Posts by: webmaster
Nonhuman Artists: Challenging Anthropocentrism in Art History

Ninth Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium
Organized by the Graduate Union of the Students of Arts
Online and In Person, University of Toronto

Keynote Address: Rebecca Zorach, Northwestern University

The Graduate Union of the Students of Art (GUStA) at the University of Toronto is pleased to present the Ninth Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium in cooperation with the Department of Art History.

In art history, notions of artistic creation, identity, and agency are often underpinned by an anthropocentric framework that hampers critical reflection on non-human actors in the making and circulation of images and artefacts. This symposium seeks to explore non-anthropocentric perspectives to artistic practice by confronting the ‘animal’, ‘inorganic’, or even ‘divine’ limits of art-making, and examining the degree to which the works of art both past and present continue to be shaped by agencies and currents of power that resist or exceed human control. We encourage submissions from students and scholars working on visual and material culture in any period or region, as well as those engaging with theoretical insights in eco-criticism, history of science and technology, media theory, archaeology and anthropology.

Examples of research area include, but are not limited to:

  • anthropocentrism in art history
  • political agency of animals in art
  • the limit between art and nature, organic and inorganic in art-making (nature as painter/artist/artisan, lusus naturae, nature print, photography)
  • indigenous place-thought and land-based consciousness
  • the limits of notions such as agency, intentionality, and consciousness and meaningful ways to articulate agency, consciousness or thought proper to images and artefacts
  • material agency; artists ‘listening’ to what their work/material/tool ‘wants’
  • analogies between the artist and their tools (retina/lens, finger/brush, etc.)
  • diverse strategies used to circumvent or relinquish human agency, intention, or willpower in art-making (Acheiropoieta, role of accident and chance, automatism and the unconscious
  • art generated by new digital technologies (e.g. Google Lens, Deep Dream Generator)
  • the dehumanization of artists in political, ideological and colonial contexts

The Ninth Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium takes place on March 18, 2022. To allow for flexibility amid ongoing pandemic, the symposium will be arranged in a hybrid format, with in-person meeting held at Hart House, St. George Campus. Speakers participating online have the option of presenting live or submitting a pre-recorded presentation. Presentations are 20 minutes in length, followed by a live discussion period. We will be requesting submissions of completed manuscripts for publication in the symposium proceedings.

Please submit 250-word paper abstracts accompanied by a 100-word bio (.doc/.docx/.pdf) to the Graduate Union of the Students of Art at gustasymposium@utoronto.ca by February 4, 2022, at 5 PM ET. If you would like to submit a request for an organized panel session consisting of three papers, please ask all authors in the session to submit individual abstracts and send us a separate email containing the names and email addresses of all session speakers. Applicants will receive email notification no later than Friday, February 25, 2022, at 5PM ET.

For more information, please visit https://gustasymposium.wordpress.com. Queries regarding submissions should be directed to gustasymposium@utoronto.ca

 

The 2022 John Douglas Taylor Conference committee at McMaster University welcomes interdisciplinary proposals for presentations for Diasporic Solidarities: Islands, Intimacies, and Imagining Otherwise. Conference presentations should engage with the complexities of constellating solidarities in so-called North America and in relation to historical and contemporary transnational flows of people, information, and capital with particular focus on the island (including land, movement to-from-and-away, Turtle Island, and more). The conference format will be virtual and synchronous via Zoom webinar. The two-day conference program features a plenary session and several research panel presentations.

Conference Dates: June 9-10, 2022

Please see the full CFP on our website: diasporicsolidarities.ca/cfp

Please submit 150-word proposal and 75-word bio to jdtcon@mcmaster.ca

Proposal Submission Deadline: January 20, 2022

 

The Department of Communication, Media and Film (CMF) in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Calgary invites applications for a Canada Research Chair (CRC) Tier II in Race, Social Justice and Digital Media. The successful candidate will be appointed at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure- track) or Associate Professor(with tenure) and will be nominated for a CRC Tier II. The successful candidate will have a PhD in Communication, Media Studies or closely related field. The anticipated start date is 1 July 2022. 

Tier II Chairs are intended for exceptional emerging scholars (i.e., candidates must have been an active researcher in their field for fewer than 10 years at the time of nomination) and provide protected time and other supports for research. Candidates who are more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree and who have had career breaks, such as maternity, parental, or extended sick leave, clinical training, and research interruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, etc., may have their eligibility for a Tier II Chair assessed through the program’s Tier II justification process. Please contact UCalgary’s Office of Research Services for more information: ipd@ucalgary.ca. Further information about the Canada Research Chairs Program can be found on the Government of Canada’s CRC website [https://www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca/home-accueil-eng.aspx], including eligibility criteria.

The Chair will establish an active research program that leads to peer-reviewed scholarly publications and external grant funding, and is aligned with the strategic plans of the Faculty of Arts and the University of Calgary. The incumbent will be an emerging scholar identifying with the general area of Race, Social Justice and Digital Media, and demonstrating excellence in research in one (or both) of the following specializations:  
     i.    Activism and digital media: This area of focus attends to user practices that engage digital media in anti-racist activism and organizing. Research in this area may address issues of anti-racist digital communities and publics; emergent socio-technical practices such as hashtagging; and/or intersectional historical analyses of these practices. 
     ii.    Digital design justice: This area of focus attends to the production contexts of digital media in order to better understand how digital media operates as racialized technology. Research in this area may address issues of racial bias in platform, app, and software design; critical studies of algorithms and data; and/or digital surveillance.

The Chair will develop cutting edge research that addresses the grand challenge of decolonizing digital media. By engaging media and mediation processes as an integral aspect of (de)colonization, this research will create vital and timely new knowledge about the possibilities for, and limitations of, digital platforms, social media, and online activisms to “un-settle” the logics of racial inequality out of which they emerge. 

The Chair will also play an important role in teaching and research supervision of students in CMF’s undergraduate and graduate programs. Service to the department, faculty, University, and community is also expected. The Chair will have the opportunity to be part of a prolific and diverse research environment in CMF, with access to state of the art core infrastructure. Outstanding opportunities for collaboration are available with established research programs in feminist media studies, media activism, environmental media, and film studies.

The successful candidate at the Assistant Professor level must have a record of high-quality peer-reviewed publications, external research funding, and effectiveness in teaching at the University level. The successful candidate at the Associate Professor level must have an established body of high-quality peer reviewed publications, external research funding, effectiveness in teaching at the University level, and evidence of effective graduate student supervision (where possible).

The Department of Communication, Media and Film is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. We value interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourage collaboration. For more information about the Department of Communication, Media and Film please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/communication-media-film.

