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FILM-PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE

6-8 July 2020
At OCAD University, Toronto
Co-Hosted by OCAD University, Ryerson University, and York University
KEYNOTES:
Kara Keeling (University of Chicago) Brian Price (University of Toronto) two more TBA

We invite proposals for presentations on any subject related to film, media and philosophy for the Film-Philosophy Conference 2020 to be held at OCAD University and the TIFF-Bell Lightbox in Toronto. There is no overall theme or specialized topics for the conference. We will instead use a “track” system that provides a number of broad headings to which a presenter may wish to attach their submission. There is, of course, an Open track if you feel that your paper does not fit within any of the other tracks. The tracks for 2020 are (in alphabetic order):

• Affect and Emotion
• Aesthetics
• The Animal and the Non-Human
• Canadian Cinema
• Documentary and Essay Films
• Ecology
• Emergent Film-Philosophies
• Ethics
• Existentialism
• Expanded Cinema, Film Installation,
Video Art
• Film and Critical Race Theory
• Film-Philosophy Canon
• Film-Philosophy Pedagogy
• Gender and Feminism
• Indigeneity and Fourth Cinema
• New Materialism and Object-Oriented
Ontology
• New Media and Technologies
• Open
• Phenomenology
• Political Film-Philosophy
• Queer approaches to Film-Philosophy • Realism
• Religion, Secularism, Postsecularism • Workshops

We are only accepting individual proposals for presentations of 20 minutes.
We do not accept group proposals, except for Workshops. We are open to workshops that have alternative and innovative formats that provoke discussion and debate. If you have any ideas for a workshop – in format or content – please contact one of the conference directors before submitting an official abstract via the website.

We invite 300-word abstract proposals to be submitted by 31 January 2020. All abstracts will be considered by at least two members of the conference committee and decisions will be announced in March 2020.

Click here to submit a proposal for the 2020 Film-Philosophy Conference.

Please direct all enquiries regarding the conference to the conference e- mail: FPToronto2020@gmail.com

Individual conference organizers may be reached at:
John Caruana (jcaruana@ryerson.ca) Mark Cauchi (mcauchi@yorku.ca) Selmin Kara (selminkara@gmail.com)

 

From Annihilation to High Life:

Feminist Posthumanism and Postfeminist Humanism in

Contemporary Science Fiction Film

 

Joint panel of the Posthumanism Research Network and FSAC

Annual Meeting of the Film Studies Association of Canada(FSAC), June 02-04, 2020, University of Western Ontario, London (ON)

Organizers: Julia Empey (WLU) and Russell Kilbourn (WLU)

 

Deadline for submission of abstracts: January 06, 2020

 

 

In 2018 two films were released—Claire Denis’ High Life and Alex Garland’s Annihilation—representing two different poles of contemporary SF film narrative, and two different explorations of specific posthumanist (as well as transhumanist) themes. The two films are similar to the extent that they challenge the Enlightenment Humanist narrative that has dominated Western thought for the last four centuries. Annihilation and High Life can be conceived as two ends of a spectrum of contemporary SF cinema intimately invested in the debates around the posthuman and the critical posthumanities within a feminist critical-theoretical context. The decentring of the human at the core of posthumanist thought has its corollary—indeed, its typological anticipation—in feminism’s de-centring of ‘man.’ That neither of these transformations has entirely succeeded is a problem that informs the story in each of these films, albeit from entirely different perspectives, with a radically different audiovisual language in each case.

In Rosi Braidotti’s (2019) terms, we are now living “the posthuman predicament” resulting from the convergence of the ongoing critique of a Eurocentric Humanist philosophical legacy and the anthropocentric habits of representation it supports. According to Cecilia Åsberg (2018), critical posthumanism is in an important sense exemplified in feminist theory, “long critiquing the centrality of the figure of Man for its gender chauvinism.” Arguably, the (dis-)embodied female could be the ultimate posthuman subject. This panel seeks to place posthumanism and feminism in direct conversation as mediated through contemporary science fiction films. Both posthumanism and feminism aim to counter or dismantle a masculinist, patriarchist Enlightenment Humanism, and SF cinema has been putting these seemingly disparate schools of thought into dialogue for some time now. Where typically the mention of SF in the posthumanist context brings a whole set of (often clichéd) transhumanist tropes to mind—the cyborg, technologically augmented bodies, AI subjectivities, etc.—we encourage instead the submission of papers that either: (a) prioritize analyses of specific examples of contemporary SF cinema that engage in meaningful ways with the burgeoning field of critical posthumanism; or (b) utilize such films as case studies in the interrogation of posthumanist and feminist as well as humanistic ideas. In either case, papers grounded in formal film analysis are strongly encouraged.

 

 

Possible topics and films include, but are not limited to:

  • Feminist alterities
  • Posthuman ecologies
  • Posthuman subjectivities
  • Gender before and behind the camera in SF film
  • Futurism (both Italian and its newer incarnations) 
  • New materialism
  • Gendered cyborgs
  • Posthuman femininity/masculinity
  • Scarlett Johansson
  • Natalie Portman
  • Arrival (2016, Denis Villeneuve)
  • Blade Runner(1982, Ridley Scott)
  • Blade Runner 2049(2017, Denis Villeneuve)
  • Ex Machina(2014, Alex Garland)
  • Her(2013, Spike Jonze)
  • Lucy(2014, Luc Besson)
  • Metropolis(1928, Fritz Lang)
  • Under the Skin(2013, Jonathan Glazer)
  • Etc.

Authors are invited to submit a 500-word abstract for a paper of max. 20 minutes reading time as well as a 250-word biographical note. The deadline for submitting an abstract is Monday January 06, 2020.

Abstracts can be emailed to Julia Empey (empe3530@mylaurier.ca) and Russell Kilbourn (rkilbourn@wlu.ca).

