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Call for Papers – Version Française ci-dessous

PROPAGANDA-CENSORSHIP-DIGITAL MEDIA

FILM STUDIES ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
17th ANNUAL GRADUATE COLLOQUIUM

FEBRUARY 27-28, 2015

UNIVERSITY OF REGINA

Keynote Lecture by Dr. Will Straw, Director, McGill Institute for the Study of Canada, McGill University

Submission deadline: Monday, December 15th 2014*

Propaganda is pervasive in contemporary society, and has generated a considerable body of artefacts and theories which attempt to explain them. In fact, it is thanks to its role as propaganda during WWI that cinema became a legitimate art. By the end of the 1930s, its mobilizational potential was taken seriously by all countries with established film industries, and continued to be valued during the Cold War, thus generating speculations that cinema has an inherent structural and technological predisposition for distortion – both of optics and of meaning (Paul Virilio). Nowadays, because of ubiquitous screen media outlets, we have witnessed an unprecedented proliferation of conspiracy theories as an alternative form of (dis) information or propaganda. Moreover, since its emergence as a mass media phenomenon, film propaganda has always already been associated with (self) censorship and surveillance. Therefore, at the 2015 FSAC Grad Colloquium, we invite discussion of the complex – even paradoxical – relationship between film/media arts (and film language), on the one hand, and propaganda, surveillance, (self) censorship and conspiracy theories, on the other – from both contemporary and historical points of view.

Papers and possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Historical role of film propaganda, surveillance and (self) censorship
- Theoretical approaches to film propaganda
- Conspiracy cinema
- Conspiracy theories on film and in social media
- Censorship and self-censorship in cinema and in social media
- Censorship, self-censorship and the evolution of film language
- Surveillance on film
- Surveillance and (self) censorship
- Contemporary cinematic forms of propaganda and consensus building
- The filmmaker as propagandist
- Digital technology and propaganda
- Cinematography, film sound and editing in service of propaganda
- Propaganda in narrative cinema or avant-garde film or computer games

*Submissions are invited from all English and French speaking graduate students (MA & PhD), in Film and Media Studies or a related discipline. PLEASE NOTE THAT PROPOSALS ON TOPICS other than the colloquium’s official theme ARE ALSO WELCOME. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words. Be sure to include your name, degree, academic affiliation, e-mail address, as well as the title of your presentation. Abstracts should be sent to: Philippe.Mather@uregina.ca. Please write “Grad Colloquium 2015” in the subject heading of the e-mail, and upload the abstract as an attachment (in either Word or PDF format). Notices of acceptance will be sent by January 2015.

Click here to download the Call for Papers 

PROPAGANDE – CENSURE - MÉDIAS NUMÉRIQUES

ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE D’ÉTUDES CINÉMATOGRAPHIQUES
17e COLLOQUE ANNUEL DES ÉTUDIANTS DE 2e ET 3e CYCLES
27-28 FÉVRIER 2015

UNIVERSITÉ DE RÉGINA

Discours d’ouverture prononcé par le Dr. Will Straw, Directeur de l’Institut d’études canadiennes de McGill, Université McGill.

Date limite de soumission: lundi, le 15 décembre 2014*

La propagande est largement répandue dans la société contemporaine, ayant produit un large corpus d’artefacts et de théories qui tentent de les comprendre. En fait, c’est grâce à son rôle de propagande pendant la première guerre mondiale que le cinéma est devenu un art légitime. Dès la fin des années trente, son pouvoir de mobilisation fut prise au sérieux par toutes les nations dotées d’une industrie cinématographique, et continua d’être appréciée pendant la guerre froide. Certains en conclurent que le cinéma est caractérisé par une prédisposition structurelle et technologique à la distortion optique et sémantique (Paul Virilio). De nos jours, à cause de l’omniprésence des écrans médiatiques, on peut observer une prolifération sans précédent de théories conspirationnistes qui servent d’”information” ou de propagande. De plus, depuis son apparition au sein des mass média, la propagande cinématographique a toujours déjà été associée avec la censure et la surveillance. Ainsi, au colloque 2015 de l’ACEC pour les étudiants de 2e et de 3e cycles, nous invitons les participants à débattre d’une question complexe, voire paradoxale, soient les rapports entre les arts filmiques (leurs langages respectifs) d’une part, et la propagande, la surveillance, la censure et l’auto-censure, et les theories du complot d’autre part, de points de vue contemporains et historiques à la fois.

