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Call For Proposals: The (re)Making of a Movement: New Perspectives on the 1960s Counterculture

Abstract Submission: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals
Contact: daniel.hambly@humber.ca, jennifer.marotta@humber.ca
Submission Deadline: May 30, 2019
Conference Date: October 26-27, 2019
Location: Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens’ Quay West, Toronto, Canada.
Host: Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Innovative Learning (FLA), Humber
College and the Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA)

Keynote Speaker:

Angela Davis
Activist, Author, Educator, and Scholar
 

It’s been 50 years since 400,000 people descended on Bethel, New York, for an event that became one of the most important cultural touchstones for a generation: Woodstock. As participants in an amorphous social movement the Woodstock Generation came to be defined in opposition to previous generations. Despite growing up in an era of incredible privilege, widespread government social programs, post-war housing and education, and increasing affluence, they rejected, or attempted to redefine traditional values. In theory, supporters of the counterculture rejected individualism, competition, and capitalism. Rejection of monogamy and the traditional nuclear family gave way to a communal ideal—disavowing individualism and private property in favour of shared food, work, sex. As historian Michael Doyle points out, the myth of Woodstock holds that “in a time of military conflict abroad, racial and ethnic strife at home, when a deep social division known as the ‘generation gap’ separated parents from children, nearly half a million young people removed themselves from proximity to these conflicts and went ‘back to the garden’ to try to ‘set their souls free’.” As such, Woodstock carries a certain symbolic weight for participants in the 1960s and 1970s counterculture movement and for anyone who looks back on the past fifty years with a critical eye.

The counterculture movement encompassed: the Civil Rights Movement, Free Speech, the New Left, Anti-war, Anti-nuclear, Feminism, Free school movement, Drug Culture, Environmentalism, Student Activism, Producerism, Gay liberation, the Sexual Revolution, and the rise of Hippies to innovations in fashion, music, film, and literature. The American poet John Perry Barlow once said: “I started out as a teenage beatnik and then became a hippie and then became a cyberpunk. And now I’m still a member of the counterculture, but I don’t know what to call that.” How have the various movements within the counterculture evolved over the past 50 years? What did hippies become? Who was the Sexual Revolution scripted for? How did the Civil Rights movement evolve? How did a generation that “dropped out” re-engage? How was this fringe culture appropriated by marketers? How challenging was it to live an ideal especially in light of the Cold War and rise of Reaganism?

Our conference committee welcomes individual presentation proposals of 300 words, and panel proposals (3 people max) of 900 words, based on any of the above themes.

This will be the sixth annual interdisciplinary conference held by Humber College’s Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Innovative Learning (FLA) of Toronto in association with the Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA), one of the most celebrated literary festivals in the world. It is located at the Harbourfront Centre, one of downtown Toronto’s major cultural and artistic venues.

Submit your proposal online: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals

 

CFP: Digital Feminist Activisms: The Performances and Practices of Online Public Assemblies

Editors: Dr. Shana MacDonald (University of Waterloo), Dr. Milena Radzikowska (Mount Royal University), Dr. Michelle MacArthur (University of Windsor), Brianna I. Wiens (York University)

With the rise of what Jessalyn Keller and Maureen Ryan have called “emergent feminism,” we are witnessing a moment marked by the “sudden reappearance” of strident critiques of gendered inequalities within popular discourse (2018, 2). More often than not, emergent feminisms are amplified online through social media by popular feminism and celebrity endorsements (BanetWeiser 2018, McRobbie 2009), which can problematically promote neoliberal values of individual consumer practices and competitive self-improvement as a forms of empowerment. And yet, access to social media has produced important and critical forms of feminist politics. In Notes Towards a Theory of Performative Assembly, Judith Butler (2015) advances the importance of bodies assembling in space as a form of protest that performatively asserts both “the right to appear” and demands “a livable life” for those in positions of precarity. While feminist visibility in the broader public eye has produced important dialogues, this politics of assembly simultaneously begs the question: “What about those who prefer not to appear, who engage in their democratic activism in another way?” (Butler 2015, 55). There are many valid and powerful reasons as to why feminist activists may want, or be able, to not appear given the dangerous climate of online spaces, rife with the violent misogyny of trolling culture. These forms of publicness and erasure are equally important to consider within current considerations of emergent feminist practices online.

This book seeks to gather provocations, analyses, creative explorations, and/or cases studies of digital feminist practices from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives including, but not limited to, media studies, communication studies, critical and cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, performance studies, digital humanities, feminist HCI, and feminist STS. The book frames digital feminisms as forms of public assembly that are performative and theatrical; that is, performative in that they can offer, “a process, a praxis, an episteme, a mode of transmission, an accomplishment, and a means of intervening in the world” (Diana Taylor 2003, 15), and theatrical in that they are events that may include characters, plot, the invocation of an audience, and the collective labour of multiple collaborators. In this way, digital feminist practices foster counterpublics––communities that enable “exchanges…distinct from authority” that “have a critical relation to power” (Michael Warner 2002, 56). This book seeks to consider how digital feminist activism uses conventions of assembly, performativity, theatricality, and design to counter the individualizing forces of postfeminist neoliberalism while foregrounding the types of systemic change so greatly needed, but often overlooked, in this climate.

List of possible topics:

  • Feminist hashtag activism; feminist, anti-racist, decolonial, LGBTQ+ hashtag movements
  • Closed virtual feminist communities and safe(r) spaces
  • Feminist and post-feminist forms of digital culture
  • Intersectional feminism online
  • LGBTQ+ digital cultures
  • Black, indigenous, and people of colour (BIPOC) digital cultures
  • Transnational digital feminism
  • Popular and celebrity feminism online
  • Feminist responses to online misogyny
  • Feminism and post-feminism on Instagram and/or Twitter
  • Feminist, queer, and BIPOC meme
  • Feminist, queer, and BIPOC design
  • Gamergate and implications of online misogyny in game culture
  • Methodological and/or theoretical approaches to feminist digital culture

Please submit a 250-350 word abstract, a brief author bio, and any questions to Brianna I. Wiens (bwiens@yorku.ca) by May 30th, 2019. Accepted submissions should be 6000-7000 words and will be due to the editors by November 1, 2019.