Notification of acceptance will be sent by early February.

 

La version française ci-dessous

22nd Annual FSAC Graduate Colloquium
York University, Friday February 28 – Sunday March 1st, 2020
Call for papers: “Activity”

Keynote address by Dr. Brenda Longfellow, York University

Call for Papers: Activity

Cinema is an active agent: the mutual and reciprocal relationship between moving images and their spectators, the very act of making cinema, is a direct action. Packaged within this making is the action on the screen, the action of the technology capturing and then displaying the cinematic object, and the actions of the spectator. These activities extend well beyond screenings, into production, archiving, theorizing, and distributing; cinema is a collaborative, communal, multi-technological process of creation that spreads itself across vast networks of spectatorship, reception, distribution, imaginaries, and/or activisms. Such cases are woven into the medium’s history: from early Soviet montage articulating class struggle, to the Brechtian cinemas of the late French New Wave, to second wave feminist consciousness raising, and to contemporary practises in interactive documentary and new media, cinema has routinely been considered and used in service of a political modality. In 2020, cinema’s activities are global, streaming over the internet, and able to represent and shape the great forces of our current moment, including, but not limited to, climate catastrophe, mass migration, global civil war, economies of precarious labour, and the ongoing project of settler colonialism. These forces manifest simultaneously as hyper-local, ingrained in the communities their making emerges from, sites where both positive and negative consequences are most intimately felt.

The 22nd Annual FSAC Graduate Colloquium at York University coincides with the Cinema and Media Arts Department’s 50th anniversary. This department was built on a foundation of political praxis, in response to and continuation of this history of a cinema which is inherently political and active. It was in this spirit that in 1985 a collective of York University film professors—including Robin Wood, Andrew Britton, Scott Forsyth, among other notable scholars, critics, and filmmakers—founded CineAction, a self-described “magazine of radical film criticism and theory”. In her editorial contribution to CineAction’s final issue in 2016, co-founder Florence Jacobowitz conceives of the magazine’s approach to film criticism as a kind of political activity, recalling its founding “out of necessity, as a magazine that would publish politicized readings and where theory could be tested against critical practice (instead of simply imposed)”. Consequently, this year we ask for an engagement with the idea of activity and activism in film theory, history, and practise. How is cinema used as a tool of direct action? How does form foster political engagement?

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
Medium specificity and activism
Cinema and direct action
New media(s)
Documentary
Worldbuilding and futurisms—imaginations of the world as otherwise
Queer and trans cinemas
Research creation
Public and participatory art practices—artists intervening in the public sphere
Counterpublic spheres
Community media histories
Activist film festivals
Archival interventions
Media and pedagogy
The Anthropocene

Interested students should submit an abstract of no more than 300-500 words through the following form by Friday, January 3rd: https://forms.gle/P8ZKqFtw58Kz1yZV8

***

22e Colloque annuel de l’ACÉC pour les étudiant-e-s des cycles supérieurs
Université York, Vendredi, 28 février – Dimanche, 1er mars 2020
Appel à conférence : « Activité »

Conférence liminaire : Prof. Brenda Longfellow, Université York

Appel à communication : Activité

Le cinéma est un agent actif : la relation mutuelle et réciproque entre les images en mouvement et leurs spectateurs, l’acte de faire du cinéma, est une action directe. Dans toute cette création se retrouve l’activité que l’on retrouve à l’écran, l’activité derrière la technologie de captation, ainsi que la monstration de l’objet cinématographique, en plus des activités spectatorielles. Ces activités se prolongent bien au-delà de l’écran, dans la production, l’archivage, la théorisation et la distribution ; le cinéma est collaboratif, communal, un procédé de création pluritechnologique qui s’étend jusqu’aux vastes réseaux spectatoriels, de réception, de distribution, de l’imagination, et/ou d’activisme. De tels exemples se tissent dans l’histoire de ce médium : des débuts du montage de l’avant-garde soviétique qui traitaient de la lutte des classes, des théories brechtiennes associées à la nouvelle vague française, de la deuxième vague féministe et de la sensibilisation, jusqu’aux pratiques contemporaines dans le documentaire interactif et des nouveaux médias, le cinéma a toujours été systématiquement considéré et utilisé au service d’une modalité politique. En 2020, les activités cinématographiques sont mondiales, diffusées en continu sur Internet, tout en ayant la possibilité de représenter et de façonner les grandes forces du moment y compris, mais sans s’y limiter, la catastrophe environnementale, l’immigration massive, la guerre civile mondiale, l’économie des emplois précaires, ainsi que les colonies de peuplement actuelles. Ces influences se manifestent simultanément d’un point de vue hyperlocal, enracinées dans les communautés desquelles elles émergent, dont les conséquences, qu’elles soient positives ou négatives, sont intimement liées.

Le 22e Colloque annuel de l’ACÉC pour les étudiants des cycles supérieurs à l’Université York coïncide avec le 50e anniversaire de son département de cinéma et d’arts médiatiques. Ce département a été créé sur des bases de la praxis politique, en réponse et en prolongement de cette histoire d’un cinéma fondamentalement politique et actif. C’était dans cet esprit qu’en 1985, un collectif de professeurs en cinéma de l’Université York incluant Robin Wood, Andrew Britton, Scott Forsyth, avec d’autres spécialistes, critiques et cinéastes, a fondé CineAction, un magazine décrit comme traitant de la critique et de la théorie cinématographique radical. Dans sa contribution éditoriale pour l’ultime numéro de CineAction en 2016, la cofondatrice Florence Jacobowitz mentionne que l’approche envers la critique cinématographique a été conçue comme une sorte d’activité politique, se remémorant ces fondements comme une nécessité en tant que magazine qui publierait des textes politisés où la théorie pourrait être mise à l’épreuve contre la pratique analytique (au lieu de simplement l’imposer). Nous demandons donc, par conséquent, cette année de faire appel à un engagement avec cette idée de l’activité et de l’activisme associée avec la théorie du cinéma, l’histoire et la pratique. Comment le cinéma est-il utilisé en tant qu’outil d’une action directe ? Comment entretenir la promotion d’un engagement politique ?