Interested individuals are encouraged to submit an application online via the ‘Apply Now’ link here: https://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/8242017-canada-research-chair-tier-ii-in-race-social-justice-and-digital-media-department-of-communication-media-and-film Please be aware that the application process allows for only four attachments. Your four application attachments should be organized to contain the following (which may require you to merge documents, such as publications):

  • Cover letter and curriculum vitae, including the name and contact information of three referees 
  • Statement of research interests and two samples of peer-reviewed work that demonstrates scholarly expertise
  • A teaching dossier that includes a statement of teaching philosophy, a record of teaching experience, sample syllabi and evidence of teaching effectiveness
  • An equity, diversity, inclusion (EDI) statement identifying the applicant’s contributions or potential contributions to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion on the basis of lived experience and understanding of racialized groups

Review of applications will begin on Feb. 15, 2022 and continue until the position is filled. 

Questions may be addressed to: 
Dr. Charles Tepperman, Department Head
Department of Communication, Media and Film
c.tepperman@ucalgary.ca 

The University of Calgary has launched an institution-wide Indigenous Strategy in line with the foundational goals of Eyes High, committing to creating a rich, vibrant, and culturally competent campus that welcomes and supports Indigenous Peoples, encourages Indigenous community partnerships, is inclusive of Indigenous perspectives in all that we do.

The University of Calgary recognizes that a diverse staff/faculty benefits and enriches the work, learning and research experiences of the entire campus and greater community. We are committed to removing barriers that have been historically encountered by some people in our society. We strive to recruit individuals who will further enhance our diversity and will support their academic and professional success while they are here; in particular, we encourage members of equity-deserving groups  (women, Indigenous People, persons with disabilities,  members of visible minorities and diverse sexual orientation and gender identities) to apply. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however in appropriate circumstances, preference in hiring may be accorded to candidates from the groups noted above. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, priority will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents. To ensure a fair and equitable assessment, we offer accommodation at any stage during the recruitment process to applicants with disabilities. Questions regarding diversity or requests for accommodation can be sent to Human Resources (hrhire@ucalgary.ca).

The University of Calgary recognizes that candidates have varying career paths and that career interruptions can be part of an excellent academic record. Candidates are encouraged but not required to provide any relevant information about their experience and/or career interruptions to allow for a fair assessment of their application. Selection committees have been instructed to give careful consideration to, and be sensitive to the impact of career interruptions, when assessing the candidate’s research productivity.

Additional Information

To learn more about academic opportunities at the University of Calgary and all we have to offer, view our Academic Careers website. For more information about the Faculty of Arts visit Careers in the Faculty of Arts.

COVIDSafe Campus Strategy

The University has implemented a new Vaccination Directive that requires all faculty and staff to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by January 1, 2022. You will be required to upload proof of vaccination prior to commencing your duties. Please review the COVIDSafe Campus website for further information and access to additional resources.

About the University of Calgary
 
The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to be recognized as one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. The University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.
 
About Calgary, Alberta

Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and has been named one of the world’s most livable cities for years. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 https://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/8242017-canada-research-chair-tier-ii-in-race-social-justice-and-digital-media-department-of-communication-media-and-film

 

The Faculty of Arts, Department of Communication, Media and Film invites applications for a tenure track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, in the area of Critical Media Practice. The anticipated start date is 1 July 2022.

The successful candidate will establish an active research program that leads to peer-reviewed scholarly publications and external grant funding, teach graduate and undergraduate courses in their area of specialization in addition to a wide range of courses in the programs of Communication and Media Studies and/or Film Studies, contribute to the graduate program, participate in the affairs of the department and faculty, and engage with the wider community.

A PhD in Communications, Media Studies, Visual Culture, Digital Media, Cinema and Media Arts or a related field is required by the time of appointment. 

We seek a colleague who is a media maker-scholar, whose work falls into the area of critical media practice, exploring the intersections between theory, history, and media/film making. Primary responsibilities include teaching courses in media and/or film studies and media production. Applications are invited across a range of specializations in digital media practice and research, including (but not limited to) emerging media; critical race and/or postcolonial perspectives on film and media; documentary media; queer media; interactive narratives; maker culture; podcasting; activist media, software and platform studies; game studies and design; creative coding; disability and media. The successful candidate will help create new opportunities for students to learn about media making as part of their critical studies degree by developing courses in their areas of interest. 

The successful candidate must display evidence of excellence in research, creative activity, and teaching. Candidates may demonstrate excellence in research through peer-reviewed publications and/or exhibitions. The successful candidate will have a strong track record of creative activity as demonstrated through exhibition or publication of digital media, which may include community presentations, festival presentations, awards and accolades, peer-reviewed performances, and/or web-based or professional production. Applicants should demonstrate potential for establishing a strong record of research productivity and successfully securing external grants. Experience with community engagement in research and teaching is an asset. The successful candidate will demonstrate the potential for excellence in teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. We are especially interested in qualified candidates who can contribute to equity, diversity and inclusion through their teaching, research, creative activity, and service.

The Department of Communication, Media and Film is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. We value interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourage collaboration. For more information about the Department of Communication, Media and Film please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/communication-media-film.

Interested individuals are encouraged to submit an application online via the ‘Apply Now’ link here: https://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/8242016-assistant-professor-critical-media-practice-department-of-communication-media-and-film Please be aware that the application process allows for only four attachments. Your four application attachments should be organized to contain the following (which may require you to merge documents, such as publications): 

  • Cover letter and curriculum vitae, including the name and contact information of three referees 
  • A research/creative work dossier that includes two samples of scholarly work and links to recent media works with accompanying maker statements
  • A teaching dossier that includes a statement of teaching philosophy, a record of teaching experience, and evidence of teaching effectiveness
  • An equity, diversity, inclusion (EDI) statement identifying the applicant’s contributions or potential contributions to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion on the basis of lived experience and understanding of racialized groups.

Review of applications will begin on Feb. 15, 2022 and continue until the position is filled. 

Questions may be addressed to: 
Dr. Charles Tepperman, Department Head
Department of Communication, Media and Film
c.tepperman@ucalgary.ca 

The University of Calgary has launched an institution-wide Indigenous Strategy in line with the foundational goals of Eyes High, committing to creating a rich, vibrant, and culturally competent campus that welcomes and supports Indigenous Peoples, encourages Indigenous community partnerships, is inclusive of Indigenous perspectives in all that we do.

The University of Calgary recognizes that a diverse staff/faculty benefits and enriches the work, learning and research experiences of the entire campus and greater community. We are committed to removing barriers that have been historically encountered by some people in our society. We strive to recruit individuals who will further enhance our diversity and will support their academic and professional success while they are here. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To learn more about academic opportunities at the University of Calgary and all we have to offer, view our Academic Careers website. For more information about the Faculty of Arts visit Careers in the Faculty of Arts.

COVIDSafe Campus Strategy

The University has implemented a new Vaccination Directive that requires all faculty and staff to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by January 1, 2022. You will be required to upload proof of vaccination prior to commencing your duties. Please review the COVIDSafe Campus website for further information and access to additional resources.

About the University of Calgary
 
The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to be recognized as one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. The University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.
 
