an application online via the ‘Apply Now’ link. Please be aware that the application process allows for only four attachments. Your four application attachments should be organized to contain the following (which may require you to merge documents):

  • Letter of application that details teaching experience and area(s) of scholarly interest 
  • Updated curriculum vitae with names and contact information for 3 referees
  • Statement of teaching philosophy and a teaching dossier. This should include two sample course syllabi (one for Introduction to Film Studies, and the other a course of your choice) and two sets of course evaluations 

These materials should be addressed to:

Dr. Charles Tepperman, Department Head
Department of Communication, Media and Film
Faculty of Arts
University of Calgary
Room 320 Social Sciences Bldg.
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4

All applicants are strongly encouraged to visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/communication-media-film to obtain additional information.

The University of Calgary recognizes that a diverse staff/faculty benefits and enriches the work, learning and research experiences of the entire campus and greater community. We are committed to removing barriers that have been historically encountered by some people in our society. We strive to recruit individuals who will further enhance our diversity and will support their academic and professional success while they are here. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To learn more about academic opportunities at the University of Calgary and all we have to offer, view our Academic Careers website. For more information about the Faculty of Arts visit Careers in the Faculty of Arts.

About the University of Calgary
 
The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to be recognized as one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. The University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.
 
About Calgary, Alberta

Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and has been named one of the world’s most livable cities for years. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America. 

 

Need help?

View our Application FAQs for answers to common questions regarding the application and selection process.

 

Call for Submissions

2020 Annual Graduate Music Conference

Department of Music, University of Alberta

“Revisualizing Sound and Music”

Edmonton, Canada

May 15-16, 2020

The Graduate Music Students’ Association (GMSA) of the University of Alberta is pleased to announce a call for submissions for our annual NCounters Graduate Conference. The conference will take place on Friday, May 15 and Saturday, March 16, 2020

Music visualizes our wildest dreams and imaginations, and revisualizes the finest creations of humanity. At the GMSA’s NCounters Conference, we thrive to inquire and “revisualize” the endless possibilities of music research and discourse. As a multi-formatted conference, we aim to facilitate innovative graduate research by providing a platform and safe space for grad students from everywhere to present their work and engage with fellow researchers in an inclusive and interdisciplinary environment. 

We encourage submissions from any topic in the study of music including but not limited to:

–       Musicology; ethnomusicology; music theory

–       Film and media music; popular music

–       Composition; performance

–       Music education; music therapy

We also welcome compositions and lecture recitals including but not limited to:  

–       Composed concert pieces 

–       Electroacoustic compositions

–       Improvised music performances

–       Sound Installations (please note that space is limited

This year, we are delighted to have two distinguished scholars as keynote speakers

Dr. Emilie LeBel, Assistant Professor of Composition from MacEwan University. She specializes in orchestral music composition, chamber music composition, electronic music, as well as integrated works that apply digital and intermedia concert pieces. She is an affiliated composer at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Selected works include Hiraeth (2019, Migration No. 2), Mark Takeshi McGregor, Lutalica, Redshift Records; and Navigational view of South Foreland Point and the Kent Coast, 1840 (2018), in Land’s End Ensemble, Pulling the Light, Centrediscs.

Dr. Brian Fauteux, Assistant Professor of Popular Music from the University of Alberta. His research areas include cultural studies, media studies, film, and is particularly interested in music industries and music radio, which integrate discourses of cultural studies, history, and policies. He is currently working on a SSHRC-funded research that examines copyright and cultural labor issues in the digital music industries. Selected publications include Music in Range: The Culture of Canadian Campus Radio (2015); and “The Radio Host and Piloted Listening in the Digital Age: CBC Radio 3 and Its Online Listening Community” (2017).

Paper presentations are no longer than 20 minutes and lecture recitals should be no longer than 30 minutes, all followed by a 10-minute question period. For compositions, please send submission samples in either an MP3 or MP4 format, or a URL link. If attaching a score, please format it as a PDF file. 

Please submit an abstract of no longer than 350 words as a Word or PDF attachment to gmsa@ualberta.ca no later than Sunday, March 15, 2020. In the body of the email, please include name, affiliation, contact information and A/V requirements

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at gmsa@ualberta.ca. We look forward to your submissions! 

 
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CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS FOR FSAC 2020

The Annual Conference of the Film Studies Association of Canada
June 2 – June 4, 2020
Western University, London, Ontario
Held in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences Congress 2020 Theme: “Bridging Divides: Confronting Colonialism and Anti-Black Racism”

Martin Walsh Memorial Lecture: Sylvia D. Hamilton, Rogers Chair in Communications, University of King’s College
Gerard Pratley Award:
Oriane Morriet (Université de Montréal): « L’empathie : le choix des auteurs québécois et canadiens des oeuvres en réalité virtuelle ? »

FSAC is now seeking proposals for the 2020 conference in London, Ontario, on the traditionallands of the Anishinaabek, Haudenosaunee, Lūnaapéewak and Attawandaron (Neutral) people.