Les propositions d’article peuvent aborder les sujets suivants, sans s’y limiter :
Spécificité et militantisme du médium
Cinéma et action directe
Nouveau(x) média(s)
Documentaire
Construction d’univers et futurisme – imagination d’autres mondes
Cinéma gai et transgenre
Recherche-création
Pratiques artistiques publiques ou participatives – artistes intervenant dans la sphère publique
Sphères contre-publiques
Histoire des médias communautaires
Festivals de films activistes
Interventions archivistiques
Média et pédagogie
L’Anthropocène

Les étudiant-e-s intéressé-e-s sont prié-e-s de faire parvenir une proposition comprenant entre 300 et 500 mots en suivant les instructions suivantes d’ici le vendredi 3 janvier 2020 : https://forms.gle/P8ZKqFtw58Kz1yZV8

 

Call for Proposals

The 2020 Carleton University Film Studies Graduate Student Colloquium will be held on Friday, March 6 and Saturday, March 7, 2020, in Ottawa. The organizing committee is excited to announce a call for proposals from students across Canada and studying at the graduate level in film and/or media studies. The conference is not strictly organized around an essential theme and as such we are seeking papers that encompass a broad number of topics within the discipline(s).

This colloquium is sponsored by the Film Studies program, located in the School for Studies in Art and Culture at Carleton University.

The colloquium’s keynote speaker is Susan Lord, a current professor in the Department of Film and Media at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She is interested in feminism, critical theory, and vulnerable media. Currently she is the Director of the Vulnerable Media Lab, and archival project that collects media from groups such as women and Indigenous peoples. Her Keynote Address will occur on the evening of March 6.

Please submit proposals of no more than 300-500 words, for a presentation of twenty minutes, on any topic in film and/or media studies. Include current or past university or institutional affiliation, degree level (MA or PhD), a brief description of research interests (no more than 50 words), and contact email address. Submit proposals, as an email attachment, in a Word document (or Word-compatible file), to:

carletonfilmgsc@gmail.com

The deadline for submissions is Monday, January 6, 2020.

We thank you for your submissions and look forward to your participation in this Colloquium.

Kind regards,

The 2020 Student Colloquium Organizing Committee

 

Source: Department of English, University of Saskatoon
Deadline: February 10, 2020

 

20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada is a three-day international conference to be held at the University of Saskatchewan in August 2020. The conference aims to gather together scholars, authors, and members of the public who are interested in speculative writing in Canada. Works of this genre have provocative implications that challenge conventional visions of reality by alluding to future possible worlds. Despite their focus on the future, speculative works comment on the present and the past. They ask readers to consider environmental, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. Speculative writing has proliferated in past decades, used by authors to represent and report on important societal concerns, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of environmental destruction and political conflict.

In the Canadian context, speculative writing has become a powerful tool to interrogate patriarchal-colonial enterprises. Marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference, use works of speculation to resignify a past marked by oppression, attest their identities, and create spaces of resistance and social change. The conference will invite a keynote speaker who can provoke discussion in these areas and help to strengthen the presence of diverse voices and emerging literary communities.

Speculative worlds have achieved popularity through media representations such as movies, television/internet series, and video games, some of which are adaptations of textual works. Conference organizers expect that participants will present their research on speculation in these media/genres as well as in published writings.

There will be space at the conference for writers of speculative genres to present their work to the public, at an open event on Thursday evening, and we hope to organize a workshop on aspects of speculative writing Saturday morning, for practitioners of the genre.

Following the conference, there will be a call for contributors to submit papers that expand on or respond to conference presentations and discussions, for publication in an essay collection. Featured in that collection will be an interview with the conference’s keynote practitioner of speculative writing. The collection will highlight the material accomplishment of the conference goals, which are to expand discussion and visibility of this literary genre, so significant for the contemporary era in which we live.

The conference is organized by members of the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan. The organizing committee includes faculty and graduate researchers of speculative fiction and practitioners based in our MFA in Writing graduate program. For more information see https://artsandscience.usask.ca/english/.

 

Call for Proposals

20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada

AUGUST 20-22, 2020
UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN, SASKATOON, CANADA

Speculative fiction, film, and television series are fast-growing genres, in part because they comment on the present. These genres ask readers to consider environmental, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. They are often used by their creators to represent, report, and speculate on key societal issues, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of environmental destruction and political conflict. In Canada, speculative writing has become a tool to interrogate colonial enterprises and open up spaces for marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference, to assert their identities and create avenues for resistance. A variety of speculative worlds have achieved popularity through films and television/internet series, some of which are literary adaptations. 20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada invites researchers and creators in the year 2020 to present their own speculations about the futures and/or societies that are presented in various texts produced in or relating to Canada. What do speculative texts tell us? Which visions of “Canada” do we find in speculative texts? How do these visions reflect our own perceptions of the world? Does this kind of literary imagination help us achieve social change? 

Proposals for both papers and panels are invited. These can take a range of approaches related to speculative writing in Canada, including: 

  • Dystopian worlds
  • Utopian and anti-utopian worlds
  • Apocalyptic scenarios
  • Post-apocalyptic futures
  • Feminist speculations
  • Indigenous speculations
  • Decolonizing speculations
  • Speculative writing for children
  • Speculative poetry
  • Climate change and/or technological developments
  • Animals in speculative writing
  • Speculations on language and power
  • Disability in speculative writing
  • Gender and sexuality in speculative writing
  • Speculation and interdisciplinarity
  • Speculations on the screen: movies, documentaries, television and internet series, video games
  • Speculative adaptations
  • Speculative creation, including the writing of speculative fiction* 

*The conference will also host sessions in which creators of speculative genres will be invited to present their works. Authors and artists are invited to propose 20-minute creative pieces; these may involve readings from written works, visual instalments, performance pieces, or film presentations. 