About Calgary, Alberta

Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and has been named one of the world’s most livable cities for years. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 https://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/8242016-assistant-professor-critical-media-practice-department-of-communication-media-and-film

 

CALL FOR PAPERS for a Special Issue of Studies in World Cinema
Elemental World Cinema
Guest editors: Tiago de Luca and Matilda Mroz

Recent strands of ecocriticism have stressed the urgency in thinking about the environment on the basis of its elemental constitution rather than an amorphous ‘nature’ supposedly separate from humans (Macauley 2010; Cohen & Duckert 2015; Peters 2015). Superseded by atomism and particle physics, the four elements – air, earth, fire and water – reappear in these accounts as more concrete entities with which to recalibrate our interaction with the natural world in the so-called Anthropocene. This is the case especially as such elements have become the harbingers and carriers of ecological catastrophe in the form of atmospheric pollution, water contamination, uncontrollable mega-fires and land devastation. Inspired by this research, this special issue of Studies in World Cinema will investigate cinema’s interaction with the natural elements, and in so doing forge a much needed conversation between the fields of world cinema and ecocinema (Willoquet-Maricondi 2010; Rust et al. 2013; Ivakhiv 2013).

Cinema and the elements are indissolubly entwined. As John Durham Peters (2015) notes, the current concept of media as informational and communicational technologies obscures the fact that, up into the nineteenth century, the word medium was used to describe the natural elements as dynamic vessels and environments that sustain existence. The elements are always moving. For this very reason, when the first technological mass medium emerged at the end of that century – that is to say, cinema – it immediately nurtured an obsession with recording elemental shapes and forms: rippling waves, swirling dust, swaying foliage, as well as tornados, floods, cyclones and earthquakes. Whether in its gentle or ferocious manifestations, elemental vitalism asserted cinema’s medium-specific ability to capture the infinitely shape-shifting vagaries of motion (Schonig 2018; Beugnet 2017).

But cinema, as we know, would not be content with merely recording the world. Swiftly turned into a medium that builds story worlds, it began to artificially recreate the environment in purposefully built studios, channelling elements as resources for artificially created weather systems (McKim 2013; Fay 2018) and leaving its own ‘cinematic footprint’ (Bozak 2012) behind. This oscillation between capturing and fabricating, depending and acting upon the elements underpins the entire history of cinema, and yet an elemental history of world cinema is yet to be written.

This special issue hopes to contribute to such a task. It proposes to bring to the fore elements often deemed peripheral or ‘incidental’ (Vaughan 1999) to human action, a figure-ground reversal that can help us decentre humanity within the cinematic sensorium and imaginary. On the other hand, world cinema history is replete with films that have foregrounded and/or thematised the four elements, whether separately or combined. From Joris Ivens’s Rain (1929) to Alexander Dovzhenko’s Earth (1930), from Amir Naderi’s Water, Wind, Dust (1989) to Deepa Mehta’s elemental trilogy ( Fire, 1996; Earth, 1999; Water, 2005), from Andrei Tarkovsky (Bird 2008) to Naomi Kawase, from contemporary ‘slow cinema’ to ‘green’ documentaries, the elements make themselves present in cinematic world-making in a variety of utopian and dystopian configurations, and through diverse modes, genres and traditions. In its call for a rewriting of film history from an elemental standpoint, this special issue hopes to reconfigure the often abstract worldhood of world cinema into the very physical world we inhabit and upon which we – and cinema – depend for elementary survival.

We invite contributions related, but not exclusive to, the following topics:

  • Early cinema and the four elements
  • Cinema’s extraction of elemental resources
  • Cinema’s recording of elemental manifestations
  • Cinema’s fabrication of elemental processes
  • Philosophical approaches to elemental figurations in the cinema
  • The elements as harbingers of environmental collapse
  • Elemental activism and environmental (in)justice
  • Material feminisms and eco-feminist theory and filmmaking
  • Indigenous ecocinemas and philosophies
  • The elements and the Anthropocene in world cinema

Timeline for contributions:
Proposals, consisting of a title and a 3/400-word abstract + a short author’s bio, should be sent to t.de-luca@warwick.ac.uk and matilda.mroz@sydney.edu.au prior to 31 January 2022. Notifications of acceptance or non-acceptance will be sent out in late February.
The submission deadline for accepted, full articles (max 8,000 words) is 1 August 2022. All contributions will undergo double-blind peer review. Publication is planned for late spring 2023.
Any queries should be addressed to Tiago de Luca and Matilda Mroz (t.de-luca@warwick.ac.uk and matilda.mroz@sydney.edu.au).

Works cited:

  • Beugnet, Martine (2017) ‘Introduction’ in Martine Beugnet, Allan Cameron and Arild Fetveit (eds) Indefinite Visions: Cinema and the Attractions of Uncertainty. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 1-13.
  • Bird, Robert (2008) Andrei Tarkovsky: Elements of Cinema. London: Reaktion Books.
  • Bozak, Nadia (2012) The Cinematic Footprint: Lights, Camera, Natural Resources. New Brunswick, New Jersey and London: Rutgers University Press.
  • Cohen, Jerome Jeffrey and Duckert, Lowell (eds.) (2015) Elemental Ecocriticism: Thinking with Earth, Air, Water, and Fire. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Fay, Jennifer (2018) Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Ivakhiv, Adrian J. (2013) Ecologies of the Moving Image: Cinema, Affect, Nature. Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
  • Macauley, David (2010) Elemental Philosophy: Earth, Air, Fire, and Water as Environmental Ideas. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.
  • McKim, Kristi (2013) Cinema as Weather: Stylistic Screens and Atmospheric Change. New York: Routledge.
  • Peters, John Durham (2015) The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.
  • Rust, Stephen, Salma Monani and Sean Cubitt (eds.) (2013) Ecocinema Theory and Practice. New York and London: Routledge.
  • Schonig, Jordan (2018) ‘Contingent Motion: Rethinking the “Wind in the Trees” in Early Cinema and CGI’, Discourse 40:1, pp. 30–61
  • Vaughan, Dai (1999) For Documentary: Twelve Essays. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Willoquet-Maricondi, Paula (ed.) (2010) Framing the World: Explorations in Ecocriticism and Film. Charlottesville and London: University of Virginia Press.
 

Call for Applications
MA in Film Studies
Carleton University-Canada’s Capital University.
Ottawa, ON  

Carleton University’s Film Studies Program invites applications to its MA program for the 2022-2023 academic year. Applications received by February 1, 2022, will receive priority consideration. Admission decisions will be made by late February-early March. The Program may consider late applications.  

Carleton University’s Film Studies program is a student-centered, globally focused, and interdisciplinary program that teaches critical, theoretical, and historical approaches to cinema and emerging media. Students learn to think analytically and express themselves clearly while developing specialized knowledge about history, aesthetics, and film as a social and cultural practice. Our internationally recognized faculty are engaged in innovative research with numerous books, articles, grants, and awards to their credit. Our program offers a collegial, supportive, and student-friendly atmosphere conducive to success, with a faculty committed to student mentorship.

Areas of faculty expertise include world cinema (e.g. the cinemas of Africa, Asia, Scandinavia, Western Europe, Canada, and the United States), film theory and philosophy, film history, documentary film, and media, Indigenous film and media, video games and new media, queer and transgender media, and sound studies.