References

Banet-Weiser, Sarah. 2018. Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny. Duke University Press.

Butler, Judith. 2015. Notes Toward a Theory of Performative Assembly. Cambridge, Massachusetts. Harvard University Press.

Keller, Jessalynn and Maureen E. Ryan (eds). 2018. Emergent Feminisms: Complicating a Postfeminist Media Culture. Routledge.

McRobbie, Angela. 2008. The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change. Sage.

Taylor, Diana. 2003. The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Warner, Michael. 2002. “Publics and Counterpublics.” Public Culture 14(1): 49-90.

 
TWO DAYS OF CANADA 2019: CANADIAN SCREENS
BROCK UNIVERSITY, ST. CATHARINES, ON
NOVEMBER 7-9, 2019
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
 
Conference Theme
The annual Two Days of Canada conference program committee is seeking proposals for papers that explore the shifting terrain of contemporary Canadian screens. As a reprise of the engaging gathering of scholars and researchers at ‘Two Days of Canada 2006: Television in Canada,’ we hope to survey the current state of research on texts and contexts across the multiple sites and screens that have emerged from within and beyond the traditional terrain of television. Contemporary Canadian screens include television, film, web platforms, social media, digital games and cell phones, among others. How is content being produced, consumed, interpreted, circulated and regulated across these various screen spaces?  What are the historical, social, political, cultural and technological contexts shaping Canadian screen production and consumption?  How can traditional film and television theory be applied to emerging screen texts and practices? What research methodologies and critical approaches are best adapted to the study of contemporary Canadian screens? ‘Two Days of Canada 2019: Canadian Screens’ presents an exciting interdisciplinary venue for exploring these key questions. 
 
Conference Paper Topics
We seek individual paper or panel proposals from scholars and graduate students presenting current research on the topics listed below, or on other themes and topics relevant to the understanding of contemporary Canadian screens. 
  • Shifting practices of screen content production
  • Transnational and transmedia storytelling on Canadian screens
  • Production practices in screen industries
  • Evolving contexts of Canadian screen content policies 
  • Emerging digital content and gaming industries in Canada
  • Canadian fan cultures
  • Screen spaces: proliferation of screens in the built environment
  • Screen genres in Canada
  • Co-production and globalization of Canadian screen content

Submission Format and Deadlines
Please submit a 250-word abstract of your proposed paper, along with a 50-word biographical statement about yourself, to the conference organizers at canadianstudies@brocku.ca. Proposals for a panel of three to five presenters comprised of separate abstracts for each paper are also welcome and may be submitted by a single contact person on behalf of the panel members.  

  • Proposals due August 2nd, 2019
  • Decisions communicated by August 15, 2019
  • Conference registration open on EventBrite, August 15, 2019
  • Early bird registration closes September 30, 2019
  • Final registration closes November 7, 2019  
 
For More Information
  • Contact: canadianstudies@brocku.ca.
  • Conference Program Committee: Marian Bredin, Brian deRuiter, Anthony Kinik, Peter Lester, Sarah Matheson.
 

The Collaborative Research Centre 1015 “Muße. Grenzen, Raumzeitlichkeit, Praktiken”(“Otium: Boundaries, Chronotopes, Practices“) in the context of the project “Immersion and leisure in the theme park: media landscapes near Ontario Place (Toronto, 1971-2011)” led by Prof. Dr. Robin Curtis at the Institute for Media and Cultural Studies at the Albrecht-Ludwigs-Universität in Freiburg, Germany is seeking to immediately fill the position of

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Fee group 13 TV-L (100 %), starting date: as soon as possible

The research fellow will be employed within a highly dynamic research environment that offers a variety of intellectual stimuli. The position includes challenging tasks in the project “Immersion and leisure in Theme Park: Media Landscapes at Ontario Place (Toronto, 1971-2011)”, which explores how immersion and leisure are connected. In particular, the multimedia exhibition strategies and leisure experiences in the recreation and theme park Ontario Place and the practices of its use will be researched. On the basis of a group of test persons who experienced Ontario Place between 1971 and 1983 as contemporary witnesses, the research project conducted by the postdoctoral researcher will examine the individual practices of using the park. This will be done in close cooperation with the research project of the funding applicant, Robin Curtis, who will reconstruct and analyse the multimedia exhibition configurations in the park.

The tasks of the research assistant include, among others

  • Collaboration in the overall research project on the relationship between immersion and leisure in the Theme Park: Media Landscapes near Ontario Place (Toronto, 1971-2011);
  • Analysis of the practices of the use of the park by means of walking interviews on site in Toronto in 2019;
  • Participation in project publications as well as independent publications in relevant journals and presentations (national/international) in the project context; 
  • Participation in the conception, organization and realization of a conference within the framework of the Collaborative Research Center “Muße”/”Otium.”
  • The project that has just been approved has a shortened duration and this requires a willingness to orient oneself quickly in the already ongoing second approval period of the Collaborative Research Centre.
    Hiring requirements: 
  • Doctorate in media studies, cultural studies and/or empirical cultural studies, (qualitative) sociology, or related subjects;
  • Experience in field research;
  • Good knowledge of software for the management and evaluation of qualitative data (MAXQDA) and willingness to acquire it;
  • Interest in teamwork in a large interdisciplinary research network;
  • Excellent English, basic knowledge of German.

The position is limited until 31.12.2020 (due to the funding of the DFG until the end of the second SFB funding period). Remuneration is according to TV-L E13.

For the position advertised here, we are particularly pleased about applications from women.

Please apply with a cover letter, a CV, a list of publications as well as copies of all certificates of qualification stating the reference number 00000455 by 12.04.2019 at the latest. 

Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg
Institute for Media Cultural Studies
Prof. Dr. Robin Curtis
79085 Freiburg im Breisgau

Please direct applications, preferably in electronic form (in a pdf file with a maximum of 10 MB), to sekretariat.curtis@mkw.uni-freiburg.de
For further information please contact Elissa Wittke at +49 761 203-98627 or e-mail elissa.wittke@mkw.uni-freiburg.de

 

Film Studies Association of Canada Graduate Student Essay Prize

(La version française suit ci-dessous)

All current students are invited to submit an essay written as part of their graduate studies as application for the 2019 Film Studies Association of Canada Graduate Student Essay Prize. The recipient will be announced during the FSAC Annual General Meeting during Congress at the University of British Columbia (June 4 to 6).

The selected essay will demonstrate maturity and sophistication of argument, be a clear and direct engagement with the discipline of Film Studies (broadly defined), be provocative and stimulating and have the potential for publication.

Eligibility:

  • Students must be registered in a graduate program for at least one semester in the school year prior to the deadline.
  • If the paper has more than one author; all authors must be registered graduate students and members of the association.
  • Papers submitted for review to a scholarly journal (even if not yet accepted) are not eligible.
  • Papers are submitted by the author(s), not a supervisor or faculty advisor.
  • Students must be fully paid members of FSAC at the time that they submit their paper for consideration. Previous winners may not submit entries.
  • Essays resulting from research conducted under the Gerald Pratley Award may not be submitted, but Pratley winners may submit essays on other topics.

Application process:

Papers are evaluated by a blind-review process.

  • Do not include any identifying information of authorship or home institution in the body of the paper.
  • Submit by email as MSWord attachment
  • Place identifying contact information (author name(s), institution, contact information and essay title) in the body of the email.
  • Attach the paper with the title at the top of the first page.
  • Double-­space and number your pages.
  • Essays should fall between 5000 and 7500 words in length.

A committee of executive members of the association, including a graduate student representative, will select the recipient.

The president will receive and distribute the applicants but will not participate in adjudication.

Send applications to: Peter Lester – plester@brocku.ca
Deadline: April 30, 2019

The selected paper is expected to be revised and submitted for publication consideration with the Canadian Journal of Film Studies. Feedback from the journal reviewers is a major benefit of this award.

————

Prix de l’essai étudiant de l’Association canadienne d’études cinématographiques

Les étudiants et les étudiantes présentement inscrit(e)s dans un programme d’études supérieures sont invité(e)s à soumettre un texte critique réalisé dans le cadre de leurs études de 2 e et 3 e cycle pour le prix du meilleur essai critique de l’Association canadienne d’études cinématographiques. Le gagnant ou la gagnante sera annoncé(e) lors de l’assemblée générale de l’association dans le cadre de la conférence annuelle qui se déroulera cette année à l’Université de Colombie-­Britannique (4-­6 juin 2019).

Le texte primé devra démontrer une maturité et une sophistication critique, offrir clairement et directement une contribution à la discipline des études cinématographiques (au sens large), se distinguer par son originalité, se pertinence et son potentiel de publication.

Éligibilité:

  • Les étudiant(e)s doivent être inscrit(e)s dans un programme de 2e ou 3e cycle depuis au moins un semestre dans l’année académique qui précède l’échéance;
  • Si le texte à plus d’un auteur, tous les auteurs doivent être étudiant(e)s et membres de l’association;
  • Les articles déjà soumis à des revues scientifiques (et même s’ils n’ont pas encore été acceptés) ne sont pas éligibles ; • Les articles doivent être soumis par le candidat ou la candidate, et non par le directeur ou la directrice de recherche ou le ou la responsable de l’unité académique;
  • Les étudiant(e)s doivent être membres de l’association au moment de soumettre leurs textes au comité. Les gagnant(e)s des années précédentes ne sont pas admis(es);
  • Les textes découlant de recherches réalisées dans le cadre du Prix Gerald Pratley ne sont pas admis, bien que des récipiendaires du prix Pratley peuvent soumettre des textes, mais ceux-­‐ci devront porter sur un autre sujet.

Démarche à suivre:

Les articles sont évalués à l’aveugle par un comité de pairs.

  • Ne pas inclure des informations d’identification, ni le nom de votre institution dans le corps du texte;
  • Le texte doit être joint à un courriel, en format MSWord;
  • Le titre doit apparaître au haut de la première page du texte;
  • Le texte doit être à double interligne et paginé.
  • Les essais doivent compter entre 5000 et 7500 mots.

Un comité formé par des membres de l’exécutif de l’association, comprenant le représentant étudiant, sélectionnera le gagnant ou la gagnante.

Le président recevra et distribuera les candidatures mais ne participera pas au processus d’évaluation.

Envoyez vos soumissions à : Peter Lester – plester@brocku.ca

Date limite: 30 avril 2019

Il est attendu que le texte sélectionné soit révisé et soumis pour publication à la Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques. Les retours des évaluateurs de la revue forme un des bénéfices de ce prix.

 

Please find below a PRELIMINARY Schedule for our Annual Conference, Tuesday to Thursday, 4-6 June 2019.

Veuillez trouver ci-dessous une PROGRAMME PRÉLIMINAIRE pour notre colloque annuelle, mardi au jeudi, 4 à 6 juin 2019.

FSAC/ACÉC 2019 Preliminary Program / Programme Préliminaire [15/03/2019]

 

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Tier II Canada Research Chair in Media, Culture and the Environment
Trent University

Trent University invites applications from emerging scholars with a strong research profile for a Tier II Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Media, Culture, and the Environment. We are interested in candidates working on any subject in the intersection of the environmental humanities, media studies, and cultural studies, and from many different methodological approaches.

As a faculty member appointed to both the Department of Cultural Studies and the Trent School of the Environment (TSE), the CRC will have a strong multi-disciplinary background and the demonstrated potential to collaborate with faculty in the humanities and the social and natural sciences. The successful candidate will develop a personal five-year research plan within a collaborative institutional context: they will teach one or more courses in undergraduate degree programs associated with Cultural Studies and the TSE, and they will supervise graduate students in one or more MA or PhD programs, including Canadian Studies, Cultural Studies, Environmental and Life Sciences, Indigenous Studies, and Sustainability Studies. Additionally, they will benefit from research centres and groups including the Centre for the Study of Theory, Culture, and Politics, the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies, the Institute of Integrative Conservation Biology, and the Communicating Conservation Science Research Group.

