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Assistant Professor, Open Discipline – Indigenous Focus, Faculty of Arts

Job ID: 22079
Updated: Today
Location: Main Campus

 

Position Description

The Faculty of Arts at the University of Calgary, in partnership with the International Indigenous Studies Program, is seeking applicants for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of assistant professor for an anticipated start date of July 1, 2021. This is an open disciplinary search, meaning any candidate from the social sciences, humanities, or fine arts with a research program/creative practice and teaching expertise centering Indigenous peoples is encouraged to apply.

The successful candidate will join one of the departments or schools in the Faculty of Arts and will divide their teaching and service activities between the International Indigenous Studies Program and their home unit.

In general, the successful candidate will establish and maintain an active research program or creative practice that centers around, or is driven by, Indigenous peoples.  The successful candidate must conduct research informed by Indigenous methodologies, which may include community-driven research and/or research/creative practice in dialogue with Indigenous knowledges and intellectual traditions.  The successful candidate must demonstrate competency in Indigenous pedagogies and working with Indigenous learners. They will teach and supervise at the graduate and undergraduate levels, and provide service to the International Indigenous Studies program, the home department, and potentially the wider community.

The successful candidate will hold a PhD, or terminal degree in their field.  Candidates who can demonstrate they are near completion of their program will be considered; however preference will be given to a candidate with a completed degree.  The appointee’s research agenda may be disciplinary or inter-disciplinary, with a Canadian and/or international focus.

The successful candidate must provide evidence of a record of, or clear potential for, excellence in:

  • Research or research creation with a focus centering Indigenous peoples or Indigeneity
  • Teaching and student mentorship
  • Working with Indigenous learners and content
  • Engagement with, or connections to, Indigenous community

Evidence should include publications in high quality peer-reviewed journals/venues or a record of completed and presented research creation, success with, or potential for, securing competitive funding, and proof of teaching effectiveness.  A record of engagement with Indigenous communities, organizations and/or institutions may include non-peer reviewed reports or briefs, presentations, formal partnerships, research relationship documents or outputs from community-engaged/driven projects, or membership in the community. 

Interested individuals are encouraged to apply online via the ‘Apply Now’ link. Indigenous and equity seeking candidates are invited to self-identify. Please be aware that the application allows for only four attachments. Your four application attachments should be organized to contain the following (which may require you to merge documents):

  • A letter of interest detailing how and why you meet the requirements of the position
  • An up-to-date curriculum vitae
  • For applicants in the social sciences or humanities, no more than two samples of scholarly writing
  • For applicants in the fine arts, a sample portfolio including five works accompanied by descriptions of the work, titles, dates created, mediums, and sizes.  Please reach out to the Director of the International Indigenous Studies Program for file transfer specifications
  • A statement of teaching philosophy and a teaching dossier (which must, at minimum, include two sample syllabi, summaries of the quantitative and qualitative results of two sets of course evaluations, and evidence of teaching experience with Indigenous content or learners)
  • Clear evidence of the applicant’s engagement with, or connections to, an Indigenous community

Applicants should also arrange to have three confidential letters of reference submitted directly to the selection committee at:

Ms. Hoai Dang, 
Administrative Assistant for the International Indigenous Studies Program
University of Calgary
Faculty of Arts
Hoai.dang@ucalgary.ca  

For questions about the posting, please direct your inquiries to:

Dr. Daniel Voth, Director International Indigenous Studies Program
Search Committee Chair
University of Calgary
Faculty of Arts
Email: indg.director@ucalgary.ca

The selection committee will begin reviewing applications on February 25, 2021, and will continue until the position is filled.  It is likely interviews will be virtual.
 

The International Indigenous Studies program is a self-governing interdisciplinary program that centers on the experiences of Indigenous peoples in Canada and internationally.  The program focuses on various aspects of Indigenous perspectives related to art, culture, ways of knowing, languages, economies, politics, and community structures, and attracts students from across the university (https://arts.ucalgary.ca/international-indigenous-studies).  The program is housed administratively in the Department of Political Science, and possesses its own Director, staff, affiliated faculty, and governance structure.

The University of Calgary is engaged in a consultative process with knowledge keepers, Elders, and leaders of the Treaty #7 peoples, the Métis Nation, and academics and university administrators. This ongoing process has resulted in the development of an Indigenous Strategy, ii’taa’poh’to’p – Together in a Good Way – intended to guide the university’s relationship with the Indigenous peoples in whose territory the university resides.  The Indigenous Strategy identifies the International Indigenous Studies program as a source of strength in the effort to transform and decolonize the way teaching, learning, and research occur on campus. This search is one part of the initiative to deepen and strengthen Indigenous focused research, teaching and learning on and off campus.