Les présentations et sujets potentiels peuvent inclure, sans s’y limiter:
-Le rôle historique du film de propagande, de la surveillance et de la censure
-Les approches théoriques du film de propagande
-Le cinéma conspirationniste
-Les théories du complot concernant le cinéma et les médias sociaux
-La censure, l’auto-censure et l’évolution du langage cinématographique
-La surveillance au cinéma
-La surveillance et l’auto-censure
-La propagande cinématographique contemporaine comme recherche d’un consensus
-Le cinéaste comme propagandiste
-La technologie numérique et la propagande
-La caméra, le son, et le montage au service de la propagande
-La propagande dans le cinéma narratif ou d’avant-garde, ou dans les jeux vidéos

*Tous les étudiants de 2e et 3e cycles en études de cinéma ou toute discipline connexe, pouvant s’exprimer en anglais ou en français, peuvent soumettre une présentation. PRIÈRE DE NOTER que les propositions ne correspondant pas à la thématique du colloque SONT ÉGALEMENT ACCEPTABLES. Veuillez faire parvenir un résumé de votre présentation (maximum : 250 mots). Assurez-vous d’inclure votre nom, diplôme, affiliation académique, courriel, ainsi que le titre de votre présentation. Les résumés doivent être envoyés à : Philippe.Mather@uregina.ca. Veuillez indiquer « Colloque 2015 – 2e et 3e cycles » dans la section « Objet » du courriel et inclure le résumé de la présentation en pièce jointe (format Word ou PDF). Un avis d’acceptation sera envoyé en janvier 2015.

 

Peter Morris Prize

The Film Studies Association of Canada/ Association canadienne d’études cinématographiques and the Canadian Journal of Film Studies/Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques (CJFS/RCÉC) are pleased to announce the inauguration of the biennial Peter Morris Prize for the best essay published in the journal. Click here for more information…

 

Carleton University
School for Studies in Art and Culture
Assistant Professor, Film Studies (Tenure-Track)
(Closing Date: October 6 or until the position is filled)

Carleton University Film Studies, located in the School for Studies in Art and Culture, invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning July 1, 2015.

Applicants must have solid scholarly expertise in digital cinema and media. In addition, practical experience in digital film and media would be a strong asset. The successful candidate will be expected to teach a range of undergraduate and M.A. courses, as well as to supervise graduate students. Applicants must have a Ph.D., a strong commitment to scholarship as reflected in publications, an active research profile and demonstrated excellence in teaching.

Please submit your complete application electronically in four (4) separate files including: 1) a cover letter; 2) curriculum vitae; 3) sample publications; and 4) a teaching dossier.  In addition, applicants should arrange for three (3) letters of reference to be sent separately.

Your application should be sent electronically to:

Dr. William Echard
Acting Director, School for Studies in Art and Culture
Carleton University
Attention: laurie.jaeger@carleton.ca

Applications will be considered starting October 6 until the position is filled.

Located in Ottawa, Ontario, Carleton University is a dynamic and innovative research and teaching institution committed to developing solutions to real world problems by pushing the boundaries of knowledge and understanding daily.  Its internationally recognized faculty, staff, researchers, and librarians provide more than 27,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 65 programs of study. Carleton’s creative, interdisciplinary, and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative work in science and technology, business, governance, public policy, and the arts.