Paper proposals should include the following:

  1. Your name, contact information (including email address and telephone number), and institutional affiliation.
  2. The title of your proposed 20-minute paper or presentation, AND a proposal of 250-300 words, identifying the works that will be your focus of your paper and outlining the argument to be presented OR describing your creative piece and the method of presentation or performance.
  3. A 50-word biographical statement. 

Panel proposals should include the above information for all participants. 

Please e-mail your proposal in a Word document to conference organizers Wendy Roy and Mabiana Camargo of the University of Saskatchewan at 2020vision@usask.ca by February 10, 2020

Conference acceptances will be emailed in April, 2020. For further information, please visit the website or send an email to 2020vision@usask.ca

After the conference, there will be an open call for expanded papers to be published in a collection of essays on speculations in literature and on screen in Canada.

 

Conference Program

We are pleased to announce that the invited keynote speaker for 20/20 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada is Cherie Dimaline. She lives in Ontario and is a member of the Georgian Bay Métis Community. Her fifth novel, Empire of Wild, will be published soon, and she is currently working on the television adaptation of her 2017 bestselling novel The Marrow Thieves.​

The Marrow Thieves focuses on a young Indigenous protagonist and his created “family” in a near-future dystopian Canada. The novel won a Governor General’s Award (2017), Kirkus Prize for Young Readers (2017), Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic (2018), Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Young Adult Literature (2018), and Amy Mathers Teen Book Award (2018). The Marrow Thieves was also a finalist for the White Pine Award and Trillium Book Award in 2018; it was shortlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads contest and appeared as a Book of the Year in lists by publications such as the Globe and Mail newspaper and the School Library Journal.

Further details about the conference program will be posted in spring 2020.

 

Job Field: Tenure Stream 

Faculty / Division: Faculty of Arts and Science 

Department: Cinema Studies Institute 

Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto) 

Job Posting: Sep 19, 2019 

Job Closing: Nov 11, 2019, 11:59pm EST 


Description

The Cinema Studies Institute in the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto, St. George invites applications for a full-time, tenure stream position in the field of Canadian Cinemas, including North American Indigenous cinema and media. The position will be at the rank of Assistant Professor and will start on July 1, 2020, or shortly thereafter.

Candidates must have earned a PhD in Film Studies, Film and Media Studies, or a discipline related to the position as described by the date of appointment or shortly thereafter, and possess a demonstrated record of excellence in both teaching and research.

The successful candidate will be expected to teach in the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Cinema Studies Institute, in both required core courses and more specialized electives; to supervise and mentor students; to participate in affairs at the Institute; and to pursue outstanding, innovative and independent research at the highest international level while establishing a competitive, externally funded research program that will complement and expand our current research strengths. For more information on the Cinema Studies Institute, visit http://www.cinema.utoronto.ca/

 

We are seeking applicants with expertise in Canadian Cinemas, understood to include North American Indigenous cinema and media. Areas of specialization may encompass the history, historiography, and theory of various forms and traditions of Canadian cinemas, including, but not restricted to, documentary, animation, experimental, or narrative modes in anglophone, francophone, diasporic, or indigenous contexts. We also welcome applicants who study cinema and media cultures within Canada, including collaborative practices, co-productions, minoritarian practices, exhibition and reception, film festivals, and non-theatrical uses. Critical engagement with regional, national, and transnational approaches is expected to inform the research projects of those who apply. Interdisciplinary approaches, methodologies, and ways of knowing will also be appreciated. 

 

Excellence in research must be demonstrated through the quality of the writing sample submitted as part of the application, a record of publications or forthcoming publications in top-ranked and field-relevant academic journals, a record of presentations at significant conferences, awards and accolades, the submitted research statement and evidence of an innovative research program, as well as  strong endorsements by referees of high standing. 

 

Excellence in teaching must be demonstrated through a record of teaching accomplishments, strong letters of reference, and a teaching dossier including a statement of teaching philosophy, sample course syllabi, and teaching evaluations, submitted as part of the application.

 

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. 

 

The University of Toronto is one of the world’s top research-intensive universities and, with its multicultural student body and cosmopolitan setting, it offers the opportunity to teach, conduct research, and live in one of the world’s most diverse and dynamic cities.

All qualified candidates are invited to apply by clicking on the link below. Application materials must include a cover letter, a curriculum vita, a statement outlining current and future research interests, a writing sample of no more than 10,000 words, and a teaching dossier (consisting of a statement of teaching philosophy, sample syllabi, and teaching evaluations).  

 

Applicants must also arrange to have at least three external referees send letters of recommendation (signed and on institutional letterhead) directly to the Institute via email to Denise Ing, Assistant to the Director, at cinema.studies@utoronto.ca.

 

All application materials and reference letters must be received by the closing date of November 11, 2019. Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply. We recommend combining attached documents into one or two files in PDF format. If you have questions about this position, please contact Denise Ing at cinema.studies@utoronto.ca.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons/persons of colour, women, Indigenous/Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. 