The University of Calgary has launched an institution-wide Indigenous Strategy in line with the foundational goals of Eyes High, committing to creating a rich, vibrant, and culturally competent campus that welcomes and supports Indigenous Peoples, encourages Indigenous community partnerships, is inclusive of Indigenous perspectives in all that we do.

The University of Calgary recognizes that a diverse staff/faculty benefits and enriches the work, learning and research experiences of the entire campus and greater community. We are committed to removing barriers that have been historically encountered by some people in our society. We strive to recruit individuals who will further enhance our diversity and will support their academic and professional success while they are here. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To learn more about academic opportunities at the University of Calgary and all we have to offer, view our Academic Careers website. For more information about the Faculty of Arts visit Careers in the Faculty of Arts.

About the University of Calgary
 
The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to be recognized as one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. The University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.

The University of Calgary is situated on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot and the people of the Treaty 7 region of Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut’ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearspaw and Wesley First Nation. The City of Calgary is also home to Métis Nation of Alberta, Region III.
 
About Calgary, Alberta

Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and has been named one of the world’s most livable cities for years. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America. 

 

A message from the organizers:

It’s our pleasure to announce the schedule for the 23rd Annual FSAC Graduate Student Colloquium. This year’s theme is ‘Spectre.’ It will be hosted by the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute and take place between Friday, January 29th and Saturday, January 30th. Dr. David Marriott from Penn State University will deliver the keynote presentation at 6:15 pm on Friday, January 29th. The colloquium will be taking place on Zoom Webinar and all are invited. Here are the log-in details:

Day One:
Zoom ID: 831 8161 4061
Passcode: spectre21

Day Two:
Zoom ID: 857 1310 6724
Passcode: spectre21

Please see the attached schedule for more details.

Additionally, there will be a virtual Zoom afterparty on Saturday, January 30th at 8:00pm. Log-in information will be shared during the colloquium. 

We hope to see you there! 

 

 

Call for applications: MA and PhD programs in Film and the Moving Image, Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University, Montreal.

Deadline: February 1, 2021

MA 

The MA in Film and Moving Image Studies is a two-year program that gives students time to build a breadth of knowledge about cinema’s past and future. It also gives you a chance to consider its close relations with other media forms, from television through video and digital platforms. It provides you with a stimulating environment to examine film and the moving image as a political, social, cultural and artistic medium. Students have the opportunity to complete the program in a course-and-MA-thesis stream or in a course-only stream. 

 

PhD 

The PhD in Film and Moving Image Studies provides an ideal environment for students to deepen their understanding of cinema and other moving image media from a wide variety
of historical, cultural and theoretical perspectives. It fosters interdisciplinarity in research and teaching, while being deeply rooted in the discipline of film and media studies and the aesthetic, philosophical, social and political debates that shape it. Seminars are designed exclusively for doctoral students and cover a robust range of scholarship recognizing the value of pluralism in moving image research. 

 

If you have any questions regarding thesis programs, you may reach out to our GPD,  Marc Steinberg (Marc.Steinberg@concordia.ca  film studies.cinema@concordia.ca).

Concordia University is located on unceded Indigenous lands. The Kanien’kehá:ka Nation is recognized as the custodians of the lands and waters where we gratefully live, work and learn. 

 
The UC Santa Barbara Media Fields Collective is excited to announce the call for papers for issue 17 of Media Fields: Critical Explorations of Media in Space.


Please email submissions to submissions@mediafieldsjournal.org by May 7, 2021.
You can review our submission guidelines at mediafieldsjournal.org.



Call for Submissions

Modularity and Modification
Media Fields: Critical Explorations of Media in Space, Issue 17


To move, media must be flexible. Think, for instance, of the remarkably consistent form of the upscale multiplex that has made a home for global blockbuster cinema in China, Mexico, India, Belgium, and Canada alike. Or consider the efforts of communities who have had to salvage, appropriate, and alter telecommunications infrastructure—developing their own technical expertise in the process—in an effort to bring internet connectivity to remote areas neglected by corporate service providers. While distinct, these examples each raise the question of how media flexibility is underpinned by the tension between modularity and modification.