Our program welcomes applications from students with an undergraduate degree in Film Studies and cognate disciplines such as Communication, Journalism, Art History, Music, Literature, Indigenous and Canadian Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, History, etc. Students may supplement their studies with a specialization in African Studies,  the Digital Humanities, or pursue a Graduate Diploma in Curatorial Studies.

During their studies, students may qualify for internships which provide them with practical film- and media-related experience and opportunities to work with Ottawa-area arts institutions, companies, and associations including film festivals (Canadian Film Institute, Ottawa International Animation Festival, InsideOut Ottawa LGBT Film Festival, One World Film Festival, Digi60 Filmmakers’ Festival), archives and museums (Library and Archives Canada, Ingenium: Canada’s Museums of Science & Innovation, Carleton’s Audio-Visual Resource Centre) and film production and exhibition facilities (SAW Video Media Art Centre, Independent Film Cooperative of Ottawa).

Carleton University offers generous and highly competitive funding packages. Admission funding may take the form of one or more of the following: Teaching Assistantships (TAships), Domestic Entrance Scholarships, Merit Scholarships, Donor-Funded Awards Research Assistantships (RA), etc.

Established in 1977, Carleton’s Film Studies is one of the oldest programs in Canada. Members of our faculty helped found the discipline’s professional society, the Film Studies Association of Canada, and have held various offices over the years. Three past presidents of FSAC are members of our faculty, and the association’s journal, The Canadian Journal of Film Studies, was recently housed at Carleton. Present and past members of faculty also serve or have served on the editorial boards of Camera Obscura, JCMS: The Journal of Cinema and Media Studies, Revue Cinémas, Animation Journal, Studies in French Cinema, Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, The Soundtrack, Film History, Performance Matters and Positif, etc.

Carleton University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within its community as a source of excellence, cultural enrichment, and social strength. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our University including, but not limited to: women; visible minorities; First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples; persons with disabilities; and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity and expressions

For more information please visit our website: https://carleton.ca/filmstudies/. For questions, please contact Dr. Aboubakar Sanogo, Graduate Supervisor at aboubakar.sanogo@carleton.ca.

 

 

Pre-Constituted Panel Calls for Abstracts

Panel proposals for The Annual Conference of the Film Studies Association of Canada (FSAC), May 12-15, 2022. Please review the pre-constituted panel call for abstracts below. If you are interested in applying for any of them send the required abstract and bio to the specific panel chair by January 15th.

Each panel chair will inform you of their decision by January 25th and the abstracts they have selected to be included in their final submission will be sent to the Conference Committee on January 31

If your paper is not selected for the panel you have applied for you are welcome to submit it as an individual paper for the January 31 deadline (see the larger 2022 Conference CFP for more details).

 

Appel à propositions pour panels préconstitués 

Vous trouverez ci-bas des propositions de panels pour la conférence annuelle de l’Association canadienne d’études cinématographiques (ACÉC), qui se tiendra du 12 au 15 mai 2022. Veuillez consulter les appels à propositions des panels préconstitués ci-dessous. Si vous souhaitez postuler pour l’un d’entre eux, envoyez le résumé et la biographie requis au(x) responsable(s) du panel en question d’ici le 15 janvier 2022.

 Chaque président·e de panel vous informera de sa décision d’ici le 25 janvier. Les propositions ainsi sélectionnées pour être incluses dans leur soumission finale et envoyées au Comité de la conférence le 31 janvier.

 Si votre proposition n’est pas sélectionnée pour le panel pour lequel vous avez postulé, nous vous invitons à la soumettre en tant que présentation individuelle pour la date limite du 31 janvier (voir l’appel général de la Conférence 2022 pour plus de détails).


Panel Call Table of Contents

  1. Reframing the Nation: Racialized/Queer Diasporic Independent Women Filmmakers in Canada
  2. Making Spaces for Repair, Making Room for Other Virtual Reality Futurities
  3. Antenational Cinemas: Rethinking Indigenous and Canadian Images
  4. Social Media as Cinemas of Attraction
  5. Utopies adolescentes à la télévision/TV Teen Utopias
  6. Passages, Transitions, and Transformations: Imagining Intersectional Feminist Media and Film Futures
  7. Living Archives and Counter-Archives in Film, Video, and Media Arts in Canada
  8. Experiments in Independent Film & Media in Canada

 

 

 


 

1. Reframing the Nation: Racialized/Queer Diasporic  Independent Women Filmmakers in Canada 

This panel is dedicated to a close engagement with films produced by racialized and  queer racialized independent women filmmakers in Canada. It aims to ignite conversations around the often underexamined cinematic visions, perspectives, and  legacies of especially first and second generation racialized/queer women filmmakers  engaged in independent filmmaking between 1980-2020 across Canada. The particular focus is on independent production across all moving image genres and formats,  encapsulating artistic practices rooted in personal, political, aesthetic, cultural,  philosophical, and/or social justice concerns. We hope to explore the fraught relationship  that can arise in independent production between arts funding and policy, and  artistic/creative agency especially for minoritized groups. Further, we are interested in  exploring how queer/queer diasporic women filmmakers contribute to and/or challenge  national and settler narratives through their creative practice.  

 

Submissions can explore the following: 

  • Theoretical explorations of diasporic works by Canadian racialized women or queer/trans  women of colour, Black and Indigenous women filmmakers from decolonial, post-colonial,  queer diasporic or transnational contexts; 
  • Historiographies of film/video by racialized women filmmakers and queer & trans of colour filmmakers in Canada; 
  • Intersectional critiques of settler nationhood, settler complicities, or homonationalism through the work of racialized women / queer women of colour filmmakers;
  • Relationships and tensions between cultural identities, diasporic aesthetics, and politics;
  • Afro-Indigenous and Asian-Indigenous theories, methodologies, histories, praxis;
  • Diasporic and transnational spatialities; home and belonging, displacement, migration;
  • Thematic, textual, or aesthetic analyses of documentary, narrative, experimental, activist,  and hybrid films (all genres and platforms considered) by queer and racialized women  filmmakers; 
  • Reception/audience studies of works by women of colour in Canada; *Arts and culture policy and their impacts on queer/women of colour production in Canada; *Festivals, distributors and other media organisations that support works by Indigenous  women & women of colour filmmakers in Canada; 
  • Critical and decolonial uses of technologies; 
  • Archival reanimations by queer/women of colour filmmakers and moving image artists;
  • Comparative analyses of Canadian productions and international or transnational productions. 

*We are especially seeking proposals on Black, Caribbean, South Asian and Arab  women filmmakers in Canada. 

Submissions from anyone working in these research  areas will be considered. Please submit an abstract (300 words) & short bio (125 words) by January 15, 2022 to  panel chairs: Dr. Michelle Mohabeer mmohabee@yorku.ca & Dr. May Chew may.chew@concordia.ca.  