As a Tier II CRC, the candidate must be an emerging scholar, which means that they will have received their PhD no more than ten years ago. At the same time, they should be an emerging world-class researcher who has demonstrated the sort of creative research and leadership that can attract, develop and retain excellent students and future researchers. Most importantly, the candidate must propose an original, innovative research program of high quality. Applicants who are more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree (and where career breaks exist, such as maternity, parental or extended sick leave, clinical training, etc.) will have their eligibility for a Tier 2 Chair assessed through the program’s Tier 2 justification process. More information can be found on the Canada Research Chairs’ website.

CRCs are highly competitive research professorships funded by the Government of Canada through the Canada Research Chairs Program. As such, the successful candidate will emphasize research over teaching and administrative responsibilities: CRCs typically teach one course each semester. They will be appointed as a tenure-track Assistant or Associate Professor to Trent University for a five year term, renewable once. The Trent appointment will be conditional on a successful Canada Research Chair nomination.

Application materials must be sent as one pdf file and include the subject line “Tier II CRC in Media, Culture, and the Environment.” By April, 30 2019, applicants should electronically submit the following to Cathy Gates, Director Office of Research and Innovation:

  1. A signed letter of application;
  2. A 5 year research plan (including your intentions for mentoring graduate and post-graduate students);
  3. A teaching philosophy (including your experiences in increasing equity, diversity, an inclusion in previous institutional environments and curricula and in supporting diverse students);
  4. A copy of your three most influential publications;
  5. A current CV;
  6. A completed self-identification form; and
  7. The names of three referees.

We respectfully acknowledge that we are on the treaty and traditional territory of the Mississauga Anishinaabeg. We offer our gratitude to the First Peoples for their care for, and teachings about, our earth and our relations. May we honour those teachings. Recognized as Canada’s outstanding environmental university, Trent has an extensive riverfront campus, including several nature reserves; less than two hours from Toronto, Ontario, it attracts a diverse student body.

Trent University is actively committed to creating an equitable, diverse and inclusive campus community and encourages applications from all qualified candidates. The University especially welcomes applications from the members of the four designated groups (applicants who identify as women, Indigenous people, racialized people, and people with disabilities). Recruitment will be guided by the Canada Research Chairs Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Practices, the Trent University Canada Research Chair Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan and by the University’s commitment to employment equity and diversity. Training and development activities related to unconscious bias, equity, diversity and inclusion for administrators and faculty involved in the recruitment and nomination processes for chair positions is mandatory.

All Candidates are invited to complete and submit a self-identification form alongside their application. By identifying, CRC applicants allow Trent University, and the Canada Research Chair Program, to measure the levels of diversity and collect data for all groups to ensure any systemic barriers within our policies and processes can be identified. The collected forms, and their associated data, will be kept confidential, and only accessed on a need-to-know basis by members of the selection committee and, for nominees selected, by the Canada Research Chair Program Office.

Trent University recognizes the impacts that interruptions (e.g., parental leave, extended leave due to illness, etc.) can have on a person’s career and research achievements, and these leaves will be carefully considered when reviewing the candidate’s record. Candidates are encouraged to explain in their application how career interruptions may have impacted them.

Trent University offers accommodation for applicants with disabilities in its recruitment processes. If you require accommodation during the recruitment process or require an accessible version of a document/publication, please contact Cathy Gates, Office of Research and Innovation.

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Digital Media Arts and Communication, Tenure-Track Assistant Professor
University of Waterloo

The Department of Communication Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for a tenure track Assistant Professor position in digital media arts and communication.

Based in a liberal arts faculty, in a research-intensive university, the Department of Communication Arts has undergraduate programs in Speech Communication, Theatre & Performance, and Digital Arts Communication, and currently serves approximately 200 majors and 150 minors. In addition, the Department delivers approximately 100 sections of communication courses to students from several different programs across the University.

The successful candidate will have an exceptional research and/or practitioner profile, demonstrated excellence in teaching, and a background in digital media/arts and communication. Applicants are expected to have a PhD in hand or be ABD with dissertation near completion. Ideal candidates will bring an ability to contribute to the Digital Arts Communication minor, the Speech Communication major, and courses designed and delivered for students from across the university. In addition, candidates will be expected to contribute to the integration of digital arts practice into courses across the department. It is expected that the candidate will be engaged in scholarship or creative activities associated with digital arts as both a mode of production and an area of theoretical and critical inquiry. In particular, candidates may have expertise in digital design, interactive media, digital storytelling, game design, tangible media, online digital platforms, or some other related area. A demonstrated pedagogical commitment to theoretically informed practice, student-centered learning, and engagement of broad public issues is desirable. Additional expertise in critical race, indigenous, dis/ability, trans, feminist, and/or queer approaches to the practice and study digital media and communication are welcome. Ideal applicants will have a high degree of technological literacy, the ability to secure external funding, collaborative potential with other faculty across the University, the ability to engage in outreach activities with industry in their area and be able to contribute to the growth of the department. The salary range for this position at the Assistant Professor rank is $80,000 to $100,000. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Applications must include the following: letter of application addressed to Dr. Robert Danisch (Department Chair), CV, one sample scholarly publication, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and three confidential letters of recommendation.

Qualified candidates should complete an online application at: http://artsofas.uwaterloo.ca/communication-arts

Deadline to apply: April 18, 2019

The University of Waterloo regards diversity as an integral part of academic excellence and is committed to employment equity and accessibility for all employees. As such, we encourage applications from women, Indigenous (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) peoples, persons with disabilities, members of diverse gender identities, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. At Waterloo, you will have the opportunity to work across disciplines and collaborate with an international community of scholars and a diverse student body, situated in a rapidly growing community that has been termed a “hub of innovation”. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will receive priority in the recruitment process.

Three reasons to apply: http://uwaterloo.ca/fauw/why

 

***la version française suit***

The Neutral is excited to announce the call for papers for issue #2 on the theme of  Period. We hope you will distribute this call to graduate students and interested faculty. Please see text below or attached PDF (French translation included). Please email submissions to theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com by June 1st, 2019.