We welcome proposals for:

  • Individual presentations
  • Pre-constituted panels
  • Workshops or round-tables
  • Screenings, exhibitions and other events—on topics related to the Congress theme, or on any other film or media studies topic
 

Proposal Submission Deadline: January 15, 2020

Please note that proposals will be only be considered from applicants who are paid up members of the association. Memberships may be obtained/renewed here: http://www.filmstudies.ca/membership

Submit proposals by email to: conference2020@filmstudies.ca

Proposal format:

  • In an email, include applicant name, affiliation, short bio (50 words or less), and paper title
  • Attach a 500 word abstract (with title) and 3-5 bibliographic references. Abstracts will be blind- reviewed; please do not include name or affiliation in the attachment.

Pre-constituted panels should be submitted by the proposed panel chair and include individual proposals (in the format above) with the title of the proposed panel indicated on each abstract.

Workshop and Roundtable proposals should include the following information:

  • Chair’s name, rank/status, institutional affiliation and email address
  • Title of workshop or roundtable
  • Abstract describing the theme/issue to be considered (350-500 words)
  • List of participants including name, rank/status, institutional affiliation, and email
  • Description of their contribution
  • Four relevant keywords
  • 4-6 bibliographic references

* You should plan to participate in a maximum of two forums, neither of which may be the same in kind. For example, you may propose and deliver a paper and submit a workshop proposal, but you may not submit two individual paper proposals (whether single or co- authored).

Additional information and instructions:

  • Presentations may be in either English or French.
  • Individual presentations are to be no longer than 20 minutes (including clips).
  • The length of presentations on panels, workshops, and/or round-tables may vary depending on the specific constitution of the session.
  • All proposals will be adjudicated by the Programming Committee.
  • All papers presented at the FSAC Conference must be original works. Proposals for previously presented papers will not be accepted.

Graduate Student Funding
• Partial financial compensation for student members’ travel to attend the annual general meeting may be provided by the Association. For more details and the application form, visit http://www.filmstudies.ca/category/grad-students

Audio-Visual Needs
All conference presentation rooms will have video/data projectors, screens, basic sound systems, and connections for laptop computers.

Conference Organizing Committee

Program Chair: Peter Lester (President, FSAC)
Department of Communication, Popular Culture, and Film, Brock University Office phone: (905) 688-5550 x3822
plester@brocku.ca

Local Arrangements Coordinator: Janelle Blankenship Department of English and Writing Studies, Western University Office phone: (519) 661-2111 ext. 87882
jblanke2@uwo.ca

 


 

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APPEL À COMMUNICATIONS POUR LE CONGRÈS DE L’ACÉC 2020

 

Colloque annuel de l’Association Canadienne d’Études Cinématographiques
2 – 4 juin, 2020
L’Université Western, London, Ontario
Tenu dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines
Le thème du congrès 2020: « Bâtir des passerelles : combattre le colonialisme et le racisme anti-Noirs »

Conférence commémorative Martin Walsh : Sylvia D. Hamilton, Rogers Chair in Communications, University of King’s College

Conférence de prix Gerald Pratley : Oriane Morriet (Université de Montréal) : « L’empathie : le choix des auteurs québécois et canadiens
des oeuvres en réalité virtuelle ? »

L’ACÉC sollicite des propositions de communication pour son colloque annuel qui se tiendra du 2 au 4 juin 2020 à London, Ontario, sur les terres traditionnelles des nations Anishinaabek, Haudenosaunee, Lūnaapéewak et Attawandaron (Neutres).

Nous accueillons des propositions :

  • de communication individuelle
  • de panel préconstitué
  • d’atelier ou de table ronde
  • de projection, d’exposition ou de tout autre événement portant sur des sujets liésau thème du colloque ou sur tout autre sujet lié aux études cinématographiques ou médiatiques

Date limite pour soumettre les propositions : 15 janvier 2020

Veuillez prendre note que vous devez être membre de l’Association au moment de la soumission de votre proposition – autrement, votre proposition ne sera pas considérée. Vous pouvez vous inscrire ou renouveler votre inscription ici : http://www.filmstudies.ca/membership?lang=fr

Envoyez vos propositions à : conference2020@filmstudies.ca

Format des propositions :

• Dans un message électronique, indiquez votre nom, votre affiliation, une courte notice bio-bibliographique (50 mots ou moins) et le titre de votre communication.
• En pièce jointe, attachez votre proposition de communication (500 mots) ainsi que votre titre et 3-5 références bibliographiques. Puisque les propositions seront évaluées à l’aveugle, prière de ne pas inclure votre nom ni votre affiliation dans la pièce jointe.

Pour les panels préconstitués : les propositions seront soumises par le responsable du panel et doivent inclure toutes les propositions individuelles (suivant le format ci- dessous). Vous devez inclure le titre du panel sur chacun des résumés.