Minutes from downtown, Carleton University is located on a beautiful campus, bordered by the Rideau River and the Rideau Canal. With over 12 national museums and the spectacular Gatineau Park close by, there are many excellent recreational opportunities for individuals and families to enjoy. The City of Ottawa, with a population of almost one million, is Canada’s capital city and reflects the country’s bilingual and multicultural character. Carleton’s location in the nation’s capital provides many opportunities for research with groups and institutions that reflect the diversity of the country.

Carleton University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within its community as a source of excellence, cultural enrichment, and social strength. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our University including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity.  Those applicants that are selected for an interview will be requested to contact the Chair of the Search Committee as soon as possible to discuss any accommodation requirements. Arrangements will be made to accommodate requests in a timely manner.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.  All positions are subject to budgetary approval.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Imagining Crisis
York University Cinema & Media Studies Graduate Student Conference 2014
Toronto, Canada
November 21-23, 2014

 

Midway into the second decade of the 21st century, the term crisis has emerged as a dominant signifier, descriptor, and instrument of provocation and analysis. Crisis marks both a separation and a turning point, a break and a place of decision. In this light, crisis can be a critical tool, a means through which to imagine change, a site in which to work at questioning established limits (social, political, epistemological, ontological). As spaces of potential intervention in the given state of affairs, crises emerge from within and against a great variety of transitional moments, marking them as endpoints and/or origins.

Crisis can also be seen as the raison d’être of contemporary systems of control under neoliberal “24/7” capitalism. Indeed, in a world of “posts” (post: 911, “Axis of Evil”, economic collapse, Egyptian Revolution, Snowden, etc.), where economic, governmental, and mediatic forces of continuity now arguably absorb and integrate rupture and exception into their norms, have we reached a kind of crisis point of the very notion of crisis? Are we “post-crisis”? “Imagining Crisis” takes as its starting point the question of the crisis of crisis, and how to imagine  crisis — to take on a crisis of the imagination — in way specific to our contemporary moment.

What kinds of questions and contingent answers does crisis — or the crises specific to our time, to our academic, activist, and artistic practices — provoke? Conversely, how can we question the very notion of crisis, or use crisis to imagine and bring into being new forces? How does crisis make things politically and socially visible; and how does crisis as a critical term reveal itself?

Crisis can offer cinema and media studies scholars, filmmakers, media artists, and activists of many stripes an experimental and diagnostic space for critique and research. For example: is film studies reaching a crisis point in terms of its role in academia or in relation to significant changes in its purported object of study (celluloid film and/or digital video)? For media artists, are the institutions of the art gallery or the film festival at a point of transformation or obsolescence? Do social media sites like Facebook and Twitter present necessary challenges  to or opportunities for political and social activism? The multiplicity of ways in which crises present themselves as spurs and challenges to imagination and image technologies, as well as how crisis itself needs to be interrogated as a useful (or not) analytical term, is what “Imagining Crisis” seeks to begin to map out.

Topics for discussion and papers may include but are not limited to: 

- film as a (cultural) object in a state of transformation, decay, and/or mutation;

- academic and disciplinary transformations and the challenges they pose to critical thought, practice and pedagogy;

- representations of ecological and environmental development and disaster in film and media;

- changes in social (sexual, moral, etc.) conventions as represented in film and television programs;

- the roles of attention, participation and/or boredom in the contemporary mediascape;

- the representation and/or the critical analysis of precarious labour and identities (immaterial and manual labour, union busting, small studios, etc.);

- changes in media platforms and social networks and how they have affected the practice of film criticism, history, and/or analysis;

- navigating the blurring of boundaries between privacy and publicity;

- temporality and historical change as located in/through media objects and discourses;

- the human, the animal, the posthuman, and the cyborg as (post)historical subjects.

 

We welcome papers that engage with the work of contemporary scholars and theorists like, but not limited to, McKenzie Wark, Rosi Braidotti, Alexander Galloway, Eugene Thacker, Wendy Chun, and Benjamin Noys. We also welcome filmmakers, media practitioners, and activists to present and discuss their work. 