As part of your application, you will be asked to complete a brief Diversity Survey. This survey is voluntary. Any information directly related to you is confidential and cannot be accessed by search committees or human resources staff. Results will be aggregated for institutional planning purposes. For more information, please see http://uoft.me/UP.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

 

Source: Careers at U of T : Assistant Professor – Canadian Cinema  1903750

 

MEL HOPPENHEIM SCHOOL OF CINEMA

FACULTY OF FINE ARTS, CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

Canada Research Chair in Media and Migration – Film Studies

Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, invites applications for an Emerging (Tier 2) Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Media and Migration within the Film Studies area (which houses the Film and Moving Image Studies doctoral program). The goal of the CRC program is to ensure that Canadian universities “achieve the highest levels of research excellence to become world-class research centres in the global, knowledge-based economy.”

We are seeking an emerging Canadian or international scholar demonstrating promising and innovative investigations into the relation between transnational, migratory and diasporic movements and the media forms and infrastructures in their contemporary or historical dimensions, broadly defined.  Candidates eligible for Tier II chair positions must be exceptional emerging scholars within 10 years of their highest degree at the time of nomination (exclusive of career interruptions). Candidates are encouraged to share any career interruptions or personal circumstances that may have had an impact on their career goals, such as the decision to have a family, eldercare, illness, and so forth, in their letter of application. Please consult the Canada Research Chairs website for full program information, including further details on eligibility criteria.

Possible areas of specialization may include (but are not limited to): the technological, aesthetic, social and cultural dynamics of moving images across media and in global circulation; artistic, experimental, and other oppositional media practices that respond to and represent the intensification of migratory trends (both forced and voluntary); the multiplicity of narratives of migration and ideas about the migrant represented in film and media; labor migration and border-crossing within film and media industries; the entanglements between border regimes and media technologies of surveillance, tracking, and control; relationships between media infrastructures, structures of distribution, and diasporic formations; the mediation of migration patterns beyond South-North vectors; analyses of the shifting terrains of postcolonial and postsocialist spaces and infrastructures, the movement across them, and their articulations in and through media.

Attention to how questions of gender, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, sexuality, religion, class, dis/ability or language intersect with and frame both the patterns and predicaments of movement and the genres of mediation outlined above are strongly encouraged. Accordingly, we particularly encourage applications from underrepresented and minoritized scholars.

The successful candidate will have an important record of innovative or diverse research and publication (or, in the case of a junior scholar, show the promise for such a record with at least one peer-reviewed publication) and have demonstrated an ability to foster collaborative initiatives in or outside the university, secure appropriate funding, and mentor a diverse body of students. The candidate will also be expected to take a leadership role in continuing to build and expand the research culture of the department and university and its graduate programs, and this with an eye to the multiplicity of forms of media and migration around the globe.

The successful candidate for the CRC in Media and Migration, who will have obligatorily defended their PhD by June 30, 2020, will be appointed to the School of Cinema at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor and will be expected to possess expertise in Film Studies with a view of also teaching existing courses in the unit’s curricula. The candidate will work with the Faculty of Fine Arts to prepare the formal CRC application according to CRC program guidelines. The university will nominate the successful candidate to the CRC Secretariat at the earliest opportunity according to the guidelines of the CRC program.

Concordia is located in one of North America’s most diverse, creative and livable cities. The Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema – Canada’s largest university-based centre for the study of film animation, film production and film studies – has an international reputation that continues to provide a benchmark for innovation and quality. The School of Cinema’s Film Studies programs are in great demand as a highly interdisciplinary domain of study situated within the globalization of culture, knowledge and technology. A young PhD program, as well as a vibrant MA in Film Studies, provide a rich context for advanced, critical study of the moving image, as well as for innovative and sustainable research programs in a variety of areas crucial to the rapidly changing field of film study.

Submissions must include a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, copies of recent publications, a one-page research statement, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and three letters of recommendation. Candidates should address in their cover letter how their research and/or experience contribute to equity, diversity or inclusion.

A detailed five-year research plan, appropriate to the goals and objectives of the CRC program, will be required of all long-listed candidates, who will be contacted at the end of October.  Short-listed candidates will be invited for campus interviews in late November or early December.

 

Applications should be submitted or postmarked on or before September 15, 2019to:

 

Mailing and courier address:
Dr. Masha Salazkina 
Re: Canada Research Chair in Media and Migration – Film Studies
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University
1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. West, S-FB 319
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1M8
Fax: 514-848-4255

 

Civic address for in-person delivery:
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema
Faubourg (FB) Tower
Sir George Williams Campus
1250 Guy Street, S-FB 319
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3H 2T4

 

Electronic submissions:
FILMSTUD@algol.concordia.ca

 

All inquiries regarding this position should be directed to:
Dr Masha Salazkina, Search Committee Chair

Email:masha.salazkina@concordia.ca

 

For further information, applicants are encouraged to consult:
Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema: http://cinema.concordia.ca
Faculty of Fine Arts: http://finearts.concordia.ca
Academic Services for Fine Arts faculty:
http://finearts.concordia.ca/officeofthedean/servicesandresourcesforfaculty

 

This position, linked to the CRC appointment, will begin July 1, 2020. Review of applications will begin immediately after the application deadline, and will continue until the position is filled.

 

Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Nadia Hardy, Vice-Provost, Faculty Development and Inclusion at vpfdi@concordia.ca or by phone at 514.848.2424 extension 4323.

 

 

 

Fellini, Italy, CinemaInternational Conference on the Centenary of Federico Fellini’s Birth (1920-2020)

In the centenary of his birth, the Department of Italian Studies and the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto,and the Dipartimento di Storia, Antropologia, Religioni, Arte,Spettacolo of Sapienza Università di Roma La Sapienza are delighted to announce a joint conference on the work and legacy of late Italian film master Federico Fellini (1920-2020).