Modularity involves the repetition, standardization, and recombination of existing forms: exhibitors use the standard form of the multiplex to signify the “world-class” status of their up-to-date cinemas, while amateur technicians rely on widely used antennas, wires, and protocols to plug into existing internet infrastructure. Conversely, modification calls on the ability to adapt given materials (including technologies, practices, ideas, and senses of self) to prevailing conditions: theatre chains grapple with issues of urban development, audiences, and taste cultures as they develop new sites in new locales, while communities adapt technology to the resources they have, the landscapes they inhabit, and the histories they share to make their projects work. In these and other examples, media forge the channels along which modular elements can be disseminated and within which opportunities for modification take root.

Considering these concepts as an entry point for the study of media in space immediately conjures associations with Michel de Certeau’s opposition between strategy and tactics. If modularity offers the opportunity to expand the “proper place” of the powerful and extend the imposed terrain on which the subjected must move, modification suggests the potential to rework that terrain along tactical lines. The modularity of communication infrastructures and media forms might suggest narratives of spatial and temporal compression and, in turn, buttress colonial narratives that render distant, foreign spaces more legible, accessible, or profitable for powerful interests. Conversely, the modification of modular media genres, formats, technologies, and environments evokes profuse examples of narratives of localized or regionalized difference, adaptation, resistance, and even refusal.

Such associations between modularity, modification, power, and resistance do not hold seamlessly, and are useful only to the extent that they are contextualized and questioned. Media scholarship that engages in this work does not necessarily dispense with familiar associations with these concepts but expose the frictions and counternarratives that arise out of close, critical analysis. Reconsidering these associations raises questions including: What are productive ways of conceptualizing modification without fetishizing neoliberal concepts of ingenuity that displace the responsibilities of media institutions and telecommunications services onto individuals? How might we understand corporate modularity as involving forms of differentiation that enable flows of capital and hegemony? Where can we see the activities of user or audience modification being channeled or controlled by powerful interests? In what ways does modularity emerge from individuals, social groups, and communities rather than being imposed on them? Can we uncover or recover cases that subvert binaries associating modularity with the homogenous, the corporate, and the global and modification with the heterogenous, the individual, and the local?

The Media Fields Editorial Collective in the Department of Film and Media at the University of California, Santa Barbara seeks papers that interrogate the imbrication of modularity and modification in spatial practices and imaginaries and put forward thought-provoking examples of how they might be operationalized in the service of today’s media scholarship.

Potential paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Technological standards and standardization
  • Circulating genres and formats
  • Digital “modding”
  • Film and television “packaging”
  • Franchises, sequels, spinoffs, ripoffs, and reboots
  • Platform systems and their users
  • Communication infrastructures and their nodes
 
 
Mary Michael and Charlotte Orzel
Issue Co-Editors
Media Fields Journal
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The Kardashians and Trans Femininity: Appropriation, Artificiality, and Racial Erasure”

Dossier for TSQ*Now

Edited by Dr. Laura Stamm (University of Pittsburgh)

 

With Keeping Up With the Kardashians ending after 19 seasons, it seems timely to reflect upon the ways in which the Kardashian aesthetic transformation has been influenced by (and appropriated) trans femininity. This dossier will ideally include both paranoid and reparative readings. For, as much as Kardashian femininity could not exist without trans femininity, perhaps there is a way in which the Kardashian women have also made trans femininity increasingly possible. What I mean is that the drag queen, trans feminine aesthetic that the Kardashian women have so spectacularly appropriated has also changed the way we conceive of cis femininity as tied to any sort of aesthetic of authenticity. Taken even further, could we create a genealogy of contemporary trans femininity through a reading of the Kardashians? How can we put questions of race at the center of this trans-femme-cis-femme circuit? 

 

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Critical race studies
  • Trans of color critique
  • TV studies
  • Drag culture
  • Body-as-technology critique
  • Personal narrative
  • Social media technology

 

I am seeking contributions for a dossier for TSQ*Now, an online forum on trans studies organized by the TSQ editorial collective. The forum allows scholars to respond to currents issues with more immediacy and flexibility than traditional academic publishing. I am interested in hearing from scholars of any rank, and I especially encourage trans scholars to submit.

 

Interested writers should submit a 150-200 word abstract and a brief bio with affiliation and contact information to laura.e.stamm@gmail.com by February 1st. I am also happy to answer any questions. 