The confirmed Keynote Speaker for “Imagining Crisis” is McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker ManifestoGamer Theory50 Years of Recuperation of the Situationist InternationalThe Beach Beneath the Street, and The Spectacle of Disintegration, among others. He is a Professor at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College in New York City.

 

Please send a 300 word abstract, brief bibliography, and bio (with institutional affiliation, if applicable) as email attachments by September 28, 2014 to imaginingcrisis@gmail.com 

Notifications about acceptance or rejection of proposal will be sent by October 1, 2014.

 

“Imagining Crisis” will be held at York University, Toronto, Canada from November 21-23, 2014. 

The conference is cosponsored by Sensorium: Centre for Digital Arts & Technology, York University.

 

Tenure-track Position – Film Studies, University of Calgary

The Department of Communication and Culture invites applications for a tenure- track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective July 1, 2015. The area of specialization is Film Studies.

The Film Studies Program has a rapidly growing undergraduate major in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Calgary. Applicants are expected to teach undergraduate courses in the Film Studies program’s core areas as well in as their area of expertise, and teach and supervise students in the Communication and Culture graduate program in areas related to both Communications Studies and Film Studies. The incumbent will be expected to maintain an active research program, leading to peer-reviewed scholarly publications and research grant funding, while engaging in university service and with the community.

The successful candidate will possess a PhD in Film Studies or related field and demonstrate a strong record of or potential for scholarly research and teaching excellence at the post-secondary level. Expertise in one or more of the following areas will be an asset: international screen cultures; documentary film; technology and/or animation; media industries.

Applications in PDF format should include an application letter with a clear statement of citizenship/immigration status; a detailed curriculum vitae; a statement of research interests and expertise; a teaching dossier with sample course outlines, a concise statement of teaching philosophy and evidence of teaching excellence; one to two samples of peer-reviewed scholarly work (not more than 30pp total); and three academic letters of reference sent directly to the department by the deadline below. To facilitate the review process, applicants are encouraged to limit their dossier to these materials..

To ensure full consideration, complete applications (including all reference letters) must be submitted by November 15, 2014, to: 

Dr. Barbara Schneider, Department Head
Department of Communication and Culture
Faculty of Arts
University of Calgary
Room 320 Social Sciences Bldg.
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
E-mail:  krystle.monahan@ucalgary.ca

 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. The University of Calgary respects, appreciates, and encourages diversity.

Electronic submissions in PDF format for both the application and the letters of reference are encouraged. To learn more about the Department of Communication and Culture and this position please visithttp: www.comcul.ucalgary.ca

Additional Information
About the University of Calgary
The University of Calgary is a leading Canadian university located in the nation’s most enterprising city. The university has a clear strategic direction to become one of Canada’s top five research universities by 2016, where innovative teaching and groundbreaking research go hand in hand, and where we fully engage the communities we both serve and lead. The strategy is called Eyes High, inspired by our Gaelic motto, which translates to ‘I will lift up my eyes’.

To succeed as one of Canada’s top universities, where new ideas are created, tested and applied through first-class teaching and research, the University of Calgary needs more of the best minds in our classrooms and labs. We’re increasing our scholarly capacity by investing in people who want to change the world, bringing the best and brightest to Calgary to form a global intellectual hub and achieve advances that matter to everyone. 

About Calgary
Named a cultural capital of Canada and one of the best places to live in the world, Calgary is a city of leaders in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from the strongest economy in the nation and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 

Assistant Professor

Faculty of Arts – Department of English & Film Studies, New Media Studies

Competition No. – A110424038
Closing Date – Oct 31, 2014

 

The Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of New Media Studies.

Applicants should hold a PhD or be close to completion and will have a superior teaching and research/publication record relevant to the field. They will propose an innovative programme of research and outline how it complements existing areas of scholarly and pedagogical strength by helping to forge new links between the English-, film-, and cultural-studies streams of our large, diverse department. We seek applications from persons qualified to undertake teaching and research in one or more of the following areas: digital and online culture, adaptation theory, transmedia studies and remediation, convergence culture and new media industries. Responsibilities will include undergraduate and graduate teaching/supervision, as well as administrative/committee work.