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Les propositions de table ronde et d’atelier doivent inclure les informations suivantes :

  • Nom du responsable de panel, poste/statut, affiliation et adresse courriel
  • Titre de l’atelier ou de la table ronde
  • Résumé décrivant le thème/sujet qui sera abordé (350-500 mots)
  • Liste des participant.e.s incluant leur nom, poste/statut, affiliation, et courriel
  • Descriptions des contributions des participant.e.s
  • Quatre mots clés
  • 4-6 références bibliographiques

* Veuillez noter que vous ne pouvez participer qu’à deux événements du colloque. Ces événements ne doivent pas être de même nature. Par exemple, vous pouvez proposer une communication et un atelier, mais vous ne pouvez pas proposer deux communications (que vous soyez auteur.e unique ou co-auteur.e).

Informations et instructions supplémentaires :

  • Les présentations peuvent être en français ou en anglais.
  • Les communications individuelles ne doivent pas dépasser 20 minutes (incluant la présentation d’extraits).
  • La durée d’un panel, d’un atelier ou d’une table ronde peut varier selon leur organisation.
  • Toutes les propositions de communication seront évaluées par le comité organisateur du colloque.

• Toutes les communications présentées à la conférence annuelle de l’ACÉC doivent être originales. Elles ne doivent être pas avoir été publiées ni présentées ailleurs. Les propositions de communications antérieures ne seront pas acceptées.

Financement étudiant
L’Association sera en mesure de fournir des compensations financières partielles pour le déplacement des membres étudiant.e.s qui seront présent.e.s à l’assemblée générale annuelle. Visitez notre site pour plus de détails et pour accéder au formulaire d’application : http://www.filmstudies.ca/category/grad-students.

Matériel audiovisuel
Toutes les salles de conférence du colloque seront équipées de projecteurs numériques, d’écrans, de systèmes de son, et de connexions pour les ordinateurs portables.

 

Comité d’organisation du colloque

Président du programme : Peter Lester (Président, ACÉC)
Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film, Brock University Téléphone: (905) 688-5550 x3822
plester@brocku.ca

Coordonnatrice locale : Janelle Blankenship
Department of English and Writing Studies, Western University Office phone: (519) 661-2111 ext. 87882
jblanke2@uwo.ca

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FILM-PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE

6-8 July 2020
At OCAD University, Toronto
Co-Hosted by OCAD University, Ryerson University, and York University
KEYNOTES:
Kara Keeling (University of Chicago) Brian Price (University of Toronto) two more TBA

We invite proposals for presentations on any subject related to film, media and philosophy for the Film-Philosophy Conference 2020 to be held at OCAD University and the TIFF-Bell Lightbox in Toronto. There is no overall theme or specialized topics for the conference. We will instead use a “track” system that provides a number of broad headings to which a presenter may wish to attach their submission. There is, of course, an Open track if you feel that your paper does not fit within any of the other tracks. The tracks for 2020 are (in alphabetic order):

• Affect and Emotion
• Aesthetics
• The Animal and the Non-Human
• Canadian Cinema
• Documentary and Essay Films
• Ecology
• Emergent Film-Philosophies
• Ethics
• Existentialism
• Expanded Cinema, Film Installation,
Video Art
• Film and Critical Race Theory
• Film-Philosophy Canon
• Film-Philosophy Pedagogy
• Gender and Feminism
• Indigeneity and Fourth Cinema
• New Materialism and Object-Oriented
Ontology
• New Media and Technologies
• Open
• Phenomenology
• Political Film-Philosophy
• Queer approaches to Film-Philosophy • Realism
• Religion, Secularism, Postsecularism • Workshops

We are only accepting individual proposals for presentations of 20 minutes.
We do not accept group proposals, except for Workshops. We are open to workshops that have alternative and innovative formats that provoke discussion and debate. If you have any ideas for a workshop – in format or content – please contact one of the conference directors before submitting an official abstract via the website.

We invite 300-word abstract proposals to be submitted by 31 January 2020. All abstracts will be considered by at least two members of the conference committee and decisions will be announced in March 2020.

Click here to submit a proposal for the 2020 Film-Philosophy Conference.

Please direct all enquiries regarding the conference to the conference e- mail: FPToronto2020@gmail.com

Individual conference organizers may be reached at:
John Caruana (jcaruana@ryerson.ca) Mark Cauchi (mcauchi@yorku.ca) Selmin Kara (selminkara@gmail.com)

 

From Annihilation to High Life:

Feminist Posthumanism and Postfeminist Humanism in

Contemporary Science Fiction Film

 

Joint panel of the Posthumanism Research Network and FSAC

Annual Meeting of the Film Studies Association of Canada(FSAC), June 02-04, 2020, University of Western Ontario, London (ON)

Organizers: Julia Empey (WLU) and Russell Kilbourn (WLU)

 

Deadline for submission of abstracts: January 06, 2020

 

 

In 2018 two films were released—Claire Denis’ High Life and Alex Garland’s Annihilation—representing two different poles of contemporary SF film narrative, and two different explorations of specific posthumanist (as well as transhumanist) themes. The two films are similar to the extent that they challenge the Enlightenment Humanist narrative that has dominated Western thought for the last four centuries. Annihilation and High Life can be conceived as two ends of a spectrum of contemporary SF cinema intimately invested in the debates around the posthuman and the critical posthumanities within a feminist critical-theoretical context. The decentring of the human at the core of posthumanist thought has its corollary—indeed, its typological anticipation—in feminism’s de-centring of ‘man.’ That neither of these transformations has entirely succeeded is a problem that informs the story in each of these films, albeit from entirely different perspectives, with a radically different audiovisual language in each case.