A number of volumes of recent publication have returned to Fellini’s cinema and assessed it from a variety of novel vantage points, testing its resilience against the latest contributions in critical theory and making a compelling case for the need of its reevaluation. For instance, in his Political Fellini: Journey to the End of Italy(Berghahn 2018), Andrea Minuz argues that, contrary to popular belief, the film auteur was not an aloof dreamer, but an artist who was profoundly immersed in his cultural milieu, pondering the questions of his time and responding to it with an honesty that was uncommon, often disarming, and certainly problematic. If Minuz focuses on secular institutions, Alessandro Carrera turns to religion in his Fellini’s Eternal Rome: Paganism and Christianity in the Films of Federico Fellini (Bloomsbury 2018), exploring the uneasy melange of paganism and Christianity in the works of the director, underscoring how life-affirming Franciscanism and repressive Counter-Reformation dogmatism co-exist and clash throughout Fellini’s catalogue. Ottavio Ciro Zanetti’s Tre passi nel genio: Fellini tra fumetto, circo e varietà(Marsilio 2018) focuses on Fellini’s interest in cinema’s sister visual and performing popular arts, of which the director was a both an early practitioner and a lifelong admirer. Moreover, books devoted Fellini’s films still appear in print with regular cadence, from Roberto Chiesi’s monograph 8 ½ di Federico Fellini(Gremese 2018) to Rosita Copioli and Gérard Morin’s edited collection Il Casanova di Fellini: ieri e oggi 1976-2016(Gangemi 2018). As this cursory look at the small sample of 2018 publications illustrates, the academic community is still actively engaged with Fellini’s work, continuing to produce a plethora of interventions aimed at refining at updating the already vast bibliography on the Italian master.

 

This joint bilingual conference seeks papers that (re)assess Fellini’s career and the legacy of his work, examining the complex network of (mediated) significations produced by his artistic collaborations and his personal relationships. Our ultimate goal is to evaluate the present state of Fellininan studies and perhaps anticipate their future developments on both sides of the Atlantic and across scholarly traditions. This event is articulated in two sessions: the first one, hosted by the Università di RomaLa Sapienza, will convene in the Spring of 2020 (25-26 May); the second, at the University of Toronto, will resume the conversation in the Fall of the same year (16-17 October). Confirmed keynote speakers: in Rome, for the Rome session are Stephen Gundle (University of Warwick); Frank Burke (Queen’s University, Emeritus) and Atom Egoyan (Filmmaker) will deliver the address in Toronto. The resulting proceedings will be published by Franco Cesati Editore as part of the Goggio Chair series in Italian Studies.

 

Various avenues of inquiry are welcome, including but not limited to:

 

  • Critical Reception, Film Theory, Film Analysis, Production Studies
  • Case Studies in Distribution and Circulation
  • Interdisciplinarity (Music, Visual Arts, Multi-and-transmedia projects)
  • Screenwriting, Literature, Language
  • History, Fascism, Italian Modernity
  • Architecture and Urbanism
  • Biopolitics and Ecocinema
  • Gender and Sexuality

 

Please submit proposals (250 words max) accompanied by a short bio (150 words max) to FedericoFellini2020@gmail.com by 1 September 2019, indicating for which session (Rome, Toronto, or both) you wish to be considered. Proposals should include a title and up to five keywords. For information about panel topics, assistance with proposals, and other questions about the conference program, please contact the organizing committee. We welcome the presentation or performance of creative works or artifacts. Proposals will be evaluated and selected based on their fit and scientific promise. Participants will be notified by 1 November 2019.

 

Organizing Committee

Andrea Minuz, Università di Roma La Sapienza

Emiliano Morreale, Università di Roma La Sapienza

Jessica Whitehead, University of Toronto

Alberto Zambenedetti, University of Toronto

 

Scientific Committee

Marco Bertozzi (IUAV – Venezia)

Frank Burke (Queen’s University – Emeritus)

Angela Dalle Vacche (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Manuela Gieri (Università della Basilicata)

Stephen Gundle (University of Warwick)

Gaetano Lettieri (Università di Roma La Sapienza)

Emiliano Morreale (Università di Roma La Sapienza)

Federico Pacchioni (Chapman University)

Veronica Pravadelli (Università Roma Tre)

Jaqueline Reich (Fordham University)

Luca Somigli (University of Toronto)

Vito Zagarrio (Università Roma Tre)

 


 

CFP: Italiano

 

Fellini, l’Italia, il cinema.

Convegno Internazionale Per Il Centenario della Nascita di Federico Fellini

(1920-2020)

 

In occasione del centenario della nascita di Federico Fellini (1920-2020), il Department of Italian Studies, il Cinema Studies Institute della University of Toronto, e il Dipartimento di Storia, Antropologia, Religioni, Arte, Spettacolo dell’Università di Roma La Sapienza sono lieti di annunciare un convegno congiunto per invitare gli studiosi a riflettere sull’eredità, le connessioni interdisciplinari e le nuove prospettive di ricerca e interpretazione del cinema di Fellini.

 

Vari studi di recente pubblicazione hanno riesaminato il cinema di Fellini da molteplici punti di vista, alla luce delle teorie e delle prospettive critiche più recenti, indicando in vari modi la necessità di una profonda rilettura di quest’opera. Ad esempio, in Viaggio al termine dell’Italia. Fellini politico(Rubbettino, 2012), Andrea Minuz sostiene che, contrariamente a quanto si è sempre creduto, Fellini non fosse solo un “sognatore distratto” e un “visionario”, ma un artista profondamente immerso nel suo milieu culturale, attento alle questioni culturali e anche politiche dell’Italia in cui è vissuto, alle quali rispondeva con un’onestà a volte disarmante ma certamente problematica. Se Minuz si concentra sulle istituzioni laiche e sul rapporto con la società italiana e la politica, Alessandro Carrera mette in luce invece la complessità della dimensione religiosa: il suo studio, Fellini’s Eternal Rome: Paganism and Christianity in the Films of Federico Fellini (Bloomsbury, 2018), esplora lo scomodo melange di paganesimo e cristianità nell’opera del regista, sottolineando come coesistano in Fellini la vitalità del francescanesimo e il dogmatismo della controriforma. Tre passi nel genio: Fellini tra fumetto, circo e varietà (Marsilio 2018) di Ottavio Ciro Zanetti è invece dedicato all’interesse di Fellini per le arti figurative e performative, in cui il regista si è cimentato all’inizio della sua carriera e di cui, com’è noto, è sempre stato un grande ammiratore. D’altro canto, volumi sul cinema di Fellini continuano a uscire con regolare cadenza, dalla monografia di Roberto Chiesi 8 ½ di Federico Fellini(Gremese 2018) alla curatela di Rosita Copioli e Gérard Morin intitolata Il Casanova di Fellini: ieri e oggi 1976-2016 (Gangemi 2018). La comunità accademica continua pertanto a interessarsi all’opera di Fellini, producendosi in una varietà di interventi che perfezionano e aggiornano la vasta bibliografia già esistente dedicata al maestro.