 
The Neutral is a new, peer-reviewed media studies journal based out of the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. The Neutral is committed to a diversity of disciplinary approaches and media objects of study. It is published online at: www.theneutraljournal.com
 
Call for Papers: PERIOD
The Neutral Journal
University of Toronto
Period.
A special issue on Environmental Media and Punctuation.
 
A period is a temporal marker: it designates both the span of a duration and the instant of an end. In physics, a period is the recurrent temporal loop of a wave’s frequency; in history, it represents events artificially bounded by dates for narrative purposes; in gynecology, it is the colloquial expression of menstruation; in grammar, it terminates the sentence. For geologists, a period stretches to the length of a hundred million years and is subdivided into epochs. Hypothetical geologists, working a hundred million years from now, will be able to identify our epoch, now labelled the Anthropocene, thanks to traces left by climate change, extinctions, and radioactive isotopes in the paper-thin sedimentary layer that will represent our era. That the Anthropocene projects geologists into the future, far past the end of the world it simultaneously predicts, demonstrates some of the paradoxical logic bound up in its anthropocentric periodization.
 
The end of the world is unevenly distributed, occurring at different times for different beings and things. For instance, the world has already ended for a species of Hawaiian tree snail, Achatinella apexfulva. The last individual of the species died in captivity at fourteen years of age on New Year’s Day, 2019. On this day both the snail and the species it constituted came to a point, full stop. The extinction of this tree snail can be attributed to the introduction of an invasive species by the invasive species par excellenceHomo sapiens. The end of the world for the tree snail is therefore a part of the anthropogenic extinction event—thought to be, as Elizabeth Kolbert suggests, only the sixth such moment in the history of life on planet Earth.
 
Humanity is not living through the simultaneous, universal doomsday predicted by so many eschatological enthusiasts, but rather the uneven punctuation of species, narratives, epochs, and even islands. Many indigenous and colonized people, for example, are already living in a post-apocalyptic world. Though the Anthropocene is useful for representing the planetary scale of human influence, its imagination of the end is consistent with many human predictions and depictions of a universal apocalypse: namely, it presents “the end” as globally homogenous and simultaneous. We know, however, that western capitalist corporations are overwhelmingly responsible for environmental effects suffered predominantly by marginalized people in the Global South and elsewhere. In Future Remains: A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene Rob Nixon asks, “Doesn’t lumping together under the sign of the human the average twenty-first-century Liberian and the average twenty-first-century American as agents of planetary change risk concealing more than it reveals?” (2018, 8). Though the West imagines an evenly distributed “end,” how might we reconceive the heterogeneity of the period, of “ends”? What can the study of media reveal about our current environmental period?
 
In light of these questions, The Neutral seeks submissions that deal with mediated imaginations of periods—as temporal significations that mark everything from the end of a sentence to the span of geological epochs—with a view to complicating traditional ideas about apocalypse generally, and the Anthropocene specifically.
 
Some potential avenues of investigation include:
  • Our understandings of such broad concepts as “the earth,” “nature,” “climate,” and “media” have become increasingly partisan and increasingly fixed—climate science is truth and the self-made destruction of the human is total and imminent, or climate science is untruth created and promulgated for the purposes of anti-industrial, anti-capitalist fear mongering. How has media worked to industrially, formally, and narratively construct and dismantle the ahistorical, western and anthropocentric teleologies of both of these perspectives?
  • Can attempts to re-articulate the idea of the Anthropocene steer us past some of its pitfalls? Are there merits to some of the proposed alternatives to the Anthropocene—such as: Bernard Stiegler’s Neganthropocene, Donna Haraway’s Chthulucene, and the Capitalocene—or are these geo-logisms just obscene?
  • How might the temporal and non-anthropocentric critiques of media archaeology (Jussi Parikka’s Geology of Media, for example) be brought to bear on the strictures of the geological record? Have historically underserved media forms offered potential avenues of inquiry that suggest signposts around our mediated obsessions with destruction and its immanence?
  • Serialized storytelling presents complications for the rhetorical period and periods in media. Whether the problem of what constitutes an ending of or in a series, the issue of periods of quality or weakness in a series, or the turning of a period into an ellipsis through cliffhangers, easter eggs, or post-credits scenes, the expansion of serialized storytelling in moving image media challenges classical conceptions of narrative structure and cohesion. How might our conceptualizations of seriality and narrative structure need to adapt to this transformation of the period into other rhetorical forms of narrative closure (or lack thereof)?
  • The body as a bearer of time: Surely, any marker of time is bound to chronicle time incompletely. The menstrual period, as a marker of duration and cycle—a stretch of days with monthly returns—is only a fractional account of the indefinite time of ongoing bodily operations. How is time catalogued or uncatalogued in the corporeal realm? In what ways do geological periods become inscribed on the body?  How is the concept of the period, in both marking out and terminating stretches of time, experienced through bodies on screen? How does the body mediate periods for us?

*       *       *

Please submit completed essays:
  • Between 5,000-7,000 words in length, including endnotes and citations
  • As a word document in Chicago style
  • To theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com with the subject line “Period Submission”
  • With name and affiliation included in body of email only
  • By June 1st, 2019

 

The Neutral est un nouveau périodique d’études médiatiques évalué par les pairs. Issue de l’Institut d’Études Cinématographiques de l’Université de Toronto, The Neutra se dédie à l’étude d’objets médiatiques divers selon une approche multidisciplinaire. Le journal est publié en ligne au: www.theneutraljournal.com

Pour sa seconde édition, The Neutral sollicite des contributions pour…

Period.
A special issue on Environmental Media and Punctuation

Un point est un marqueur temporel qui désigne à la fois l’étendue d’une durée et l’instant d’une fin. Tout comme la period en anglais, le point est à la fois une portion de l’espace ou du temps déterminée avec précision et considérée abstraitement pour localiser un phénomène, ainsi qu’une portion de l’espace dont toutes les dimensions linéaires sont nulles. Au début du 19 ième siècle, la « période » désigne aussi simultanément la durée plus ou moins longue d’une manifestation physiologique, la fameuse période menstruelle par exemple, ainsi que la durée géologique, ces grandes divisions chronologiques de l’histoire de la terre, ellesmêmes divisées en époques. Cette période géologique permet plus spécifiquement d’imaginer un cadre structurel dans lequel d’hypothétiques géologues, travaillant à un million d’années du présent, seront vraisemblablement en mesure d’identifier notre époque que nous nommons Anthropocène grâce aux traces laissées par les changements climatiques, les extinctions, ainsi que les isotopes radioactifs présents dans les minces couches sédimentaires. Que l’Anthropocène projette ainsi des géologues du futur bien après la fin du monde qu’elle prédit simultanément démontre quelques-unes des approches paradoxales de cette périodisation anthropocentrique.