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CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS
 

Queer Emergencies

An online symposium organized in conjunction with the Toronto Queer Film Festival
April 24 & 25, 2021

 

Proposal deadline: Jan 5, 2021  Submit proposals here.

Everyone is welcome to apply. All participants will be paid.

Confirmed keynote speaker:  Dean Spade with more TBA

 

The Toronto Queer Film Festival is seeking proposals for a symposium on the theme of Queer Emergencies that aims to address queer, trans, and two-spirit experiences and challenges in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

This is a landmark time for humanity. Homebound and with resources dwindling, many of us continue to create art and engage in solidarity practices from within our communities. Queer Emergencies celebrates the resilience, resistance and creativity of our community in its response to the intense pressures and transformations wrought by the global pandemic. It seeks to engage work that is vital in this moment, speaking to the unique challenges that precarious and marginalized queer and trans communities are facing today. 

We’ve noticed a prevailing capitalist logic to the disbursement of resources, while artists are incurring losses of incomes and/or assets due to the economic contraction caused by widespread social distancing measures. Current structuring of funds prioritizes the privileged among us, leaving most people who were already struggling with few to no resources. 

The Queer Emergencies 2021 Symposium asks the question: what are our current limitations and how can we work within them in creative ways?  What are the issues facing queer, trans and two-spirit communities in the current moment and how can we allow them to radicalize our collective future? 

As ever, TQFF’s mandate remains to decolonize queer and trans art and media histories and practices. This symposium seeks projects with a unique perspective who frame their work in a critical, anti-oppressive and future-bound model.

We are interested in papers, workshops, roundtables, readings, performances that critically engage and reckon with and through media and the arts.

 

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Queer and/or Indigenous histories of organizing and reisistence to public health crises

  • Anti-racism/decolonization in artistic practices and/or arts organizations

  • Unpacking inclusion & building social/class alliances and solidarity

  • Queer and/or Indigenous perspectives on climate emergency, both locally and beyond

  • Mutual aid & food justice

  • Solidarity & allyship both within the queer/trans/2S communities and beyond

  • Community resilience & self-care 

  • Envisioning the future of queer and trans resistance 

  • Queer and trans organizing and activism before, during and after COVID

  • Mental health and artistic production/practices during and after COVID

  • Queer/trans pandemic crip time: living and working with chronic illness and disability

  • Essential and abandoned: intersectional (anti-racism, decolonial, disability justice) approaches to the disproportionate impact of economic and public health failures on our queer/trans/2S communities

  • Coalitional organizing and solidarities: defunding the police, abolishing prisons, workplace safety, and envisioning a world where public health and art are prioritized over property, police, prisons, and imperial global militarism

  • Combatting, strategizing/organizing against, and documenting the present and future of genocide (pandemics, climate emergency, structured institutional/infrastructure neglect and abandonment)

  • Queer migrant justice: open borders, mass migration, and worldwide worker solidarity

  • Rent strikes, mass evictions, kangaroo “housing courts,” and housing for all 

 

While papers, roundtables, workshops, and other typical academic conference formats are welcomed, we especially encourage more creative formats including but not limited to: arts-based research, poster presentations, poetry, performances, music, readings, artist talks, and other presentation formats that innovate and encourage online participation. As a symposium organized with a film festival, we are particularly interested in contributions that engage in some way with queer and trans media and/or art practices.

As a grassroots organization embedded within our communities, the Toronto Queer Film Festival encourages contributions from folks across our community – not just academics embedded within universities, but also independent scholars, activists, artists, community members, and other people with lived experience that would provide valuable perspectives to discussions on global queer liberation art and media.

 

Everyone is welcome to apply.

Please submit the following information via our online form by Jan 5, 2021

  • Name

  • Institutional or other affiliation (if applicable)

  • Presentation format (i.e. paper, roundtable, workshop, creative)

  • Presentation title

  • 250 word abstract

  • Email address you can be contacted at

  • Accessibility needs

 

This symposium will be held online. We are particularly interested in submissions that take full advantage of the capabilities of online platforms. Individual papers and presentations should be no more than 15 minutes. Roundtables, workshops, panels, should be no more than 1 hour, including opportunity for Q&A. We will also accept submission for proposals with shorter durations (i.e. lightning talks, microsessions, etc).

Only selected participants will be notified.