In Rosi Braidotti’s (2019) terms, we are now living “the posthuman predicament” resulting from the convergence of the ongoing critique of a Eurocentric Humanist philosophical legacy and the anthropocentric habits of representation it supports. According to Cecilia Åsberg (2018), critical posthumanism is in an important sense exemplified in feminist theory, “long critiquing the centrality of the figure of Man for its gender chauvinism.” Arguably, the (dis-)embodied female could be the ultimate posthuman subject. This panel seeks to place posthumanism and feminism in direct conversation as mediated through contemporary science fiction films. Both posthumanism and feminism aim to counter or dismantle a masculinist, patriarchist Enlightenment Humanism, and SF cinema has been putting these seemingly disparate schools of thought into dialogue for some time now. Where typically the mention of SF in the posthumanist context brings a whole set of (often clichéd) transhumanist tropes to mind—the cyborg, technologically augmented bodies, AI subjectivities, etc.—we encourage instead the submission of papers that either: (a) prioritize analyses of specific examples of contemporary SF cinema that engage in meaningful ways with the burgeoning field of critical posthumanism; or (b) utilize such films as case studies in the interrogation of posthumanist and feminist as well as humanistic ideas. In either case, papers grounded in formal film analysis are strongly encouraged.

 

 

Possible topics and films include, but are not limited to:

  • Feminist alterities
  • Posthuman ecologies
  • Posthuman subjectivities
  • Gender before and behind the camera in SF film
  • Futurism (both Italian and its newer incarnations) 
  • New materialism
  • Gendered cyborgs
  • Posthuman femininity/masculinity
  • Scarlett Johansson
  • Natalie Portman
  • Arrival (2016, Denis Villeneuve)
  • Blade Runner(1982, Ridley Scott)
  • Blade Runner 2049(2017, Denis Villeneuve)
  • Ex Machina(2014, Alex Garland)
  • Her(2013, Spike Jonze)
  • Lucy(2014, Luc Besson)
  • Metropolis(1928, Fritz Lang)
  • Under the Skin(2013, Jonathan Glazer)
  • Etc.

Authors are invited to submit a 500-word abstract for a paper of max. 20 minutes reading time as well as a 250-word biographical note. The deadline for submitting an abstract is Monday January 06, 2020.

Abstracts can be emailed to Julia Empey (empe3530@mylaurier.ca) and Russell Kilbourn (rkilbourn@wlu.ca).

Notification of acceptance will be sent by early February.

 

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22nd Annual FSAC Graduate Colloquium
York University, Friday February 28 – Sunday March 1st, 2020
Call for papers: “Activity”

Keynote address by Dr. Brenda Longfellow, York University

Call for Papers: Activity

Cinema is an active agent: the mutual and reciprocal relationship between moving images and their spectators, the very act of making cinema, is a direct action. Packaged within this making is the action on the screen, the action of the technology capturing and then displaying the cinematic object, and the actions of the spectator. These activities extend well beyond screenings, into production, archiving, theorizing, and distributing; cinema is a collaborative, communal, multi-technological process of creation that spreads itself across vast networks of spectatorship, reception, distribution, imaginaries, and/or activisms. Such cases are woven into the medium’s history: from early Soviet montage articulating class struggle, to the Brechtian cinemas of the late French New Wave, to second wave feminist consciousness raising, and to contemporary practises in interactive documentary and new media, cinema has routinely been considered and used in service of a political modality. In 2020, cinema’s activities are global, streaming over the internet, and able to represent and shape the great forces of our current moment, including, but not limited to, climate catastrophe, mass migration, global civil war, economies of precarious labour, and the ongoing project of settler colonialism. These forces manifest simultaneously as hyper-local, ingrained in the communities their making emerges from, sites where both positive and negative consequences are most intimately felt.

The 22nd Annual FSAC Graduate Colloquium at York University coincides with the Cinema and Media Arts Department’s 50th anniversary. This department was built on a foundation of political praxis, in response to and continuation of this history of a cinema which is inherently political and active. It was in this spirit that in 1985 a collective of York University film professors—including Robin Wood, Andrew Britton, Scott Forsyth, among other notable scholars, critics, and filmmakers—founded CineAction, a self-described “magazine of radical film criticism and theory”. In her editorial contribution to CineAction’s final issue in 2016, co-founder Florence Jacobowitz conceives of the magazine’s approach to film criticism as a kind of political activity, recalling its founding “out of necessity, as a magazine that would publish politicized readings and where theory could be tested against critical practice (instead of simply imposed)”. Consequently, this year we ask for an engagement with the idea of activity and activism in film theory, history, and practise. How is cinema used as a tool of direct action? How does form foster political engagement?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
Medium specificity and activism
Cinema and direct action
New media(s)
Documentary
Worldbuilding and futurisms—imaginations of the world as otherwise
Queer and trans cinemas
Research creation
Public and participatory art practices—artists intervening in the public sphere
Counterpublic spheres
Community media histories
Activist film festivals
Archival interventions
Media and pedagogy
The Anthropocene