The University of Alberta aims to be one of the world’s great universities, by transforming learning, leading ground-breaking research, and uplifting society through new knowledge, leadership, and service. The University plays a key role in the cultural, educational, and business life of the province of Alberta and Canada as a whole, through the impact of its integrated mandate of teaching, research, and community service. It serves over 39,000 students in close to 400 undergraduate, graduate and professional programs (www.ualberta.ca). The Faculty of Arts is the oldest faculty on campus and one of the largest research and teaching centres in western Canada (www.arts.ualberta.ca).  The University’s main campus is located in Edmonton, the vibrant, cosmopolitan capital of the province of Alberta.  The Edmonton metropolitan area is the sixth largest in the country with a population of approximately one million (www.edmonton.ca) and an outstanding quality of life.  It is located only a few hours’ drive from Banff and Jasper National Parks, which offer skiing in winter and excellent hiking and sightseeing in summer.

To apply online, please submit a cover letter (include the names of three referees), a curriculum vitae, a teaching dossier, if available (please attach under the statement of teaching/research interests option), and a writing sample to a maximum of 20 pages (please attach  under the list of publications option). Further, applicants are expected to contact their referees and arrange to have them send their letters of reference to the attention of the Chair, Dr. Peter Sinnema; these letters can be submitted via email to the Executive Assistant, Roberta Zopf at zopf@ualberta.ca

For further information concerning the position or the Department, please contact the Chair, Dr. Peter W. Sinnema, at peter.sinnema@ualberta.ca.

 

How to Apply:

Apply Online 

Note: Online applications are accepted until midnight Mountain Standard Time of the closing date.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. If suitable Canadian citizens or permanent residents cannot be found, other individuals will be considered.

The University of Alberta hires on the basis of merit. We are committed to the principle of equity in employment. We welcome diversity and encourage applications from all qualified women and men, including persons with disabilities, members of visible minorities, and Aboriginal persons.

http://careers.ualberta.ca/Competition/A110424038/

 

In Memoriam

Peter Harcourt (1931-2014)

 

Peter Harcourt, An Introduction

Seth Feldman

 

When Joyce Nelson and I edited our anthology Canadian Film Reader in 1977 we decided to end the book with a chapter entitled, “Introduction.”  It was too cute a ploy, something I wouldn’t do today.  On the other hand I’ve never regretted our choice of author for that piece: Peter Harcourt.

Peter was the Introduction to Canadian Film.  He began by introducing it to himself, coming around the long way as so many people did back then.  As a University of Toronto undergrad he studied music and played jazz trumpet.  Then he off he went to study English literature at Cambridge under the sway of F.R. Leavis who demanded only that the study of anything be productively engaged in the construction of a better world.   Like Grierson or fellow Leavis student, Robin Wood, Peter came to believe that film was his path to exactly that sort of critical engagement.   The early sixties found him working at the British Film Institute’s Education Department, contributing to he film journals of the day and eventually teaching film courses at a number of art schools around London.

England, as it turned out, was prologue.  In 1964, Peter wrote a long article for Sight and Sound about the National Film Board’s Unit B.  In it, we find that self-introduction to his own national cinema:

There is something very Canadian in all this, something which my own Canadianness prompts me to define.  There is in all these films a quality of suspended judgment, of something left open at the end, of something undecided…there is also something academic about the way Canadian films have been conceived.  There is something rather detached from the immediate pressures of existence, something rather apart.  “The Innocent Eye: An Aspect of the Work of the National Film Board of Canada” (Sight and Sound, 34, 1 (Winter, 1964-65), p. 21.