Selected participants will be notified of their acceptance by January 30, 2021

 

ABOUT THE TORONTO QUEER FILM FESTIVAL

TQFF is a registered not-for profit organization formed and run by an ad-hoc collective of artists and arts professionals who came together in 2016 to launch the Toronto Queer Film Festival. We began this project out of an urgent need to provide screen space in Toronto for media by and about marginalized queer and trans people.

 

We have three primary mandates:

1) to exhibit queer independent and experimental film and video art;

2) to support the production of alternative queer film and video art through community-based arts education and professional development; and

3) to foster community engagement with the arts by welcoming all attendees to our accessible venues with “pay what you can” pricing for events, ASL interpretation, and closed captioning of all programs.

 

TQFF distinguishes itself from other Toronto cultural events that serve the LGBT community by focusing on experimental time-based media that challenges and expands social, political, and artistic conventions. Our curatorial mandate is to centre the programming of work by and about queer and trans people of colour, Indigenous people, and people with disabilities, as well as the work of local artists, low-income, DIY filmmakers, and emerging artists.

 

You can read more about TQFF on our website: https://torontoqueerfilmfest.com/about/

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Call for Submissions: Special Issue on “Critical and Creative Engagements with Petro-Media”

Guest edited by Rachel W. Jekanowski (Memorial University) & Emily Roehl (Texas State University)

 

Submission Deadline: December 10, 2020

This special issue of Imaginations will concentrate on media engaging with petroleum and its attendant socio-political and economic structures. Drawing on technology and media studies, energy humanities scholarship, and a range of methods in visual and cultural studies, the contributors will theorize contemporary and historical uses of media to resist and facilitate petroleum infrastructures. Building on Imaginations’ long-standingengagement with petrocultures scholarship, including their 2012 special issue “Sighting Oil” (Sheena Wilson and Andrew Pendakis, eds.), this issue will mobilize critiques of corporate petro-media with decolonial methods from a range of disciplines, focusing on the interlacing of oil, settler colonialism, Indigenous resurgence, and media production. The issue will consist of peer-reviewed essays from scholars and practitioners, artist interviews and contributions (including samples of multimedia work with accompanying artists statements), and a review section (including a comparative book review essay, curatorial reviews and responses to digital exhibitions in the age of COVID-19, etc.). We are particularly invested in featuring research-creation and media-rich scholarship.

We invite submissions that take up different facets of media production by Indigenous, immigrant, and settler artists, activists, and corporate representatives to examine the complex entanglements of cultural production, settler colonialism, and fossil fuel extraction. Given our location on occupied Indigenous territories where we work as researchers and educators, we assert that energy developments are always already implicated within histories of colonialism and white settlement in North America. Critically, we invite contributions that include and foreground visual media in their

analyses, featuring original videos, archival photographs and film stills, and photographs of authors’ art installations.

We invite submissions that engage with the following topics (including but not limited to):

  • the way media networks and ways of viewing the world support the extraction, production, and consumption of fossil fuels and interact with the financial and socio-political systems the production of oil requires;
  • the way media, like energy infrastructures, are used as conduits for the transportation and transmission of fuel, people, capital, and ideas about sovereignty, identity, futurity, and relationships to the nonhuman world;
  • the way various media—from corporate films, digital photography, games, and television advertisements, to activist protests and social media—have alternatively been used to uphold, legitimize, critique, and resist energy practices within settler colonial nations like Canada and the United States.

Submissions are also welcome from the following fields and approaches (including but not limited to):

  • cultural studies
  • energy studies
  • critical Indigenous studies
  • critical settler colonial studies
  • decolonial approaches to media
  • environmental humanities
  • Indigenous sovereignty
  • film and media studies
  • literary studies
  • multimedia and digital arts
  • petrocultures
  • research-creation methods
  • social and environmental justice
  • feminist, queer, and posthumanist approaches to petro-media interventions from critical race studies

In sum, this special issue will contribute to discussions within media and literature studies about the imbrication of energy, communication, and art, while foregrounding Indigenous resurgence, energy justice movements, and deepening attention to the asymmetrical effects of climate change on communities and environments.

Submission Guidelines

Recognizing the challenges of producing work during a pandemic, and reflecting the editors’ commitment to experimenting with mixed methodologies and media-rich scholarship, this special issue will feature shorter research essays alongside artist submissions and research-creation. Research essays should be 3000-5000 words; artist contributions and curatorial reviews can be 500-2000 words. Citations should adhere to the MLA Style Guide.