Interested students should submit an abstract of no more than 300-500 words through the following form by Friday, January 3rd: https://forms.gle/P8ZKqFtw58Kz1yZV8

***

22e Colloque annuel de l’ACÉC pour les étudiant-e-s des cycles supérieurs
Université York, Vendredi, 28 février – Dimanche, 1er mars 2020
Appel à conférence : « Activité »

Conférence liminaire : Prof. Brenda Longfellow, Université York

Appel à communication : Activité

Le cinéma est un agent actif : la relation mutuelle et réciproque entre les images en mouvement et leurs spectateurs, l’acte de faire du cinéma, est une action directe. Dans toute cette création se retrouve l’activité que l’on retrouve à l’écran, l’activité derrière la technologie de captation, ainsi que la monstration de l’objet cinématographique, en plus des activités spectatorielles. Ces activités se prolongent bien au-delà de l’écran, dans la production, l’archivage, la théorisation et la distribution ; le cinéma est collaboratif, communal, un procédé de création pluritechnologique qui s’étend jusqu’aux vastes réseaux spectatoriels, de réception, de distribution, de l’imagination, et/ou d’activisme. De tels exemples se tissent dans l’histoire de ce médium : des débuts du montage de l’avant-garde soviétique qui traitaient de la lutte des classes, des théories brechtiennes associées à la nouvelle vague française, de la deuxième vague féministe et de la sensibilisation, jusqu’aux pratiques contemporaines dans le documentaire interactif et des nouveaux médias, le cinéma a toujours été systématiquement considéré et utilisé au service d’une modalité politique. En 2020, les activités cinématographiques sont mondiales, diffusées en continu sur Internet, tout en ayant la possibilité de représenter et de façonner les grandes forces du moment y compris, mais sans s’y limiter, la catastrophe environnementale, l’immigration massive, la guerre civile mondiale, l’économie des emplois précaires, ainsi que les colonies de peuplement actuelles. Ces influences se manifestent simultanément d’un point de vue hyperlocal, enracinées dans les communautés desquelles elles émergent, dont les conséquences, qu’elles soient positives ou négatives, sont intimement liées.

Le 22e Colloque annuel de l’ACÉC pour les étudiants des cycles supérieurs à l’Université York coïncide avec le 50e anniversaire de son département de cinéma et d’arts médiatiques. Ce département a été créé sur des bases de la praxis politique, en réponse et en prolongement de cette histoire d’un cinéma fondamentalement politique et actif. C’était dans cet esprit qu’en 1985, un collectif de professeurs en cinéma de l’Université York incluant Robin Wood, Andrew Britton, Scott Forsyth, avec d’autres spécialistes, critiques et cinéastes, a fondé CineAction, un magazine décrit comme traitant de la critique et de la théorie cinématographique radical. Dans sa contribution éditoriale pour l’ultime numéro de CineAction en 2016, la cofondatrice Florence Jacobowitz mentionne que l’approche envers la critique cinématographique a été conçue comme une sorte d’activité politique, se remémorant ces fondements comme une nécessité en tant que magazine qui publierait des textes politisés où la théorie pourrait être mise à l’épreuve contre la pratique analytique (au lieu de simplement l’imposer). Nous demandons donc, par conséquent, cette année de faire appel à un engagement avec cette idée de l’activité et de l’activisme associée avec la théorie du cinéma, l’histoire et la pratique. Comment le cinéma est-il utilisé en tant qu’outil d’une action directe ? Comment entretenir la promotion d’un engagement politique ?

Les propositions d’article peuvent aborder les sujets suivants, sans s’y limiter :
Spécificité et militantisme du médium
Cinéma et action directe
Nouveau(x) média(s)
Documentaire
Construction d’univers et futurisme – imagination d’autres mondes
Cinéma gai et transgenre
Recherche-création
Pratiques artistiques publiques ou participatives – artistes intervenant dans la sphère publique
Sphères contre-publiques
Histoire des médias communautaires
Festivals de films activistes
Interventions archivistiques
Média et pédagogie
L’Anthropocène

Les étudiant-e-s intéressé-e-s sont prié-e-s de faire parvenir une proposition comprenant entre 300 et 500 mots en suivant les instructions suivantes d’ici le vendredi 3 janvier 2020 : https://forms.gle/P8ZKqFtw58Kz1yZV8

 

Call for Proposals

The 2020 Carleton University Film Studies Graduate Student Colloquium will be held on Friday, March 6 and Saturday, March 7, 2020, in Ottawa. The organizing committee is excited to announce a call for proposals from students across Canada and studying at the graduate level in film and/or media studies. The conference is not strictly organized around an essential theme and as such we are seeking papers that encompass a broad number of topics within the discipline(s).