**Submissions will also be considered for an upcoming edited anthology on the same theme.  

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2. Making Spaces for Repair, Making Room for Other Virtual Reality Futurities 

Starting from the premise that “empathy” has overdetermined and underserved scholarly and popular discourse about virtual reality (VR), this panel seeks  papers that expand our understanding of what  VR may actually be capable of: as an immersive audiovisual technology, as an artform, and as an aesthetic. To do so, we take as a point of departure the notion that VR, like all media, only works  as an “empathy machine” in limited and highly subjective ways. What other feelings, bodies, and futures might VR and media scholars make room for if we hold other doors open? 

 

Without turning a blind eye to the racist (Nakamura 2020), ableist (Redden 2018), and appropriative (Yang 2017) foundations of contemporary VR, this panel seeks contributions that will hold these conditions up to new scrutiny and with an eye towards repair. In an effort to rethink some of the central concepts of virtual reality (immersion, presence, interactivity, etc.), we propose to take space, the body, and their interminglings as central objects of study. How can we build spaces within VR that do not reproduce the colonial, racist, or otherwise toxic tendencies of our current world? What kinds of bodies can we make room for in the spaces VR has to offer? Ultimately, what gets made in the imbrication of body, space, and screen in VR experiences?

 

We encourage submissions that might address topics including, but not limited, to: 

  • Repairing VR’s affective address
  • Rethinking central concepts (immersion, presence, interactivity, etc.)
  • Decolonizing VR spaces 
  • New temporalities in VR/AR
  • Reparative approaches to VR theory
  • Indigenous futurities in VR
  • Afrofuturism and VR
  • VR and emerging affects, structures of feeling, or other sensorial capacities
  • VR and ecocriticism
  • Analyses of VR spaces of maintenance and repair
  • Spaces of/for immersive experience exhibition
  • Public/domestic contexts for experiencing VR
  • Metaverse as space for leisure (and labour)

 

Proposals should include your name, affiliation, and a short bio (50 words), along with a document listing a title, short abstract (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5). 

 

*Veuillez noter que nous acceptons aussi des propositions en français.


Please send your proposals to Aubrey Anable (AubreyAnable@cunet.carleton.ca) or Philippe Bédard (philippebedard@cunet.carleton.ca) by January 15th, 2022.

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3. “Antenational Cinemas: Rethinking Indigenous and Canadian Images” 

How do First Nations, Inuit, Métis, and Canadian cinemas represent, construct, maintain, and challenge  visions of national identity? While this question has been approached through a wide range of  methodologies, a definitive view of what constitutes a Canadian national cinema remains elusive. The  field continues to explore positions that stress fragments, differences, incongruities, and complexities  rather than a coherent historical lineage or homogenous perspective on identity. For Marchessault and  Straw (2019), “the idea that Canadian cinema might reveal or express an essential national identity has  receded from scholarly and critical writing, but the question of what ideas might occupy its place is far  from being resolved” (xxi). This panel seeks to address this opening in field by mapping some of the  critical and practical tendencies of Canadian cinemas in relation to the “antenational” – with “ante-”  stressing before the nation. While this concept may, for some, connote the idea of an anti-national  cinema, my conceptualization of “antenational” does not necessarily foreground as oppositional politics  to national identity, even if some Indigenous or Québec films explicitly embrace such a position in  relation to Canada’s colonial and political history. Instead, antenational cinemas accounts for a  continuum of cinematic pathways that may resist identifying as Canadian, may interrogate the tensions  between feminist and nationalist discourses, may advocate for a distinct nation within a nation, or may  seek acceptance within national discourses and communities. Furthermore, antenational cinema accounts  for BIPOC, Queer, transnational, and diasporic cinemas at a multiplicity of intersections between  Canada, outside, and elsewhere (to mobilize Galt and Schoonover’s framing of Queer Cinemas in the  World). Therefore, papers within this panel should approach and interrogate definitions of national  cinema and Canadian identity. 

Key words: Indigenous cinemas, Canadian cinemas, minoritarian, national cinema, antenational 

Possible topics include: 

  • Indigenous cinemas that mobilize pre-contact and other films as “before” the nation 
  • Women filmmakers who address the spaces between nationalism and feminism 
  • Diasporic and transnational cinemas that map histories “before” the nation 
  • Indigenous cinemas that challenge and interrogate discourses of the Canadian nation state 
  •  Québec cinemas that explore the idea of a nation within a nation 
  • Films from the Prairies or Atlantic that stress differences or similarities (national identity) 
  • Queer cinemas that foreground a “before” the nation that is political or fantastic 
  •  Black Canadian filmmakers who increase representation or confront racism in Canada 
  • BIPOC directors who expose the fallacies of multiculturalism 
  • Early feature films that map alternative potentialities within the history of Canadian cinemas 

 

Please send proposals to Terrance McDonald (terrance.mcdonald@utoronto.ca) by 15 January 2022. The proposals should contain: name, affiliation, a short bio (50 words), paper title, and a 250-350-word  abstract, keywords (3-5), and bibliographic references (3-5).

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4. Social Media as Cinemas of Attraction

We are living in a screen saturated culture which, within the demands of the ‘attention economy’ (Goldhaber 1997), continues to turn increasingly to the moving image to hold our gaze. It is hard in these times as film and media scholars not to think of the multiplicitous histories of cinema aesthetics that inform, knowingly or not, thevisual cultures that circulate and go viral across social media platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok. The integration into Instagram’s design over the last two years of ‘Stories’ and ‘Reels’ as a means of competing with TikTok’s default format of short video vignettes (which is itself a remake of Vine) has led to a developing interest among film and media scholars on how to account for the echoes, appropriations, and remixes of earlier visual histories (Avdeef 2021, Lever, Highfield, Abadin 2020). This panel invites papers that consider the cinematic elements of social media content. This could include anything from the narrative logic of memes to viral videos and trending dance challenges. What about the formation and circulation of these newer moving image practices index prior histories of film and media production? And perhaps most importantly, to what social, cultural, and political effect?

 

Keywords: social media, cinema, moving image, screen cultures, media histories, aesthetics

 

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Social media as a 21st century cinema of attractions
  • The avant-garde, experimental, amateur aesthetics of videos online
  • The intersection of fine art and popular culture on social media platforms
  • The use of cinema vocabularies and histories in social media practices
  • Memes as cinematic narrative vignettes
  • The reliance on films, characters, figures in pop culture remixing of digital culture
  • Activist uses of film and media historical practices now
  • The promise and limitations of visual representation in digital cultural spaces
  • The violence of using Black, Indigneous, racialized, and queer bodies as excess in meme and gif cultures
  • The racism, ableism, trans and homophobia of social media algorithms and their impact on digital visual cultural production.

 

Please send proposals to Shana MacDonald (shana.macdonald@uwaterloo.ca) by January 15th. Please include in your proposal your name, affiliation, and a short bio (50 words), along with a document listing a title, short abstract (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5).