La fin du monde se déploie de manière inégale, s’organisant déjà autour de diverses êtres et choses. Par exemple, le monde s’est déjà conclu pour l’espèce d’escargot hawaïen Achatinella apexfulva. Le dernier individu de l’espèce est mort en captivité à l’âge de 14 ans au jour de l’an 2019. À ce moment, cet individu et son espèce ont atteint un point mort, une fin. L’extinction de cette espèce d’escargot peut être attribuée à l’introduction d’une espèce envahissante par l’espèce envahissante par excellence. Homo sapiens. La fin du monde pour l’Achatinella apexfulva fait donc partie de l’événement d’extinction anthropogénique – seulement le sixième événement du genre sur la planète Terre selon Elizabeth Kolbert.

L’humanité ne vit pas le jugement dernier simultané et universel prédit par l’argument eschatologique. Elle fait plutôt face à une extinction ponctuelle et inégale des espèces, des narratives, des époques et même des îles. Par exemple, plusieurs peuples autochtones et colonisés vivent déjà dans un monde post-apocalyptique. Bien que l’Anthropocène soit un outil utile pour représenter la dimension planétaire de l’influence humaine, sa caractérisation de la fin participe d’une tendance humaine à prédire et caractériser une apocalypse universelle : on y présente une « fin » globalement homogène et simultanée. Nous savons par contre que les compagnies occidentales sont largement responsables des effets environnementaux dont souffrent majoritairement les populations marginalisées du Sud et d’ailleurs. Dans son livre Future Remains : A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene Rob Nixon demande : « Doesn’t lumping together under the sign of the human the average twenty-first-century Liberian and the average twenty-first-century American as agents of planetary change risk concealing more than it reveals? » (2018, 8). Bien que l’occident imagine une distribution simultanée de la “fin”, comment pourrions-nous faire le point et reconsidérer l’hétérogénéité de la période, des « fins »? Qu’est-ce que les études médiatiques peuvent nous révéler sur la présente période environnementale?

À la lueur de ces questionnements, The Neutral lance un appel pour des propositions d’article traitant de l’imagination médiatisée des périodes, ces points de repère qui forment des abstractions spatio-temporelles et marquent autant la fin d’une phrase que l’étendue d’une période géologique. Le numéro a pour objectif de compliquer nos idées traditionnelles du concept de période en général, et des périodes qui traitent de la fin de manière plus spécifique, de l’apocalypse à l’Anthropocène.

Voici quelques exemples d’approches potentielles :

  • Notre compréhension de sujets aussi vastes que « la terre », « la nature », « le climat », ainsi que la « médiatisation » se situe de plus en plus à l’intérieur d’une partisanerie rigide : d’un côté la science du climat est la vérité et la destruction humaine est totale et imminente; de l’autre la science du climat est une contrevérité véhiculée à des fins anti-industrielles et anticapitalistes. Comment la médiatisation a-t-elle pu construire et démantelé de manière industrielle, formelle et narrative les téléologies anhistoriques, occidentales et anthropocentriques de ces deux perspectives?
  • Est-ce que les efforts de redéfinition de l’Anthropocène nous aident vraiment à contrecarrer ses principales pierres d’achoppement? Est-ce qu’un bienfondé réside dans les propositions alternatives à l’Anthropocène qu’on retrouve chez Bernard Stiegler (Néganthropocène), Donna Haraway (Chtulucene) et Jason Moore (Capitalocene), ou est-ce que ces positions ne sont que des géo-logismes obscènes?
  • Comment les critiques temporelles et non anthropocentriques de l’archéologie des médias (Geology of Media de Jussi Parikka, par exemple) peuvent-elles nous aider à entrevoir les critiques de la périodisation géologique? Nos formes médiatiques historiquement asservies nous offrent-elles d’intéressantes avenues d’interrogation en tant que catalyseur de nos obsessions à l’égard de la médiatisation de la destruction et de son immanence?
  • La narration sérialisée complique à la fois la présente rhétorique de la période narrative ainsi que la périodisation générale des époques médiatiques. Qu’on se concentre sur ce qui représente la fin dans une série ou la fin d’une série; sur la problématique des périodes de qualités ou de faiblesses d’une série; ou sur la transformation de la période d’une série en ellipse à travers les procédés de cliffhanger, easter eggs, et de scènes cachées, l’importance de la narration sérialisée dans les médias audiovisuels vient déstabiliser nos conceptions narratives traditionnelles reliées aux principes de structure et de cohésion. De quelle manière nos conceptions de sérialité et de structure narrative devront-elles s’adapter à cette transformation de la période en de nouvelles formes rhétoriques de dénouement (ou d’absence de dénouement) narratif?
  • Le corps comme ancrage temporel : bien évidemment, n’importe quel marqueur temporel est destiné à échouer une tâche de représentation complète. La période menstruelle, en tant que marqueur d’une durée et d’un cycle – une étendue de jours à l’intérieur d’une répétition mensuelle – n’est que le compte-rendu fractionnel du temps indéfini des opérations corporelles continuelles. Comment cataloguons-nous le temps, ou comment renions-nous ce catalogage du temps, dans le domaine corporel? De quelle manière les périodes géologiques s’inscrivent-elles sur le corps? Comment les concepts de la période et du point (punctum) en tant que marqueurs de l’étendue d’une durée et de l’instant d’une fin sont-ils éprouvés par des corps à l’écran? Comment est-ce que le corps médiatise des périodes pour nous?