This colloquium is sponsored by the Film Studies program, located in the School for Studies in Art and Culture at Carleton University.

The colloquium’s keynote speaker is Susan Lord, a current professor in the Department of Film and Media at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She is interested in feminism, critical theory, and vulnerable media. Currently she is the Director of the Vulnerable Media Lab, and archival project that collects media from groups such as women and Indigenous peoples. Her Keynote Address will occur on the evening of March 6.

Please submit proposals of no more than 300-500 words, for a presentation of twenty minutes, on any topic in film and/or media studies. Include current or past university or institutional affiliation, degree level (MA or PhD), a brief description of research interests (no more than 50 words), and contact email address. Submit proposals, as an email attachment, in a Word document (or Word-compatible file), to:

carletonfilmgsc@gmail.com

The deadline for submissions is Monday, January 6, 2020.

We thank you for your submissions and look forward to your participation in this Colloquium.

Kind regards,

The 2020 Student Colloquium Organizing Committee

 

Source: Department of English, University of Saskatoon
Deadline: February 10, 2020

 

20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada is a three-day international conference to be held at the University of Saskatchewan in August 2020. The conference aims to gather together scholars, authors, and members of the public who are interested in speculative writing in Canada. Works of this genre have provocative implications that challenge conventional visions of reality by alluding to future possible worlds. Despite their focus on the future, speculative works comment on the present and the past. They ask readers to consider environmental, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. Speculative writing has proliferated in past decades, used by authors to represent and report on important societal concerns, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of environmental destruction and political conflict.

In the Canadian context, speculative writing has become a powerful tool to interrogate patriarchal-colonial enterprises. Marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference, use works of speculation to resignify a past marked by oppression, attest their identities, and create spaces of resistance and social change. The conference will invite a keynote speaker who can provoke discussion in these areas and help to strengthen the presence of diverse voices and emerging literary communities.

Speculative worlds have achieved popularity through media representations such as movies, television/internet series, and video games, some of which are adaptations of textual works. Conference organizers expect that participants will present their research on speculation in these media/genres as well as in published writings.

There will be space at the conference for writers of speculative genres to present their work to the public, at an open event on Thursday evening, and we hope to organize a workshop on aspects of speculative writing Saturday morning, for practitioners of the genre.

Following the conference, there will be a call for contributors to submit papers that expand on or respond to conference presentations and discussions, for publication in an essay collection. Featured in that collection will be an interview with the conference’s keynote practitioner of speculative writing. The collection will highlight the material accomplishment of the conference goals, which are to expand discussion and visibility of this literary genre, so significant for the contemporary era in which we live.

The conference is organized by members of the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan. The organizing committee includes faculty and graduate researchers of speculative fiction and practitioners based in our MFA in Writing graduate program. For more information see https://artsandscience.usask.ca/english/.

 

Call for Proposals

20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada

AUGUST 20-22, 2020
UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN, SASKATOON, CANADA

Speculative fiction, film, and television series are fast-growing genres, in part because they comment on the present. These genres ask readers to consider environmental, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. They are often used by their creators to represent, report, and speculate on key societal issues, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of environmental destruction and political conflict. In Canada, speculative writing has become a tool to interrogate colonial enterprises and open up spaces for marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference, to assert their identities and create avenues for resistance. A variety of speculative worlds have achieved popularity through films and television/internet series, some of which are literary adaptations. 20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada invites researchers and creators in the year 2020 to present their own speculations about the futures and/or societies that are presented in various texts produced in or relating to Canada. What do speculative texts tell us? Which visions of “Canada” do we find in speculative texts? How do these visions reflect our own perceptions of the world? Does this kind of literary imagination help us achieve social change? 

Proposals for both papers and panels are invited. These can take a range of approaches related to speculative writing in Canada, including: 

  • Dystopian worlds
  • Utopian and anti-utopian worlds
  • Apocalyptic scenarios
  • Post-apocalyptic futures
  • Feminist speculations
  • Indigenous speculations
  • Decolonizing speculations
  • Speculative writing for children
  • Speculative poetry
  • Climate change and/or technological developments
  • Animals in speculative writing
  • Speculations on language and power
  • Disability in speculative writing
  • Gender and sexuality in speculative writing
  • Speculation and interdisciplinarity
  • Speculations on the screen: movies, documentaries, television and internet series, video games
  • Speculative adaptations
  • Speculative creation, including the writing of speculative fiction* 

*The conference will also host sessions in which creators of speculative genres will be invited to present their works. Authors and artists are invited to propose 20-minute creative pieces; these may involve readings from written works, visual instalments, performance pieces, or film presentations. 

Paper proposals should include the following:

  1. Your name, contact information (including email address and telephone number), and institutional affiliation.
  2. The title of your proposed 20-minute paper or presentation, AND a proposal of 250-300 words, identifying the works that will be your focus of your paper and outlining the argument to be presented OR describing your creative piece and the method of presentation or performance.
  3. A 50-word biographical statement. 