 

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5. Utopies adolescentes à la télévision

L’adolescence est l’époque du « pas encore », typique des utopies et, en même temps, un moment ayant ses caractéristiques propres, très puissantes. Est-elle l’espace (télévisuel) pour repenser notre futur? Elle est un sujet de plus en plus présent dans les séries télé récentes : pensons à Euphoria, Genera+ion, Sex Education, Dear White People, We Are Who We Are, Never Have I Ever, SKAM, la permanence de la franchise Degrassi au Canada et, au Québec, Le Chalet, La vie compliquée de Léa Olivier, L’Académie... Le territoire est en pleine expansion, remodelant un genre bien connu au cinéma et à la télévision, entre nostalgie et utopie. Les séries arrivent à raconter la dimension microscopique du quotidien des ados tout en construisant une tension vers l’avenir — à la fois une manière de repousser la fin et d’y tendre — que la narration en épisodes réalise bien. De plus, l’expérience d’une série est parcourue par une puissante incertitude qui s’allie bien à l’état d’hésitation, désorientation et maladresse de l’adolescence. Pour ce qui concerne les questions représentées, la Génération Z est le lieu d’une attention plus forte envers la diversité, le féminisme, le changement climatique et devient un nouveau terrain pour un renouvellement des thématiques. S’agit-il simplement de stratégies de marché, ou d’un espace politique pour une façon de faire les choses différemment ? Qu’est-ce que le concept d’utopie queer peut mettre à jour dans le panorama contemporain des études télévisuelles et médiatiques ? 

Mots-clés : télévision, séries, adolescence, queer, utopie, publics, futur

Thèmes possibles: 

  • L’adolescence et le futur de la télévision; 
  • L’adolescent.e des séries comme sujet politique;
  • Les caractéristiques formelles des séries portant sur l’adolescence;
  • Les séries adolescentes comme exemple de « télévision queer »;
  • Les publics des séries qui représentent des ados;
  • Le lien avec les réseaux sociaux, dans la série et dans son dispositif transmédiatique;

 

Des contributions portant sur ces questions (ou d’autres!) à partir de la perspective de l’esthétique télévisuelle, des études culturelles, queer, ou de production, y compris avec une approche transnationale, sont les bienvenues. 

Contact: marta.boni@umontreal.ca 

 

TV Teen Utopias

Adolescence is the age of the “not there yet”, typical of utopias, and, at the same time, it is a time with its specificities. Is it the (televisual) space for rethinking our future? Teenagers are more and more present in recent TV series: think of Euphoria, Genera + ion, Sex Education, Dear White People, We Are Who We Are, Never Have I Ever, SKAM, the permanence of the Degrassi franchise in Canada and, in Quebec, Le Chalet, La vie compliquée de Léa Olivier, The Academy … The territory is in full expansion, reshaping a genre well known in cinema and television, between nostalgia and utopia. TV series manage to display the microscopic dimension of the daily life of teenagers while building a tension towards the future – both a way of postponing the end and reaching for it – that serial storytelling achieves well. In addition, the experience of a series is riddled with a powerful uncertainty that combines well with the hesitation, disorientation and awkwardness, also typical of adolescence. Regarding the issues represented, Generation Z is the place of greater attention to diversity, feminism, climate change and becomes a new ground for a renewal of themes. Are these just market strategies, or is it the political space for a way to do things differently? What can the concept of queer utopia bring to light in the contemporary television and media studies panorama?

 

Keywords: television, series, adolescence, queer, utopia, audiences, future

Possible themes:

  • Adolescence and the future of television;
  • The adolescent series as a political subject;
  • The formal characteristics of the series dealing with adolescence;
  • Teenage series as an example of “queer television”;
  • Audiences of series that represent teenagers;
  • The link with social networks, in the series and in its transmedia system;

 

Contributions addressing these issues (or others!) From the perspective of television aesthetics, cultural, queer, or production studies, including a transnational approach, are welcome.

Please send proposals to Marta Boni (marta.boni@umontreal.ca) by January 15th. Please include in your proposal your name, affiliation, and a short bio (50 words), along with a document listing a title, short abstract (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5).

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6. Passages, Transitions, and Transformations: Imagining Intersectional Feminist Media and Film Futures 

Feminist film and media studies have made important interventions into heteronormative histories by indexing the space(s), place(s), and labour of women and nonbinary people within film and media in ways that interrogate the seemingly objective neutrality of their canons. At the same time, some of the most popular forms of feminism, in both the past and present, have focused on a white feminine figure that obscures other social inequities (Banet Weiser 2018; Daniels 2016) and does not challenge existing social relations (Gill 2017). Popular signifers of white feminism overlook the significant and long-standing contributions of Black, Indigenous, and racialized feminist and queer activists that have radically disrupted dominant forms of representation and cultural work. Notably, these kinds of (in)visibility within and across  the screens of social media platforms, media, and films are at the fore of contemporary feminsit media scholarship. Reflecting on these histories and on-going tensions, this panel invites submissions that broadly seek to identify, explore, interrogate, and/or imagine intersectional feminist (Collins 1990, 2017,  2019; Crenshaw 1989, 1991) film and media scholarship, methods, practices, and tools from both the past and present that may be adapted and extended upon as we look to develop more equitable and sustainable futures in our scholarly, activist, and creative practices.  

Keywords: Intersectional feminism; feminist media studies; feminist film studies; digital  activism; methodology; practice  

Possible topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Creative explorations and analyses on the continuities, contradictions, and comparisons  between (the passing of) time, space, and place and their impacts on feminist activist media and film;  
  • Queer and feminist media and film and postcolonial, Indigenous, and Afrofuturist theories, methodologies, case studies, praxes, and applications;  
  • Critical analyses of the feminist, queer, racialized, and decolonial politics and uses of  technologies;  
  • Archival, aesthetic, thematic, creative, and critical analyses of feminist, queer,  postcolonial, and anti-racist film and media;  
  • Analyses, case studies, and theorizations of how feminists create, use, and circulate digital artifacts that contribute to the formation of their own communities and digital assemblies; 
  • Articulations and analyses of feminist, queer, decolonial, postcolonial, and anti-racist digital stories and artifacts and the circulation of these stories and artifacts among a  variety of digital platforms, media, and spheres of power;  
  • Explorations of feminist, queer, postcolonial, decolonial, and anti-racist media protest  and resistance and the ways that they foster collective action and coalitional affinities.  

Please send proposals to Brianna Wiens (biwiens@uwaterloo.ca) by January 15th. In your  proposal, please include your name, a short bio (50 words), submission title, a short abstract  (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5).

 

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7. Living Archives and Counter-Archives in Film, Video, and Media Arts in Canada 

Archives are generally associated with things that are dead and static but digital media are impacting the very meaning and location of archives along with the production of more dynamic and diverse histories. Since the archival turn in the early 1990s (generally attributed to the rise of the internet and the expansion of local area networks globally), artists and digital humanists, often working in collaboration with archivists, have been at the forefront of developing new ways to animate and create archives both public and private. Artists are using film and media archives to disrupt traditional forms of history, collection, and national narrative. New approaches to celluloid, video, and digital media are process oriented, participatory, and performative. Archives used in this way foster new living ecologies of entanglement that are generating more complex epistemological models of memory and place.