Veuillez s’il-vous-plaît soumettre des articles complets

  • entre 5000 et 7000 mots, incluant citations et notes de bas de page;
  • dans un format word, au format bibliographique Chicago;
  • à notre theneutralcinemajournal@gmail.com avec l’objet « Period submission »;
  • avec votre nom et affiliation inclus dans le corps de votre courriel seulement;
  • d’ici le 1er Juin, 2019.
 

***la version française suit***

Deadline for submission is April 30, 2018.

Call for Submissions: “Animating LGBTQ+ Representations: Queering the Production of Movement”

Special Issue of Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies

At the heart of animation is movement, and the expression of movement is negotiated differently across media. How then do LGBTQ+ communities reappropriate the specificities of animation, comics, videogames, and other forms of visual representations that rely on putting bodies into motion? How does animation support the emergence of social and political movements from within, between, and outside media production spaces? Since 2010, studies of LGBTQ+ representation in animation have steadily increased in number. From queer readings (Halberstram 2011), to media histories (McLelland, Nagaike, Suganuma, Welker 2015), to queer media makers (such as bisexual, non-binary creator Rebecca Sugar and other queer animators like Noelle Stevenson and Chris Nee), animation production has become a vital site for the study, performance, and persistence of queer media practices. Although much conversation has been devoted to queer readings of texts in transmedia movements, the people, circuits, and institutions of queer animated media production have attracted significantly less attention.  

By focusing on the “politics of movement,” we intend to grasp the convergence of 1) common techniques of animation in and across multiple media platforms, 2) means of mobile image production both amateur and industrial, and 3) social agendas in queer communities using the motion of images to negotiate their representation and place in society. While this issue will brush up against the various transmedia (narrative-based, Jenkins, 2008), media mix (image-based, Steinberg, 2012) and cross-media (toy-based, Nogami, 2015) models and their cultural geographies across the globe, our central aim here is to expand the knowledge and visibility of LGBTQ+ sociopolitical projects evolving conjointly with the creation and circulation of animated images. Producing movement in, across, and outside of media extends the synchronization of images to networks of commodities, territories, and peoples. Although an important amount of scholarship tends to address this question as the “queering of texts,” we seek another point of view coming directly from the creation of moving images itself. Such production practices are also imbricated in and respond to geo-political and cultural contexts. How then does the movement in between frames, vignettes, illustrations, and memes (to name a few examples) initiate social action (be it just to produce pornography for marginalized communities or to create conventions for amateur artists and publics to meet)? 

This issue of Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies will focus on queer media practices and the politics of movement. When animating LGBTQ+ images, media creators are also mobilizing queer practices, communities, and identities. Therefore, we are particularly interested in analyses and testimonies that examine sites of queer media production and their animation techniques, strategies, and practices. We encourage contributions that examine the interactions of animation within media related to animation, such as comics and videogames, as forms of queer movement often overflow and interact throughout multiple media platforms (Hemmann, 2015). We also invite submissions of artwork either from queer-identifying artists and practitioners, or pieces that explore queer movement, embodiment, and existence. Interviews, manifestos, essays, and other forms of writing on animated movement in queer media making are warmly welcome, as are multimedia contributions. 

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The industrial or amateur structures of LGBTQ+ images production
  • Movement in LGBTQ+ pornography and erotika
  • Queer movement in comics, visual novels, videogames, etc. 
  • The strategies and places of queered images (“Queer” Media mix, Marketing, Festivals, and Conventions)
  • Animated media production of the Global South (such as Brazilian Netflix show Super Drags)
  • Distribution networks for LGBTQ+ animated series (TV, platforms, VOD)
  • LGBTQ+ representations in animated media emerging from manga including both more mainstream (Boy’s Love, Yuri) and subcultural (so-called Bara or Gachimuchi) productions
  • Local LGBTQ+ communities and their struggles expressed through moving images
  • Queer movement across comics and animation
  • Decolonizing sexualities
  • Cosplay as queer (re)animation

 We use a broad interpretation of LGBTQ+ identity, including Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Trans*, Queer/Questioning, Two-Spirit, Intersex, Agender, Asexual, Pansexual, Genderqueer, Genderfluid, Non-binary, X-gender, Genderfuck, etc.

Essays submitted for peer review should be approximately 5,500-7,500 words and must conform to the Chicago author-date style (17th ed.). All images must be accompanied by photo credits and captions.

We also warmly invite submissions to the review section, including conference or exhibition reports, film festival reports, and interviews related to the aforementioned topics. All non-peer review articles should be a maximum of 2,500 words and include a bibliography following Chicago author-date style (17th ed.).

Multimedia works such as digital video, gifs, still images, or more (surprise us!) are also welcome. Works under 8MB may by hosted directly on the Synoptique site; anything larger must be uploaded to an external site (Youtube, Vimeo, etc). Please contact the Synoptique Board for more information on the procedures to submit artworks.

All submissions may be written in either French or English.

Please submit completed essays or reports to the Editorial Collective (editor.synoptique@gmail.com) issue guest editors, Kevin J. Cooley (kevin.cooley@ufl.edu), Edmond (Edo) Ernest dit Alban (ernestedo@gmail.com), and Jacqueline Ristola (jacqueline.ristola@gmail.com), by April 30. We will send notifications of acceptance by June 30.    

Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies

www.synoptique.ca


Appel à contributions: Animer les représentations LGBTQ+ :
La production du mouvement sous une optique queer

Numéro spécial de Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies

Au coeur de l’animation se trouve le mouvement, et l’expression du mouvement est traitée différemment à travers les médias. Ainsi, de quelles façons les communautés LGBTQ+ peuvent-elles se réapproprier les spécificités de l’animation, des bandes dessinées, des jeux vidéo, et d’autres formes de représentations visuelles se formant autour du corps en mouvement? Comment l’animation peut- elle supporter l’émergence des mouvements sociaux et politiques depuis l’intérieur et l’extérieur des espaces de productions médiatiques, ou entre ceux-ci? Depuis 2010, les études sur les représentations LGBTQ+ n’ont cessé de croître en nombre. Des lectures queer (Halberstram 2011), à l’histoire des médias (McLelland, Nagaike, Suganuma, Welker, 2015), aux créateur.rice.s de média queer (comme l’artiste bisexuel.le et non-binaire Rebecca Sugar, et autres animateur.rice.s queer tels Noelle Stevenson et Chris Nee), le domaine de la production d’animation est devenu un élément vital pour l’étude, la performance, et la persistance des pratiques médiatiques queer. Bien que les lectures queer de textes portant sur les mouvements transmédiatiques aient reçu une bonne part d’attention, celles consacrées aux personnes, aux circuits, et aux institutions d’animations médiatiques queer sont bien moindres.

En se concentrant sur la « politique du mouvement », notre intention est de cerner la convergence entre 1) les techniques d’animation communes à plusieurs plateformes médiatiques, 2) les moyens de production d’images mobiles, amateurs et industriels, et 3) les agendas sociaux des communautés queer faisant usage du mouvement de l’image afin de négocier leur place et leur représentation dans la société. Ce numéro touchera brièvement aux différents modèles tel le transmédia (fondé sur la narration, Jenkins, 2008), le média mix (fondé sur l’image, Steinberg, 2012), et le cross-media (foné sur les jouets, Nogami, 2015), ainsi que leurs géographies culturelles à travers le monde. Cependant, notre objectif principal est d’approfondir les connaissances et la visibilité des projets sociopolitiques LBTQ+ impliquant conjointement la création et la circulation des images animées. La production de mouvement de l’intérieur, à travers, et à l’extérieur des médias étend la synchronisation d’images aux réseaux de commodités, de territoires, et de personnes. Habituellement, une importante part des ressources académiques adresse ces questions sous l’angle de queering the texts; nous cherchons un autre point de vue venant directement de la création des images elle-même. Avec cela en tête, comment les mouvements entre les plans, les vignettes, les illustrations, et les memes, pour en citer quelques-uns, incitent-ils à une action sociale (pensons à la production pornographique pour les communautés marginalisées, ou à la création de conventions pour que les artistes amateur.rice.s et le public puissent se rencontrer)?

Ce numéro de Synoptique : An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies se concentrera sur les pratiques médiatiques queer et la politique du mouvement. En animant des images LGBTQ+, les créateur.rice.s de média mobilisent également des pratiques, des communautés et des identités queer. Nous sommes donc particulièrement intéressés aux analyses et témoignages portant sur la production de média queer, ainsi que leurs stratégies, techniques, et pratiques d’animation. Nous encourageons les contributions examinant les interactions de l’animation dans les médias reliées à l’animation, telles les bandes dessinées et les jeux vidéos, étant donné que les mouvements queer se déploient fréquemment à travers plusieurs plateformes médiatiques (Hemmann, 2015). Nous invitions également les contributions d’œuvres artistiques provenant d’artistes queer, tout comme des œuvres portant sur le mouvement et l’existence queer. D’autres formes d’écritures en lien avec le mouvement animé à travers les médias queer sont bienvenues, tels l’entrevue, le manifeste, l’essai, ou encore les contributions multimédias.

Les sujets peuvent explorer, entres autres, les pistes suivantes :

  • Les structures professionnelles ou amateur.rice.s dans la production d’imagerie LGBTQ+
  • Le mouvement dans la pornographie et l’érotisme LGBTQ+
  • Le mouvement queer dans les bandes dessinées, romans graphiques, jeux vidéos, etc.
  • Les stratégies et la place des images queered (‘’Queer’’ média mix, commercialisation, festivals et
    conventions)
  • La production de média animé dans les Pays du Sud (telle la série Netflix brésilienne Super Drags)
  • Les plateformes de distribution pour les séries animées LGBTQ+ (télévision, internet, vidéo sur
    demande)
  • Les représentations LGBTQ+ dans les médias animés émergents du manga populaire (Boys’s Love,
    Yuri), au manga en marge (dénommé Bara or Gachimuchi)
  • Les communautés LGBTQ+ locales et leurs luttes mises en scènes à travers les images en
    mouvement
  • Le mouvement queer à travers les bandes dessinées et l’animation
  • Le cosplay en tant que (ré)animation queer

Nous utilisons une interprétation vaste de l’identité LGBTQ+, incluant l’identité lesbienne, bisexuelle, gay, trans*, queer/en questionnement, bispirituelle, intersexe, agender, pansexuelle, genderqueer, genderfluid, non-binaire, x-gender, genderfuck, etc.

Les soumissions pour la section avec comité de lecture doivent faire entre 5500 et 7500 mots et suivre les directives du Chicago Manual of Style (17e édition). Les images doivent être accompagnées d’une légende et de crédits photographiques. Nous accueillons également chaudement critiques et comptes rendus de conférences, festivals et expositions, et entrevues liées aux thèmes susdits. Les articles sans comité de lecture doivent faire au maximum 2500 mots, et inclure une bibliographie suivant les directives du Chicago Manual of Style (17e édition). Les éléments multimédias comme les vidéos, gifs, images ou autres (surprenez-nous!) sont aussi chaudement accueillis. Les éléments en deçà de 8MB peuvent être hébergés directement sur le site de Synoptique, tandis que ceux au-dessus de ce chiffre doivent être téléchargés sur un site externe (Youtube, Vimeo, etc.) Veuillez contacter l’équipe de Synoptique pour plus d’informations en regard aux procédures relatives aux soumissions d’œuvres artistiques.

Les contributions rédigées en français et en anglais sont acceptées.

Les articles et essais doivent être soumis au comité éditorial (editor.synoptique@gmail.com) par email aux rédacteurs invités, Kevin J. Cooley (kevin.cooley@ufl.edu), Edmond (Edo) Ernest dit Alban (ernestedo@gmail.com), et Jacqueline Ristola (jacqueline.ristola@gmail.com) avant le 30 avril. Nous vous informerons de notre décision avant le 30 juin.