Panel proposals should include the above information for all participants. 

Please e-mail your proposal in a Word document to conference organizers Wendy Roy and Mabiana Camargo of the University of Saskatchewan at 2020vision@usask.ca by February 10, 2020

Conference acceptances will be emailed in April, 2020. For further information, please visit the website or send an email to 2020vision@usask.ca

After the conference, there will be an open call for expanded papers to be published in a collection of essays on speculations in literature and on screen in Canada.

 

Conference Program

We are pleased to announce that the invited keynote speaker for 20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada is Cherie Dimaline. She lives in Ontario and is a member of the Georgian Bay Métis Community. Her fifth novel, Empire of Wild, will be published soon, and she is currently working on the television adaptation of her 2017 bestselling novel The Marrow Thieves.​

The Marrow Thieves focuses on a young Indigenous protagonist and his created “family” in a near-future dystopian Canada. The novel won a Governor General’s Award (2017), Kirkus Prize for Young Readers (2017), Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic (2018), Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Young Adult Literature (2018), and Amy Mathers Teen Book Award (2018). The Marrow Thieves was also a finalist for the White Pine Award and Trillium Book Award in 2018; it was shortlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads contest and appeared as a Book of the Year in lists by publications such as the Globe and Mail newspaper and the School Library Journal.

Further details about the conference program will be posted in spring 2020.

 

Job Field: Tenure Stream 

Faculty / Division: Faculty of Arts and Science 

Department: Cinema Studies Institute 

Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto) 

Job Posting: Sep 19, 2019 

Job Closing: Nov 11, 2019, 11:59pm EST 


Description

The Cinema Studies Institute in the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto, St. George invites applications for a full-time, tenure stream position in the field of Canadian Cinemas, including North American Indigenous cinema and media. The position will be at the rank of Assistant Professor and will start on July 1, 2020, or shortly thereafter.

Candidates must have earned a PhD in Film Studies, Film and Media Studies, or a discipline related to the position as described by the date of appointment or shortly thereafter, and possess a demonstrated record of excellence in both teaching and research.

The successful candidate will be expected to teach in the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Cinema Studies Institute, in both required core courses and more specialized electives; to supervise and mentor students; to participate in affairs at the Institute; and to pursue outstanding, innovative and independent research at the highest international level while establishing a competitive, externally funded research program that will complement and expand our current research strengths. For more information on the Cinema Studies Institute, visit http://www.cinema.utoronto.ca/

 

We are seeking applicants with expertise in Canadian Cinemas, understood to include North American Indigenous cinema and media. Areas of specialization may encompass the history, historiography, and theory of various forms and traditions of Canadian cinemas, including, but not restricted to, documentary, animation, experimental, or narrative modes in anglophone, francophone, diasporic, or indigenous contexts. We also welcome applicants who study cinema and media cultures within Canada, including collaborative practices, co-productions, minoritarian practices, exhibition and reception, film festivals, and non-theatrical uses. Critical engagement with regional, national, and transnational approaches is expected to inform the research projects of those who apply. Interdisciplinary approaches, methodologies, and ways of knowing will also be appreciated. 

 

Excellence in research must be demonstrated through the quality of the writing sample submitted as part of the application, a record of publications or forthcoming publications in top-ranked and field-relevant academic journals, a record of presentations at significant conferences, awards and accolades, the submitted research statement and evidence of an innovative research program, as well as  strong endorsements by referees of high standing. 

 

Excellence in teaching must be demonstrated through a record of teaching accomplishments, strong letters of reference, and a teaching dossier including a statement of teaching philosophy, sample course syllabi, and teaching evaluations, submitted as part of the application.

 

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. 

 

The University of Toronto is one of the world’s top research-intensive universities and, with its multicultural student body and cosmopolitan setting, it offers the opportunity to teach, conduct research, and live in one of the world’s most diverse and dynamic cities.

All qualified candidates are invited to apply by clicking on the link below. Application materials must include a cover letter, a curriculum vita, a statement outlining current and future research interests, a writing sample of no more than 10,000 words, and a teaching dossier (consisting of a statement of teaching philosophy, sample syllabi, and teaching evaluations).  

 

Applicants must also arrange to have at least three external referees send letters of recommendation (signed and on institutional letterhead) directly to the Institute via email to Denise Ing, Assistant to the Director, at cinema.studies@utoronto.ca.

 

All application materials and reference letters must be received by the closing date of November 11, 2019. Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply. We recommend combining attached documents into one or two files in PDF format. If you have questions about this position, please contact Denise Ing at cinema.studies@utoronto.ca.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons/persons of colour, women, Indigenous/Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. 