Archive/Counter-Archive: Activating Canada’s Audiovisual Heritage is a SSHRC Partnership Grant research-creation project dedicated to activating and remediating audiovisual archives created by Indigenous Peoples (First Nations, Métis, Inuit), the Black community and People of Colour, women, LGBT2Q+ and immigrant communities. Political, resistant, and community-based, counter-archives disrupt conventional narratives and enrich our histories. For the purposes of this project, we have defined counter-archives as political, ingenious, resistant, and community-based. They are embodied differently and have explicit intention to historicize differently, to disrupt conventional national narratives, and to write difference into public accounts. They seek to counter the hegemony of traditional archival institutions that have normally neglected or marginalized women, Indigenous, Inuit and Métis Peoples, the LGBT2Q+ community, and immigrant communities. This panel invites presentations on research and research-creation related to the themes and approaches of Archive/Counter-Archive.

Keywords: archives and counter-archives; archival film, video, and media; community media; media by women, Indigenous, Inuit and Métis Peoples, the LGBT2Q+ community, and immigrant communities.

Please send proposals to Antoine Damiens (kmo@counterarchive.ca) by January 15th. In your  proposal, please include your name, a short bio (50 words), submission title, a short abstract  (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5).

 

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8. Experiments in Independent Film & Media in Canada

Abstract: The current vibrancy of the independent film and media arts sector in Canada and globally is evident. This panel seeks presentations on experimental and independent film, video, and media production, distribution, and exhibition in Canada. Experimental film, video art, and digital media enjoy a rich tradition of scholarship and criticism. This panel also seeks papers on films and media at the margins of these forms: how has experimentation taken place in independent narrative, documentary, industrial, and community media? Co-ops and other artist-run centres operate at the grassroots level to provide access to film and media production, distribution, and exhibition for local communities, including minoritized groups who started separate organizations when excluded from government, industry, and existing independent film and media sectors. Less subject to commercial pressures, the independent sector facilitated a greater degree of formal and cultural innovation and experimentation, enabling new ways of working, including forms of non-hierarchal organization. The independent sector sought to leverage collective power to access resources, and also may teach us about how discourses of gender, sexuality, race, Indigeneity, and ability operate in relation to larger institutions in government (including arts councils), industry, academia, the art world, and archives. How have production histories, distribution ventures, and exhibition sites performed experimental gestures against social and aesthetic convention? The panel is also open to considerations of alternative forms of criticism, innovative archival histories, and contemporary gallery and museum installations and performance. We invite panelists to incorporate an anti-racist approach and an equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) lens to expand Canadian film and media arts history to make it more inclusive of the diversity of – and within – the grassroots cultural communities that engaged in independent experimentation across multiple media forms.

 

Keywords: experimental film & media; independent film & media; BIPOC voices in film & media history in Canada; community media; film & media cooperatives

Please send proposals to Michael Zryd (zryd@yorku.ca) by January 15th. In your  proposal, please include your name, a short bio (50 words), submission title, a short abstract  (250-350 words), keywords (3-5) and bibliographic references (2-5).

 

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Call for Papers: A Teaching Companion to Silent Cinema
Edited by Liz Clarke and Martin Johnson

Due by Dec. 15, 2021

Film studies programs big and small have a common course: film history. While programs divide film history courses in different ways—some by time period, others by geography—they all address, if only for a few weeks, silent cinema. These courses are rarely taught by researchers of silent film, and a reliance on textbooks and allusions to the best known silent films mischaracterize the period. In A Teaching Companion to Silent Cinema, we hope to challenge these narratives of the first decades of cinema through rich, engaging short essays on films that expand our sense of the very possibilities of the medium. This collection will take what silent film researchers already know–that the period from film’s invention in the late 19th century to the transition to sound in the 1930s is among the diverse, dynamic, and complex–and make films that more fully represent this period accessible to teachers and students of film history.

Canonical histories of silent cinema have, with few exceptions, focused on films made by white men in the United States and Europe. Filmmakers such as D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, and Sergei Eisenstein are lionized, while women, people of color, and filmmakers from small nations are ignored. Historical epics and slapstick comedies are celebrated, while a multitude of other genres and modes of filmmaking are skipped entirely. Although scholars, archivists, and critics are actively seeking to correct these oversights in their research, writing, and programming, the most widely used textbooks in the field continue to emphasize this older narrative. When students and teachers seek out diverse films, they often have trouble finding material to contextualize what they’re seeing, particularly short essays focused on individual films.

With this call, we are seeking essays (3,500 to 5,000 words) on feature films, and notes (1,000 to 1,500 words) on short films that represent the diversity of silent film cultures. These scholarly essays will provide context to the film, information about the filmmakers, background information, and a concise analysis of the film. These texts can be used to complement commonly used film history textbooks or in conjunction with theoretical essays. A few guidelines:

  • One proposal per submitter. We want this collection to reflect the diversity of scholarship in the field as well.
  • Proposed films should be readily available to instructors, through DVD, BluRay, digital repositories, or other sources.
  • Ideally, your proposal should discuss a film that you have successfully screened to undergraduates. We are seeking to introduce students to films that will excite and engage them.
  • We are seeking essays that challenge our sense of the film canon, while remaining accessible. While we welcome all proposals, here is a non-exhaustive list of some of the films we would like to include:
    • Mario Roncoroni, Filibus (1915), Italy
    • Enrique Rosas, The Grey Automobile (1919), Mexico
    • Francis Ford, The Craving (1918), USA
    • Frances Marion, The Love Light (1922), USA
    • Oscar Micheaux, The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920), USA Jean Epstein, Coueur Fidèle (1923), France
    • Robert Wiene, The Hands of Orlac (1924), Austria
    • Lotte Reiniger, The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), Germany Dorothy Davenport, Linda (1929), USA
    • Teinosuke Kinugasa, A Page of Madness (1926), Japan
    • Wu Yonggang, The Goddess (1934), China
    • Mário Peixoto, Limite (1930), Brazil
    • Norbert A. Myles, The Daughter of Dawn (1920), USA Holger-Madsen, Trip to Mars (1918), Denmark
    • Marion E. Wong’s The Curse of Quon Gwon (c. 1916-17), USA Cleo Madison, Eleanor’s Catch (1916), USA
    • Yevgeni Bauer, The Dying Swan (1917), Russia
    • E.A. Dupont, Piccadilly (1929), UK

 

Please send 300-word proposals, a 50-word bio, and access information for the feature-length or short film you would like to discuss to mlj@email.unc.edu and lclarke@brocku.ca by December 15, 2021. Acceptances will be sent by January 17, 2022, and essays will be due by May 30, 2022.

proposals, a 50-word bio, and access information for the feature-length or

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Front End Developer & Analyst

Starting September 2022 (renewable up to 5 years)

Open to students in any graduate program in Canada and the United States

More info: https://carleton.ca/transmedialab/2021/developer-analyst-fall2022/


Join the Transgender Media Lab and Humanities Data Lab!