All submissions must be sent to imaginations@ualberta.ca and copied to mrln@yorku.ca and bbellamy@ualberta.ca. Please include a separate sheet with short biographical and contact information. Media can be emailed as an attachment or accessible by hyperlink.

Please see the full list of author submission guidelines available on the Imaginations Journal website. The Imaginations style sheet is accessible here.

Submission deadline is December 10, 2020.

We plan to notify contributors as to the status of their submissions by May 2021 at the latest. The special issue is tentatively planned for publication in Fall 2021.

Contact Us

Please direct questions and inquiries to issue editors Emily Roehl (e.a.roehl@gmail.com) and Rachel W. Jekanowski (rjekanowski@mun.ca).

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The Media Architecture Biennale (MAB) is the world’s premier event on media architecture, urban interaction design, and urban informatics. It brings together architects, artists and designers, leading thinkers on urban design, key industry and government representatives as well as community activists. Together, they explore the design and role of media in the built environment and its implications for urban communities and ecosystems.

MAB20 consists of a series of events, meet-ups and publications taking place on- and offline between March 2019 and July 2021. A final event including an award show, workshops and a conference with keynotes and an academic track, is scheduled from July 28th – July 2nd, 2021 to take place in Amsterdam and Utrecht.
 
The theme of MAB’s 6th edition is Futures Implied, which opens up investigations into future scenarios implied in today’s urban transformations and emerging technologies like digital platforms, responsive technologies and smart city promises. How can we shape technologies and spaces to respond to their surroundings, contributing to cities that are both socially and ecologically sustainable? The point of departure is that technologies are never neutral enablers, they are built upon numerous spoken and unspoken assumptions about urban life, each with their own implications for both social relations as well as their effect on the natural ecosystem.

We invite papers from academics, students, and industry practitioners that align with the theme 
“Futures Implied” and the sub-themes: “Playful & Artistic Civic Engagement”“The Aesthetics and Poetics of Responsive Urban Spaces”“Restorative Cities”, “More-than-Human-Cities”, and “Citizens’ digital rights in the era of platform ecologies.” Paper contributions should address current practices, discuss theoretical approaches, or present novel research that explore and further develop our understanding of media architecture through relevant case studies, design processes, and community and industry examples.

Deadline: January 25th, 2021
Notification of acceptance: 29 March, 2021
All revisions due & Camera Ready: 24 May, 2021
Click Here for more info >>
 

MAB20 is organized by the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and the [urban interfaces] group at Utrecht University, in collaboration with the Media Architecture Institute.

Join the MAB-Community on  Facebook  |  Instagram  |  Twitter  |  LinkedIn

For more information, visit www.mab.org or contact us via info@mab20.org

 
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Job Title:
Assistant Professor (tenure-track), Black Anglophone Literature

Department:
UBCO | Faculty | Department of English and Cultural Studies | Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies (Michael Treschow)

Posting End Date:
January 16, 2021.

Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies
Department of English and Cultural Studies
Black Anglophone Literature

The Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies (FCCS) at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus in Kelowna invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor (research stream) position in Black Anglophone Literature. Additional expertise in one or more of the following areas would be an asset: Black transatlantic studies; Black Indigenous literatures; relevant national literatures (e.g., Caribbean, African, American, and/or Canadian); concepts of place and location; early modern literature; 18th-century literature; modernism; speculative fiction; electronic literature; Afro-futurism; environmental literatures; and life-writing. The position will be held in the Department of English and Cultural Studies and will begin on July 1, 2021.

Candidates must have a completed Ph.D. or equivalent (or provide solid indication of imminent completion) in English or a closely related field. Applicants must have an active scholarly profile and demonstrate a record of, or potential for, high quality teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The successful candidate will be expected to maintain an active program of research, teaching, graduate supervision, and service, and to engage with the interdisciplinary nature of the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies.  Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies offers both discipline-based and interdisciplinary programs at the undergraduate and graduate level across a wide range of subject areas in the humanities and fine arts. The English program within FCCS offers a wide variety of courses in areas such as indigenous literatures, postcolonial literatures, media studies, ecocriticism, critical and cultural theory, and the digital humanities. The ideal candidate will also have a strong commitment to Indigenous engagement. As part of the University’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, UBC Okanagan has committed to supporting and implementing five key commitments, which can be found at https://ok.ubc.ca/about/indigenous-engagement/. FCCS seeks to build on its commitments to anti-racist pedagogies, expressed in the prominent place of race and race studies in courses ranging from postcolonial literature to the poetry and prose of the 17th century; to cultural safety training for faculty in relation to Indigenous pedagogies; and to our recent curriculum developments aimed at supporting UBC’s institution-wide emphasis on the Indigenization of our degrees.   For a full list of our programs, please consult the Faculty’s web page at https://fccs.ok.ubc.ca/.