As part of your application, you will be asked to complete a brief Diversity Survey. This survey is voluntary. Any information directly related to you is confidential and cannot be accessed by search committees or human resources staff. Results will be aggregated for institutional planning purposes. For more information, please see http://uoft.me/UP.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

 

Source: Careers at U of T : Assistant Professor – Canadian Cinema  1903750

 

MEL HOPPENHEIM SCHOOL OF CINEMA

FACULTY OF FINE ARTS, CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

Canada Research Chair in Media and Migration – Film Studies

Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, invites applications for an Emerging (Tier 2) Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Media and Migration within the Film Studies area (which houses the Film and Moving Image Studies doctoral program). The goal of the CRC program is to ensure that Canadian universities “achieve the highest levels of research excellence to become world-class research centres in the global, knowledge-based economy.”

We are seeking an emerging Canadian or international scholar demonstrating promising and innovative investigations into the relation between transnational, migratory and diasporic movements and the media forms and infrastructures in their contemporary or historical dimensions, broadly defined.  Candidates eligible for Tier II chair positions must be exceptional emerging scholars within 10 years of their highest degree at the time of nomination (exclusive of career interruptions). Candidates are encouraged to share any career interruptions or personal circumstances that may have had an impact on their career goals, such as the decision to have a family, eldercare, illness, and so forth, in their letter of application. Please consult the Canada Research Chairs website for full program information, including further details on eligibility criteria.

Possible areas of specialization may include (but are not limited to): the technological, aesthetic, social and cultural dynamics of moving images across media and in global circulation; artistic, experimental, and other oppositional media practices that respond to and represent the intensification of migratory trends (both forced and voluntary); the multiplicity of narratives of migration and ideas about the migrant represented in film and media; labor migration and border-crossing within film and media industries; the entanglements between border regimes and media technologies of surveillance, tracking, and control; relationships between media infrastructures, structures of distribution, and diasporic formations; the mediation of migration patterns beyond South-North vectors; analyses of the shifting terrains of postcolonial and postsocialist spaces and infrastructures, the movement across them, and their articulations in and through media.

Attention to how questions of gender, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, sexuality, religion, class, dis/ability or language intersect with and frame both the patterns and predicaments of movement and the genres of mediation outlined above are strongly encouraged. Accordingly, we particularly encourage applications from underrepresented and minoritized scholars.

The successful candidate will have an important record of innovative or diverse research and publication (or, in the case of a junior scholar, show the promise for such a record with at least one peer-reviewed publication) and have demonstrated an ability to foster collaborative initiatives in or outside the university, secure appropriate funding, and mentor a diverse body of students. The candidate will also be expected to take a leadership role in continuing to build and expand the research culture of the department and university and its graduate programs, and this with an eye to the multiplicity of forms of media and migration around the globe.

The successful candidate for the CRC in Media and Migration, who will have obligatorily defended their PhD by June 30, 2020, will be appointed to the School of Cinema at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor and will be expected to possess expertise in Film Studies with a view of also teaching existing courses in the unit’s curricula. The candidate will work with the Faculty of Fine Arts to prepare the formal CRC application according to CRC program guidelines. The university will nominate the successful candidate to the CRC Secretariat at the earliest opportunity according to the guidelines of the CRC program.

Concordia is located in one of North America’s most diverse, creative and livable cities. The Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema – Canada’s largest university-based centre for the study of film animation, film production and film studies – has an international reputation that continues to provide a benchmark for innovation and quality. The School of Cinema’s Film Studies programs are in great demand as a highly interdisciplinary domain of study situated within the globalization of culture, knowledge and technology. A young PhD program, as well as a vibrant MA in Film Studies, provide a rich context for advanced, critical study of the moving image, as well as for innovative and sustainable research programs in a variety of areas crucial to the rapidly changing field of film study.

Submissions must include a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, copies of recent publications, a one-page research statement, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and three letters of recommendation. Candidates should address in their cover letter how their research and/or experience contribute to equity, diversity or inclusion.

A detailed five-year research plan, appropriate to the goals and objectives of the CRC program, will be required of all long-listed candidates, who will be contacted at the end of October.  Short-listed candidates will be invited for campus interviews in late November or early December.

 

Applications should be submitted or postmarked on or before September 15, 2019to:

 

Mailing and courier address:
Dr. Masha Salazkina 
Re: Canada Research Chair in Media and Migration – Film Studies
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University
1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. West, S-FB 319
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1M8
Fax: 514-848-4255

 

Civic address for in-person delivery:
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema
Faubourg (FB) Tower
Sir George Williams Campus
1250 Guy Street, S-FB 319
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3H 2T4

 

Electronic submissions:
FILMSTUD@algol.concordia.ca

 

All inquiries regarding this position should be directed to:
Dr Masha Salazkina, Search Committee Chair

Email:masha.salazkina@concordia.ca

 

For further information, applicants are encouraged to consult:
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema: http://cinema.concordia.ca
Faculty of Fine Arts: http://finearts.concordia.ca
Academic Services for Fine Arts faculty:
http://finearts.concordia.ca/officeofthedean/servicesandresourcesforfaculty

 

This position, linked to the CRC appointment, will begin July 1, 2020. Review of applications will begin immediately after the application deadline, and will continue until the position is filled.

 

Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Nadia Hardy, Vice-Provost, Faculty Development and Inclusion at vpfdi@concordia.ca or by phone at 514.848.2424 extension 4323.