It seems to me that when Peter wrote this he had found his Leavis-mandated cause, the nexus of his critical work: a non-negotiable demand for purposeful detachment, manning the barricades of a space “rather apart.”

So began Peter’s second work of introduction, introducing this understanding of Canadian cinema, Canadianness, Canada to Canadians themselves.  He returned home to a perfect storm of cinematic energies: a crescendo of Canadian documentary at Expo and Challenge for Change; the chaos (creative and otherwise) of a newly subsidized feature film industry, a free for all of emerging talent finding its way into every genre.  Peter was hired to add one more ingredient to the mix: university film studies.   He founded the program at Queen’s in 1967, shaped the emerging York program beginning in 1974 and then went on to his permanent home, Carleton, in 1978.

Peter taught with humanity and passion, weaving together the cosmopolitan refinement gleaned from his London days and the pursuit of his Canadian mission. His classroom was a conversation that often spilled over to the campus pub.  No one was left unheard.  Peter’s former students smile at the sound of his name.

He also wrote – constantly and on everything from European masters and emerging experimental filmmakers to the minutiae of government film policy.   I don’t recall him attacking films or filmmakers, not even those of the New Hollywood, our principal nemesis.  What he did best was to champion filmmakers who mirrored his own discovery of detachment and the something rather apart.   His pantheon was made of cinematic slow food, filmmakers who could wait for the point to make itself.

Peter’s most lasting introduction – what I will remember him most for providing – was the introduction of all of us to each other.  His pursuit of Canadian cinema took place at the personal level, over who knows how many dinners over who knows how many years.  He always cited people, no matter how elevated their stature, by their first names.  This wasn’t entertainment sleaze-speak.    Peter really knew everyone across and well beyond the spectrum of Canadian cinema.  And he expected them to work for the common goal.  If there was an impenetrable cultural divide or a deathless ideological struggle going on, you would never know it from the people sitting at Peter’s table.  Not even the gender wars could shake his inclusiveness.   He told anyone who would listen that feminism was the Copernican Revolution of our times.  The cosmos, having shifted, wasn’t going to shift back.

That glad, gregarious, prolific acceptance of the future is Peter’s great legacy.  He writes in his memoirs[1] of being a child in the grey Pre-War English Canada, a soulless, frozen outpost of the dying British Empire.  After that, everything got better.  Thanks to Peter’s introductions, it also got better for everyone whose lives he touched. 



[1] A Canadian Journey: Conversations With Time.  Ottawa: Oberon Press, 1994.

 

Requisition Title: Lecturer – Film and Media Studies – 1401146
Job Field: Limited Term (Lecturer)
Faculty / Division: Faculty of Arts and Science
Department: Cinema Studies Institute
Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto)
Job Posting: Jun 9, 2014
Job Closing: Jul 10, 2014

Description:

The University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute (at Innis College) invites applications for a three-year limited-term teaching-stream appointment at the rank of Lecturer to begin August 1, 2014 or shortly thereafter and end June 30, 2017.

The Cinema Studies Institute is seeking applicants with extensive knowledge of film and media studies. The successful candidate will teach courses in cinema and related media at the undergraduate level in the Cinema Studies Institute (CSI). Ideally, the candidate will be equipped to teach courses currently offered by the Institute, a listing of which appears on the Institute website [http://www.utoronto.ca/cinema/undergradcourses.html]. Candidates must demonstrate evidence of excellence in teaching and have at least three years of experience teaching at the post-secondary level. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in Cinema Studies (or a related discipline) by time of appointment or shortly thereafter.

In particular, the candidate should have experience teaching larger, lecture-based survey courses and supervising teaching assistants. Areas that the candidate should have expertise in teaching include: introductory film analysis, film history, film theory, American cinema, and cinema and technology. While this position requires general knowledge of the fundamentals of film and media studies, candidates should also demonstrate specialization in an area that would complement CSI’s current course offerings.

Salary to be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

All qualified candidates are invited to apply online through the following link https://utoronto.taleo.net/careersection/10050/jobdetail.ftl?job=1401146 . Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply .We recommend combining documentation into one or two files in PDF/MS Word format.