 

  Questo convegno congiunto (e bilingue) intende quindi dare spazio a proposte costruire nell’orizzonte di una rilettura del cinema di Fellini, esaminandone il sistema di rimandi e di significazioni (mediate) prodotte sia dalle collaborazioni artistiche che dalle relazioni personali e culturali. Gli incontri si propongono così da un lato di fare il punto sullo stato attuale degli studi felliniani, e dall’altro di immaginare sviluppi futuri all’interno delle tradizioni accademiche europee e nordamericane. Gli incontri si svolgeranno in due sessioni: l’Università di Roma La Sapienza ospiterà la prima parte nella primavera del 2020 (25-26 maggio), mentre la University of Toronto chiuderà i lavori nell’autunno dello stesso anno (16-17 ottobre). I keynote che hanno già confermato la loro presenza sono: Stephen Gundle (University of Warwick) a Roma; Frank Burke (Queen’s University, Emeritus) e il regista Atom Egoyan (filmmaker) a Toronto. Gli atti di entrambe le sessioni verranno raccolti in un volume pubblicato da Franco Cesati Editore nella collana Goggio Chair in Italian Studies.

 

Si invitano contributi di ampio respiro tematico, fra cui si segnalano i seguenti possibili approcci:

  • Teoria del cinema e analisi del film
  • Studi sulla produzione, la ricezione e la circolazione internazionale dell’opera di Fellini a partire da singoli case study
  • Interdisciplinarità (musica, arti figurative, progetti multi-e-trans-mediali)
  • Sceneggiatura, letteratura, rapporti tra Fellini e gli scrittori
  • Storia italiana, Fascismo, modernità e modernizzazione
  • Architettura e urbanistica
  • Biopolitica e ecocinema
  • Studi di genere e sessualità

 

Gli interessati a presentare una relazione dovranno inviare un abstract (250 parole max) corredato da una breve nota biografica, (150 parole max) all’indirizzo FedericoFellini2020@gmail.comentro il primo settembre 2019, indicando chiaramente a quale sessione (Roma, Toronto, o entrambi) desiderano partecipate. Le proposte devono includere un titolo e fino a cinque parole chiave. Per informazioni su possibili argomenti, assistenza con le proposte, e altre domande riguardo al programma del convegno, si prega di contattare gli organizzatori. Si sollecitano inoltre proposte di lavori creativi e artefatti. La selezione delle proposte si effettuerà in base alla qualità scientifica e alla pertinenza. L’esito sarà comunicato entro il primo novembre 2019.

 

Comitato Organizzativo

Andrea Minuz, Università di Roma La Sapienza

Emiliano Morreale, Università di Roma La Sapienza

Jessica Whitehead, University of Toronto

Alberto Zambenedetti, University of Toronto

 

Comitato Scientifico

Marco Bertozzi (IUAV – Venezia)

Frank Burke (Queen’s University – Emeritus)

Angela Dalle Vacche (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Manuela Gieri (Università della Basilicata)

Stephen Gundle (University of Warwick)

Gaetano Lettieri (Università di Roma La Sapienza)

Emiliano Morreale (Università di Roma La Sapienza)

Federico Pacchioni (Chapman University)

Veronica Pravadelli (Università Roma Tre)

Jaqueline Reich (Fordham University)

Luca Somigli (University of Toronto)

Vito Zagarrio (Università Roma Tre)

 

 

 

Graduate students, unwaged and sessional instructors wishing to be reimbursed for travel fees to the 2019 FSAC Annual General Meeting are required to fill out the 2019 FSAC Travel Expense Reimbursement Form and send their receipts to treasurer Mike Meneghetti by email before June 30, 2019. For more information and answers to common questions, please see the FAQ below.

Les membres étudiants, chargés de cours et travailleurs précaires de l’ACÉC souhaitant se faire rembourser une partie des frais de déplacement à l’AGA doivent remplir le formulaire de remboursement de frais de déplacement et envoyer leurs reçus à la trésorière Mike Meneghetti par courriel avant le 30 juin 2019. Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez consulter la FAQ ci-bas.

 


FAQ

If I couldn’t attend the AGM can I still apply for travel reimbursement if I attended the conference?
NO. The grant is explicitly to fund travel to the AGM.

Can I include receipts for accommodation, conference fees, meals, etc.?
NO. 
The grant is explicitly to fund travel only to the AGM.

Can I include all travel receipts to the AGM site including ground transportation such as buses and taxis to and from the airport?
NO. Priority is given to reimbursing you for your primary means of travel (flight, or long-distance bus or train) to the AGM. Additional travel to/from the airport, train station, etc. will not be funded.

How much will I receive?
DEPENDS. There is a limited pool of funding and all eligible applications will receive funding, but how much depends on the number of requests.
In the past few years, requests have exceeded the funding and applicants have received a portion of their travel costs reimbursed.