We are seeking an incoming or existing MA or PhD student to lead front end development and analysis for the Transgender Media Portal. 

Trans, Two Spirit, queer, Black, and Indigenous candidates and candidates of colour are especially encouraged to apply!

The Transgender Media Lab at Carleton University and the Humanities Data Lab at the University of Ottawa are building the Transgender Media Portal (TMP), a website that will act as a kind of IMDb for trans, nonbinary, Two-Spirit, and gender-nonconforming filmmakers and their films. The portal will: a) enable new ways of analyzing trans film production, distribution, and reception; b) share information about trans-made films with educators, students, festival programmers, artists, activists, and the public; and c) model best practices in terms of academic/community digital partnerships and digital sustainability. The TMP uses minimal computing principles to ensure maximum longevity and sustainability of the site and its data. Our workflow involves converting data from CSV to HTML, with a JSON-backed static search, and CSS and JavaScript front end.

Responsibilities for this position include:

  • Creating the CSS and JavaScript for the TMP static site
  • Maintaining the website
  • Producing documentation and how-tos
  • Determining how to improve the site based on feedback from users and implementing these improvements
  • Conducting data analysis and data visualizations (e.g. maps, timelines, animations, network graphs) to answer the project’s research questions

Previous experience required in the following areas:

  • CSS
  • JavaScript
  • Website stewardship, including producing documentation
  • Analytic visualization

Preferred skills and background:

  • Work with trans communities
  • Experience with community-based projects
  • Experience with collaborative team projects
  • Galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM) sector experience
  • Metadata
  • Library data standards
  • Scripting, Python or XSLT

Compensation and duration:

  • The position is guaranteed for two years and renewable for up to five years.
  • This position is for 200 hours of research assistance work per academic year (~C$9,000/year). It will be compensated at the CUPE 2626 graduate Teaching Assistantship rates (currently C$46.86/hr, with an annual inflation of 1%).
  • If the candidate is enrolled in a university program, the position includes a Transgender Media Lab Scholarship of C$1,500/year.
  • Funding for travel for research and conferences will also be provided.

Incoming University of Ottawa and Carleton University students:

Interested incoming candidates should apply to a related MA, PhD or terminal degree program of their choice at the University of Ottawa (CommunicationComputer ScienceDigital Transformation and InnovationFeminist & Gender StudiesInformation Studies) or Carleton University (Communication and Media StudiesComputer ScienceCultural MediationsFilm StudiesHuman-Computer InteractionInformation TechnologyWomen’s and Gender Studies). Candidates may apply for more than one program but will have to pick one if admitted to more than one. We encourage candidates to apply for additional awards and financial support (uOttawaCarleton).

Enrolled students and students at other universities: 

Students who will be enrolled in any graduate program in Canada and the United States in Fall 2022 are eligible to apply. Students not based in Ottawa can work remotely.

The Transgender Media Lab is committed to principles of equality and social justice. We especially encourage trans, Two Spirit, queer, Black, and Indigenous candidates and candidates of colour to apply. Fellows will be expected to agree to a statement of values and abide by a code of conduct to ensure a safe, supportive working environment for all lab members and guests.

To apply:

  • Email the project director, Laura Horak (laura.horak@carleton.ca), to indicate your interest in the position.
  • For students who are applying to graduate programs at the University of Ottawa or Carleton:
    • Follow the online instructions to apply for the program(s) of your choice. In the “Statement of Intent” in your application:
      • Indicate your interest in this position and include the following sentence: “I give permission for the graduate admissions committee to share my application materials and letters of reference with Dr. Laura Horak and Dr. Constance Crompton”;
      • Describe all relevant skills and experience you have;
      • Trans, Two Spirit, queer, Black, and Indigenous candidates and candidates of colour are invited to self-identify.
  • For students who are already enrolled or students at other universities:
    • A cover letter that describes why you are interested in this position and your relevant skills, background, and experience. Trans, Two Spirit, queer, Black, and Indigenous candidates and candidates of colour are invited to self-identify.
    • A CV
    • An unofficial transcript from your most recent academic experience

 

Deadline:

  • Incoming University of Ottawa and Carleton students: Your graduate program’s application deadline. 
  • Enrolled students and students at other universities in Canada and the United States: February 1, 2022

Do you have questions? Feel free to reach out to project director Laura Horak at laura.horak@carleton.ca. For questions about the specific graduate programs, contact the graduate supervisor for that program.

This position is funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Transgender Media Portal: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

 

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Encyclopedia of Animation Studies: 

Techniques, Processes, Environments (Bloomsbury, 2024)

We invite chapter proposals for the second of four volumes of the Encyclopedia of Animation Studies: Techniques, Processes, Environments (Bloomsbury, 2024). The expansive four-volume series will showcase established and emerging scholarship on animation, including transdisciplinary approaches that consider the proliferating forms and roles of animation today. This second volume, edited by Dr. Franziska Bruckner and Dr. Alla Gadassik, focuses specifically on animation techniques, processes, and environments – howwhere, and why animation is made and exhibited. 

This volume is committed to connecting insights of scholars and creative practitioners, including those working at intersections of theory and praxis, as well intersections of animation and other disciplines. The first quarter of the volume is dedicated to shorter essays (2,000 words) by animation practitioners, while the remaining sections, which are open to all contributors, will follow more conventional academic chapter lengths (7,000 words). The editors look forward to supporting authors with a range of experience and comfort level with academic publication. Contributing artists and scholars without full-time institutional affiliation will be offered a modest honorarium by the volume editors.

Chapter proposals should clearly align with one of the following four areas:

Techniques (shorter essays): reflections on specific animation techniques by creative practitioners who can contextualize those techniques in relationship to their own and other artists’ practices. Chapters that closely attend to more specific approaches than broad categories like ‘analog’ or ‘digital’ (for example, vector-based animation; pixel-based animation; procedural animation, etc.) are especially welcome.

Processes: essays that explore the nuances of animation production in particular contexts, which might include attention to animation labour; specific roles and stages of development in industrial and commercial animation; and/or considerations in different experimental processes.

Environments: essays that explore animation’s relationship to particular sites of exhibition and display; locate animation in specific intermedia environments; and/or consider the distinct forms animation can take depending on its site.

Forms: essays that provide deeper insight into the relationship between animation and its allied forms (for example, comics or kinetic sculptures), and/or explore a particular form of animation (for example, advertising or pornography) by attending to common themes, temporal structures, or modes of address.

Proposals should include a chapter title, an abstract (300 words), and a short author bio (50 words). Inquiries and questions in advance of proposal submission are welcome. Proposals should be submitted to one of the editors, Dr. Alla Gadassik (gadassik@ecuad.ca) or Dr. Franziska Bruckner (franziska.bruckner@fhstp.ac.at) by Friday, January 28, 2022. All received proposals will receive responses by March 1, 2022. First drafts of chapters will be due by August 2023 for scheduled publication in 2024.