Application materials must include the following:  A letter of application, complete curriculum vitae, statement of teaching philosophy, evidence or record of teaching effectiveness, research plan, and examples of scholarly research. 

In addition, applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference sent directly by Dr. Michael Treschow, Head, Department of English and Cultural Studies at recruitment.fccs@ubc.ca with the subject line “Black Anglophone Literature.  Informal enquiries may be made to Dr. Michael Treschow at michael.treschow@ubc.ca

Review of applications will begin soon after January 15, 2021 and will continue until the position is filled.

This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

To apply: https://ubc.wd10.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/ubcfacultyjobs/job/UBC-Okanagan-Campus/Assistant-Professor–tenure-track—Black-Anglophone-Literature_JR372

 

The Department of Theatre and Film at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver campus, seeks to make a full-time appointment in the field of Film Studies at the rank of Assistant Professor of Teaching, tenure-track, with responsibility for teaching undergraduate courses, developing curriculum, and other relevant educational leadership and service in the B.A. in Film Studies program.  Situated on the beautiful Point Grey campus on the traditional ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people in the culturally diverse city of Vancouver, the Department of Theatre and Film offers a full range of undergraduate and graduate programs in Theatre and Film Studies and Practice, which include BA, MA and PhD degrees in Film, and Cinema and Media Studies.

We seek an exceptional teacher with a track record of employing innovative pedagogies, such as community-based learning, flexible and/or online learning, and curriculum/program design. Mentoring of graduate teaching assistants is a significant aspect of the position. The successful candidate will be expected to maintain an excellent record of teaching, service, and educational leadership. An ability to teach Media Studies courses would be a secondary asset. The successful candidate will be the BA Film Studies Advisor and generate ideas to oversee its curriculum development.

Applicants for the position should have a Ph.D. in Cinema Studies or Film Studies (or provide solid indication of completion before July 2021); possess exceptional organizational and leadership skills; provide evidence of or potential for teaching excellence and experience in Film Studies at the undergraduate level; have had experience preparing teaching materials independently or collaboratively; and  have a a strong track record of team work and engagement. Experience in program coordination is an asset.

The normal teaching load of an Assistant Professor of Teaching is six 3-credit courses over the academic year. Courses will range from first- to fourth-year undergraduate courses. Course sizes range from 120 students in FIST 100 (Introduction to Film Studies), to 40 students in FIST 200 (Introduction to Canadian Cinema) to 25 in FIST 331 (Introduction to Film Theory). Duties would also include individual supervision of BA Honours essay students, and mentoring graduate students editing the program’s film journal Cinephile.

The successful candidate will be expected to work closely with other tenure-stream Film Studies faculty in related areas of teaching and research, and with any future hires in the area.

As this is a tenure-track position in the Educational Leadership stream, the successful candidate will be reviewed for reappointment, tenure, and promotion in subsequent years, in accordance with the Collective Agreement. For a description of the Assistant Professor of Teaching rank and criteria for reappointment and promotion, visit: http://www.hr.ubc.ca/faculty-relations/collective-agreements/appointment-faculty/.

The application dossier should include: application letter, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching effectiveness (e.g. sample syllabi, evaluations, etc.) , and a one-page statement about your experience working with a diverse student body and your contributions or potential contributions to creating/advancing a culture of equity and inclusion.  

In addition, applicants should arrange for three confidential letters of recommendation, at least two of whom should have seen the applicant teach a class.

The deadline for receipt of complete applications is January 8, 2021. The anticipated start date of employment is July 1, 2021.

All application materials should be submitted electronically through the Department’s careers website: https://thfl.air.arts.ubc.ca/?p=530 .  

To learn more about our Department, check out our website: https://theatrefilm.ubc.ca

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

This position is subject to final budgetary approval.  Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. 

Given the uncertainty caused by the global COVID-19 pandemic, applicants must be prepared to conduct interviews remotely if circumstances require. A successful applicant may be asked to consider an offer containing a deadline without having been able to make an in-person visit to campus if travel and other restrictions are still in place.