Applications should include:

1) a cover letter of no more than two single-spaced pages, and containing a concise articulation of the candidate’s teaching philosophy;
2) a curriculum vitae;
3) a teaching dossier containing a list of courses taught, course syllabi, and teaching evaluations;
4) an example of published scholarship not exceeding twenty pages.

Candidates should also arrange to have three letters of recommendation focusing on their teaching abilities sent directly to cinema.studies@utoronto.ca .

The deadline for applications is July 10, 2014.

For more information about the Cinema Studies Institute, please consult http://www.utoronto.ca/cinema .
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given
priority.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes
applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, members
of sexual minority groups, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

 

SYNOPTIQUE Call For Papers

OUT OF THE DARK STACKS AND INTO THE LIGHT:

RE-VIEWING THE MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE FOR THE 21st CENTURY

 

The archive, as a concept, an action, and a physical repository of historical traces and material fragments, has a central place within contemporary film and moving image studies. The archive is not only a location for historical research; it also functions as a source of images and materials to be mined by filmmakers and media artists. Many studies of the archive have focused on these two dominant approaches to the use and formulation of moving image archives, especially in studies of documentary and avant-garde compilation or found footage cinema. Increasingly, film and media scholars are also turning to the archive to revise histories of film theory, film production, and its distribution and circulation, especially in post-colonial, historiographical, and transnational film scholarship. As such, the archive becomes as much a site of struggle and contested histories, as it is a site of creative inspiration and cultural preservation.

 

With the transnational and global turn in film scholarship, a greater analysis of the circulation and display of archival materials and moving images is necessary to understand how archival access might impact the current assessment of global and local shifts. In this special issue on the moving image archive, we wish to focus on both the sites of archival preservation and display of moving images (including museums, art galleries, institutional archives, private collections, and the Internet), as well as the circulatory and creative networks that connect them. In doing so, we intend to bring questions of circulation and exhibition into dialogue with the archive, in addition to a focus on the archive as a concept and method of artistic practice.

 

Submissions may include, but are not by any means limited to, topics such as:

  • Archival preservation, access, technologies, and practice
  • Archive as concept or methodology (landscape as archive, Internet archive, etc.)
  • Archival images in experimental films, videos, and games (compilation, found footage, database films, etc.)
  • Archives, gesture, sound, and performance
  • Digital archives and digitalization of archival materials
  • Documentary and the evidentiary uses of archival moving images
  • Colonial and postcolonial archives
  • Community organizations and archival display
  • Critiques of archival theory, media studies theory, and film theory
  • Global flows and circulation of archival materials and images
  • Institutional histories of a specific archive
  • New media, remix cultures, and the archive
  • Queer and feminist archives
  • Spaces of display and archival practice (museums, non-theatrical spaces, online databases, etc.)

 

Essay submissions for the peer-review section should be approximately 15-30 pages including the bibliography (maximum 7,500 words), and formatted according to MLA guidelines. This special issue is invested in exploring the archive in all its conceptual and practical manifestations, so we also welcome shorter pieces (2-8 pages, maximum 2,000 words) related to archival images or practice for our non-peer review section. This section includes conference or exhibition reports, book reviews, research creation pieces related to archival images or practice (including video essays, photograph series, and other digital projects accompanied by an explanatory text), and interviews with artists or archival practitioners.

 

All submissions must be in either French or English. Papers should be submitted by October 10, 2014. A link on www.synoptique.ca will guide you through the submission process. Feel free to contact us with any questions you may have at: editor.synoptique@gmail.com.

 

Please note the following two job postings on the WLU Faculty of Arts website (below):

http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=317&p=3142 (click on Faculty of Arts, click through to page 4). 

Click to download PDFs

Wilfrid Laurier Job #1 (The business of film)

Wilfrid Laurier Job #2 (Screenwriting and directing)