Is the funding competitive?
NO. Everyone who is eligible will receive funding with priority given to students.

I’m tenured faculty. Can I apply?
YES. However, you will only be reimbursed if there is funding remaining after all student requests have been reimbursed first. (In past years, there have been no remaining funds after all the student requests are filled).

What kind of receipts do you require?
Electronic tickets are fine. Boarding passes if they have the ticket amount. Any bus or train ticket stub that indicates the cost of the ticket is acceptable. You should keep a copy of all travel receipts submitted.

Can I still get reimbursed if I drove?
Yes. However, we don’t count mileage. Send in the gas receipt(s) for the date you departed and the day of your return trip.

All other inquiries please email Mike Meneghetti


La Foire aux questions

Si je n’ai pu assister à l’AGA, puis-je déposer une demande de remboursement de frais de déplacement si, par contre, j’ai assisté au Congrès?
NON. La bourse s’applique explicitement au remboursement de frais de déplacement liés à l’AGA.

Puis-je inclure des reçus pour l’hébergement, les frais de congrès, les repas, etc.?
NON. 
La bourse s’applique explicitement et uniquement au remboursement de frais de déplacement liés à l’AGA.

Puis-je inclure tous les reçus de déplacement vers le site de l’AGA, y compris le transport terrestre, par exemple les bus et les taxis aller-retour de l’aéroport?
NON. La priorité est accordée au remboursement de vos moyens de transport principaux (vol, bus ou train de grand parcours) à l’AGA. Le transport additionnel (aller-retour à l’aéroport, la gare, etc.) ne sera pas remboursé.

Combien vais-je recevoir?
ÇA DÉPEND. Les fonds sont limités et toutes les demandes admissibles recevront un remboursement, mais la somme dépend du nombre de demandes. Au cours des dernières années, les demandes ont dépassé les fonds et les demandeurs ont été remboursés en partie pour leurs frais de déplacement.

Le remboursement se fait-il sur une base de concours?
NON. Quiconque est admissible recevra un remboursement et les étudiant(e)s seront remboursé(e)s en priorité.

Je suis professeur titulaire. Puis-je faire une demande?
OUI. Toutefois, on ne vous remboursera que s’il reste des fonds une fois que toutes les demandes étudiantes auront été remboursées. Au cours des dernières années, aucun fonds n’est resté après le remboursement aux étudiant(e)s.

Quel type de reçu exigez-vous?
Les billets électroniques sont acceptés. Les cartes d’embarquement le sont également si le prix du billet y est inscrit. Tout coupon de bus ou de train qui indique le coût du billet est accepté. Vous devriez conserver une copie de tous les reçus de déplacement soumis.

Puis-je être remboursé(e) si je suis venu(e) avec mon auto?
OUI. Toutefois, nous ne tenons pas compte du kilométrage. Prière de nous envoyer le ou les reçus d’essence pour la date de votre départ et celle de votre retour.

Pour toute autre question, envoyez un courriel à Mike Meneghetti

 

Call For Proposals: The (re)Making of a Movement: New Perspectives on the 1960s Counterculture

Abstract Submission: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals
Contact: daniel.hambly@humber.ca, jennifer.marotta@humber.ca
Submission Deadline: May 30, 2019
Conference Date: October 26-27, 2019
Location: Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens’ Quay West, Toronto, Canada.
Host: Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Innovative Learning (FLA), Humber
College and the Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA)

Keynote Speaker:

Angela Davis
Activist, Author, Educator, and Scholar
 

It’s been 50 years since 400,000 people descended on Bethel, New York, for an event that became one of the most important cultural touchstones for a generation: Woodstock. As participants in an amorphous social movement the Woodstock Generation came to be defined in opposition to previous generations. Despite growing up in an era of incredible privilege, widespread government social programs, post-war housing and education, and increasing affluence, they rejected, or attempted to redefine traditional values. In theory, supporters of the counterculture rejected individualism, competition, and capitalism. Rejection of monogamy and the traditional nuclear family gave way to a communal ideal—disavowing individualism and private property in favour of shared food, work, sex. As historian Michael Doyle points out, the myth of Woodstock holds that “in a time of military conflict abroad, racial and ethnic strife at home, when a deep social division known as the ‘generation gap’ separated parents from children, nearly half a million young people removed themselves from proximity to these conflicts and went ‘back to the garden’ to try to ‘set their souls free’.” As such, Woodstock carries a certain symbolic weight for participants in the 1960s and 1970s counterculture movement and for anyone who looks back on the past fifty years with a critical eye.

The counterculture movement encompassed: the Civil Rights Movement, Free Speech, the New Left, Anti-war, Anti-nuclear, Feminism, Free school movement, Drug Culture, Environmentalism, Student Activism, Producerism, Gay liberation, the Sexual Revolution, and the rise of Hippies to innovations in fashion, music, film, and literature. The American poet John Perry Barlow once said: “I started out as a teenage beatnik and then became a hippie and then became a cyberpunk. And now I’m still a member of the counterculture, but I don’t know what to call that.” How have the various movements within the counterculture evolved over the past 50 years? What did hippies become? Who was the Sexual Revolution scripted for? How did the Civil Rights movement evolve? How did a generation that “dropped out” re-engage? How was this fringe culture appropriated by marketers? How challenging was it to live an ideal especially in light of the Cold War and rise of Reaganism?

Our conference committee welcomes individual presentation proposals of 300 words, and panel proposals (3 people max) of 900 words, based on any of the above themes.

This will be the sixth annual interdisciplinary conference held by Humber College’s Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Innovative Learning (FLA) of Toronto in association with the Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA), one of the most celebrated literary festivals in the world. It is located at the Harbourfront Centre, one of downtown Toronto’s major cultural and artistic venues.

Submit your proposal online: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals