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What is the Witch Institute?

In the last few years, the witch has re-emerged as a powerful political symbol. Across cinemas and television, in books and podcasts, and via hashtag activism, the proliferation of the witch in media signals a critique of the existing world order and its reliance on the subjugation of marginalized peoples. In order to better understand the meaning and impact of current media representations of the witch, we will hold an expanded conversation between activists, artists, filmmakers, curators, historians, scholars, witches, feminists, healers, and more.

The Witch Institute is a collaborative meeting space for those who are interested in responding to contemporary imaginings of the witch in popular and visual culture. It is a place to share diverse understandings of witches and witchcraft, and to complicate, reframe, and remediate media representations that often continue to perpetuate colonial, misogynistic, and Eurocentric stereotypes of the archetypal figure. 

The Witch Institute will present a keynote lecture by Dr. Silvia Federici, along with a series of talks, panel discussions, film screenings, art exhibitions, performances, and workshops occurring over August 16 to 22, 2021. All events will be free, open to the public, and accessible online. Registration opens January 25, 2021.

 

Call for Proposals:

We are seeking round table participants and workshop leaders. We invite proposals from artists, researchers, and practitioners. We encourage a diversity of voices as part of this exchange, and highly encourage submissions from members of marginalized communities, including BIPOC and 2SLBGTQ participants.

Round Tables. We are looking for participants who wish to discuss their research with a group. Each session will include 3-4 artists, researchers, or practitioners. Attendees will read short texts (maximum 5-pages in length) or review documentation of panelists’ work in advance. The sessions will be devoted to 75-minute moderated discussions. 

Workshops. We are seeking proposals for 60-minute interactive virtual sessions. 

We invite proposals that contribute to topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. Witchcraft and Colonization: colonial denigration and erasure of Black or Indigenous spiritual knowledges and practices; reclamation of Black or Indigenous spiritual knowledges, practices, and more-than-human relationalities as anti-colonial resistance or as decolonial projects; cultural evolutions, exchanges, and appropriations among historical and contemporary witch practices. 
  2. Witch Hunts and the State: on-going witch hunts and their interconnected histories of colonization and globalization; witch-hunting as state-sanctioned violence; enforcement of anti-witchcraft legislation in colonial, postcolonial, and settler-colonial nation-states. 
  3. Technology and Magic: traditions of magic, alternative healing practices, and/or spirituality as technology; visual effects, illusions, and magic on screen and stage; technological mediation and the supernatural; technology and the senses; the body and other mediums for spiritual messages.
  4. Witchcraft as Ritual, Practice, and Pedagogy: ritual as a form of learning-by-doing; oral traditions and decolonial practices of knowledge transmission; pedagogical uses of the witch, witchcraft, and/or ritual practices; the perspectives of contemporary practitioners; religious lineages of Wicca and Paganism; intergenerational exchange, kinship, more-than-human relations, and covens; the relationship between witchcraft and feminism.
  5. The Witch as Text: representations of the witch, witchcraft, and spiritual practices in literature, film, music, fashion, art, and popular culture; the commodification of the witch; texts as restoring, or healing the denigration of colonization; shifting perceptions, receptions, and circulations of witchcraft in the context of colonization and globalization.

 

Submissions:

Those interested in participating in the round table or organizing a workshop, please submit:

  • a 250 word abstract of your research or description of your workshop 
  • which of the above topic(s) you see your work fitting into (if applicable)
  • for roundtable submissions: 2 or 3 questions you would like to discuss with a group who will read your paper/look at your artwork in advance;
  • a 150 word bio. 

 

Submissions should be sent to witch.institute@queensu.ca by January 25, 2021.

 

The Witch Institute is committed to accessibility in all phases of the project. If you have any questions or needs concerning this call, please feel free to send Emily Pelstring (she/her) an email at emily.pelstring@queensu.ca.

 

This project has received SSHRC funding. 

 

Call for Papers:

Reframing the Nation: Diasporic Racialized, Indigenous & Queer BIPOC Canadian Independent Women Filmmakers 1990-2020.

 

Reframing the Nation is the first critical film anthology from an intersectional Canadian context that is dedicated to a close engagement with impactful films produced by racialized diasporic, indigenous, and Queer BIPOC independent women filmmakers in Canada. This collection charts the cinematic visions and perspectives of first and second generation diasporic and indigenous filmmakers and Queer BIack, Indigenous, Women of Colour Canadian Independent Women Filmmakers working from 1990-2020. Works considered can be shorts or features that are independent Canadian productions.

Independent films tend to reflect artistic practices that are rooted in personal, political, aesthetic, cultural, philosophical, and social justice concerns, they are typically arts council funded and/or co-produced with other agencies. A central component of independent film is that the filmmaker maintains artistic/editorial control over their work. Comparative papers between Canadian productions and international productions are welcome.

 

Please Submit Abstracts (300 words) & short bios (125 words) by January 15, 2021
Notification of acceptance: February 16, 2021
Submission of Papers: 12-15 pages preferred, to a maximum of 5,000 words.
Final Draft Due: September 20, 2021
Please direct all inquiries to: diasporicbiwoc@gmail.com (will answer any questions before the abstract deadline)

 

Submissions may consider the following: 

 

  • Documentary and Narrative features, short films, hybrid films or activist documentaries with thoughtful approaches. Oppositional and Fringe works also welcome.
  • Cultural identities and diasporic aesthetics: the merging of aesthetics and politics; to explore geographies of space/place, fragmented uprooted identities, home and belonging, intersectional identities, politics of displacement, memory and history, contesting dominant narratives of Canada as a nation etc.
  • Analyses of intersectional representations of social justice issues or settler nation.
  • Theorizing and analyzing diasporic works by Canadian racialized women or queer/trans women of colour, black and indigenous women filmmakers from decolonial, post-colonial, queer diasporic or transnational contexts.
  • Thematic or textual analysis of feature films or (body of short films) by a sole or multiple BIPOC women filmmakers.
  • Aesthetic/formal approaches in documentary, narrative, experimental, and hybrid films
  • Historiography of film/video by BIPOC women filmmakers in Canada (1990-2020)
  • Festivals & Distributors: supporting works by Indigenous women filmmakers & women of colour filmmakers in Canada.
  • Reception/audience studies of works produced by Indigenous/women of colour in Canada.
  • The decolonial use of technologies (digital and film) in works by Canadian racialized/queer diasporic and Indigenous women filmmakers.
  • Queer & Transgender films by Indigenous and women of colour filmmakers in Canada.
 

La version française ci-dessous

23rd Annual Film Studies Association of Canada Graduate Colloquium University of Toronto Cinema Studies Institute
Friday January 29 – Saturday January 30, 2021 (Virtual)
Call for papers: “SPECTRE”

Keynote address by Dr. David Marriott, Penn State University

The year 2020 has been shrouded by the spectre of crises, from the novel coronavirus, to ongoing racial injustice and colonial violence. The impact of this year has sent reverberations through the ways in which we gather, research, think, make and consume art, and indeed, how we survive. The spectral seems to be an apt mode for contemplating the conditions that hover over our times, and that continue to haunt the cinema and its study.

Film scholars have long tracked the ghostliness of the cinematic. For example, Katherine Groo asks us to consider the absence and decay of film and its celluloid im/materiality as a part of its ontology. In Zoological Surrealism, James Cahill attests to the power of film to reanimate the dead, while Canadian scholar Andrew Burke’s recent work looks at how contemporary Canadian film is haunted by traces of the 1970s. The onscreen body, too, persists as a phantasmagoric figure. For Maggie Hennefeld, the spectral encapsulates the transfiguring, miniaturising embodiment of early film comediennes, while Eliza Steinbock calls upon the “shimmer” to envision the illusory, astonishing visibility of both cinema and transgender embodiment. Cinema’s legacy of racial imagery also continues to haunt its image-making practices; in Black Skin, White Masks, Frantz Fanon famously wrote: “I can’t go to the movies without encountering myself. I wait for myself. Just before the film starts, I wait for myself,” a passage taken up by Kara Keeling in her article “In the Interval.” The spectre of film’s racial imaginary also cannot be separated from the continued presence of systemic anti-Black violence, a spectre that is all too real.

Finally, since Derrida conceptualized the neologism “hauntology” in his 1993 Spectres of Marx, many scholars, like those aforementioned and beyond the discipline of media studies, have engaged with spectres. Indeed, this conference also asks, in what ways are we haunted by the spectre of spectre? How is the spectral contained and rendered by filmic practices, or by film’s ontology? How does the spectral inhabit onscreen bodies and map across visions of marginalisation, terror, and violence? What is the cinema continuously haunted by, and how does this haunting rear its head?

Sample topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The paranormal and ghostliness
  • Systemic violence/legacies of violence
  • Im/materiality, un/reality, absence/presence
  • Dis/embodiment
  • Repetition and temporality
  • Memory, trauma, loss, fear, anxiety
  • Surface
  • Derrida/hauntology
  • Legacies of film history and historic film scholarship/methods

Submissions:
Interested graduate students must submit a brief abstract (300 to 500 words) as a .PDF file, in English or French, by Monday, December 7th, 2020, to: 
csgraduatestudentunion@gmail.com.

Submissions should include the following information:

  • Your name
  • Level of study
  • Name of your University
  • Title of your presentation
  • Abstract
  • Short bibliography

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L’année 2020 a été enveloppée par le spectre de différentes crises, du coronavirus aux injustices raciales et violences coloniales. Cette année a des répercussions sur nos façons de nous rassembler, de faire de la recherche, de penser, de faire et de consommer de l’art, et bien sûr, sur nos façons de survivre. Le spectral semble être un mode adéquat pour contempler les conditions qui planent au-dessus de notre époque, et qui continuent à hanter le cinéma et son étude.

Les chercheurs en Études Cinématographiques ont depuis longtemps adressé l’aspect fantomatique du cinématographique. Par exemple, Katherine Groo nous amène à considérer l’absence et la désintégration des films ainsi que l’im/matérialité du celluloïd comme partie intégrante de leur ontologie. Dans Zoological Surrealism, James Cahill affirme le pouvoir filmique de réanimer les morts, alors que le travail récent du chercheur canadien Andrew Burke s’intéresse à la façon dont les films contemporains canadiens sont hantés par les traces des années 70. Le corps filmé persiste lui aussi en tant que figure fantasmagorique. Pour Maggie Hennefeld, le spectral encapsule la corporalité transfigurée et miniaturisée des comédiennes des films des premiers temps, alors que Eliza Steinbock abord la notion de « shimmer » pour explorer l’illusoire et stupéfiante visibilité de la corporalité à la fois cinématographique et transgenre. L’héritage d’imagerie raciale du cinéma continue également de hanter ses pratiques imageantes; on se souvient de ce passage, dans Peau Noire, Masques Blancs, où Frantz Fanon déclare : « Impossible d’aller au cinéma sans me rencontrer. Je m’attends. À l’entracte, juste avant le film, je m’attends », un passage que reprend Kara Keeling dans son article « In the interval. » Le spectre de l’imaginaire racial du cinéma ne peut également se séparer de la présence continuelle de la violence systémique anti-noire, un spectre beaucoup trop réel.

Finalement, depuis que Derrida a conceptualisé le néologisme « hantologie » dans son livre de 1993 Spectres de Marx, plusieurs chercheurs, autant ceux mentionnés qu’au- delà des études médiatiques, ont engagé la notion de spectres. Ainsi, cette conférence demande également de quelle manière nous sommes hantés par le spectre du spectre? Comment le spectral est-il contenu et rendu par l’ontologie et les pratiques filmiques? Comment est-ce que le spectral habite les corps filmés, et comment est-ce qu’il cartographie au travers des imageries de marginalisation, de terreur et de violence? De quoi le cinéma est-il constamment hanté, et quelles sont les nouvelles actualisations de cette hantise?

Les sujets peuvent inclures, mais ne sont pas limités à :

  • Le paranormal et le fantomatique
  • La violence systémique/l’héritage violent
  • L’im/matérialité, l’ir/réalité, l’absence/la présence
  • L’in/corporalité
  • La répétition et la temporalité
  • La mémoire, le traumatisme, la perte, la peur, l’anxiété
  • La surface
  • Derrida/Hantologie
  • L’héritage de l’histoire cinématographique; l’étude et méthode historique

Soumissions :

Les parties intéressées doivent soumettre un bref résumé (de 300 à 500 mots) en .PDF, en anglais ou en français, d’ici le 7 décembre 2020 à l’adresse courrielle suivante : csgraduatestudies@gmail.com

Les soumissions doivent inclure les informations suivantes :

  • Votre nom
  • Niveau de scolarité
  • Institution d’attache
  • Titre de votre présentation
  • Votre résumé
  • Une courte bibliographie

Restez informé : Suivez-nous sur FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

 

CFP: 20/21 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada (Abstracts Due: Feb. 1, 2021)

 

August 19-21, 2021
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada

Keynote speakers will be Cherie Dimaline, Governor General’s award-winning author of The Marrow Thieves, and Wayde Compton, author of the award-winning story collection The Outer Harbour.

NOTE: This is a revised and extended call for proposals, directed to participants other than those who were previously accepted to the 2020 conference, which was postponed because of the pandemic. Should we still be unable to meet in person in August, the conference will be converted to an online format. 

In the midst of a global pandemic, the ways that speculative fiction, film, and television comment on the present as well as the future have become acutely evident. These genres ask readers to consider environmental, health, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. They are often used by their creators to represent and speculate on key societal issues, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of health safety, environmental destruction, and political conflict. In Canada, speculative writing has become a tool to interrogate colonial enterprises and open up spaces for marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference. A variety of speculative worlds have achieved popularity through films and television/internet series, some of which are adapted from other genres.

20/21 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada invites researchers and creators to present their own speculations about the futures and/or societies that are presented in various texts produced in or relating to Canada. What do speculative texts tell us? Which visions of “Canada” do we find in speculative texts? How do these visions reflect our own perceptions of the world? Does this kind of literary imagination offer space for grief, resilience, and hope? Does it help us respond constructively to crises or achieve social change? 

Proposals for both papers and panels are invited. These can take a range of approaches related to speculative writing in Canada, including: 

·       Speculations on global pandemics and other health crises

·       Environmental and/or technological changes and developments in speculative writing

·       Speculations on language and power

·       Indigenous and decolonizing speculations

·       Gender and sexuality in speculative writing

·       Disability in speculative writing

·       Geographical speculations in the real or virtual world

·       Speculative writing for children

·       Speculative poetry

·       Speculation and interdisciplinarity

·       Dystopian, utopian, and anti-utopian worlds

·       Apocalyptic scenarios and post-apocalyptic futures

·       Speculations on the screen: movies, documentaries, television and internet series, video games

·       Speculative adaptations

·       Speculative creations, including short works of speculative fiction or poetry* 

*The conference will also host sessions in which creators of speculative genres will be invited to present their works. Authors and artists are invited to propose 20-minute creative pieces; these may involve readings from written works, visual installations, performance pieces, or film presentations. 

Proposals should include the following:

1.       Your name, contact information (including email address and telephone number), and institutional affiliation.

2.       The title of your proposed 15- to 20-minute paper or presentation, AND a proposal of 250-300 words, identifying the works that will be your focus of your paper and outlining the argument to be presented OR describing your creative piece and the method of presentation or performance.

3.       A 50-word biographical statement. 

Panel proposals should include the above information for all participants. 

Please e-mail your proposal in a Word document to conference organizers Wendy Roy and Mabiana Camargo of the University of Saskatchewan at 2020vision@usask.ca by February 1, 2021 (extended deadline). 

Additional conference acceptances will be emailed in March, 2021. For further information, please visit the website or send an email to 2020vision@usask.ca

The University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis.

 

CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS FOR FSAC 2021
Version française 
ci-bas
 

The Annual (Virtual) Conference of the Film Studies Association of Canada June 1 – June 3, 2021
Hosted by University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

Held in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences Congress 2021 Congress Theme: Northern Relations

Martin Walsh Memorial Lecture: TBA

2021 Gerald Pratley Award: Meghan McDonald “Where Old Meets New: Visions of Newfoundland Modernity in Lee Wulff’s Travel Films”

Proposal Submission Deadline: January 15, 2021 Submit proposals by email to: conference2021@filmstudies.ca

 

Please note that proposals will only be considered from applications who are paid up members of the association. Memberships may be obtained/renewed here: http://www.filmstudies.ca/membership

FSAC is now seeking proposals for the 2021 virtual conference hosted by the University of Alberta, situated on Treaty 6 territory, traditional lands of First Nations and Metis people. We also acknowledge that many of us will be joining from across Turtle Island. We recognize and respect the histories, languages, and cultures of First Nations, Metis, Inuit, and all First Peoples of Canada. In recognizing this, we want to further acknowledge the implications of the Congress theme ‘Northern Relations’ as it stands in the very real contemporary context of continued efforts against anti-Black racism and decolonization as articulated by the Black Lives Matter and Idle No More movements. What then does it mean to contribute to scholarship within our association with the questions raised by scholars and activists, particularly in the midst of a global pandemic?

We welcome proposals for:

  • Individual presentations
  • Pre-Constituted panels
  • Workshops or roundtables
  • Screenings, exhibitions or other virtual events

These may be situated within topics related to the Congress theme noted above or on any other film or media studies topic.

This year the virtual setting gives us new opportunities to explore with format this includes, pre- recorded presentations, panels, workshops, roundtables, screenings; a combination of pre-recorded and live Q&A, or live presentations that are recorded and archived for later viewing. We encourage you to think about these additional options opened to us in planning your proposal. You may tentatively note this in your proposal but will not be held to it at this point. We will confirm your format preferences with you upon proposal acceptance.

Proposal format:

  • In an email include application name, affiliations, short bio (50 words), and paper title
  • Attach a 300-500 word abstract (with title), 3-5 relevant keywords and 2-5 bibliographicreferences.
  • Abstracts will be blind-reviewed; please do not include name or affiliation in the attachmentPre-constituted panels should be submitted by the proposed panel chair and include individual proposals (in the format above) with the title of the proposed panel indicated on each abstract.Workshop and Roundtable proposals should include the following information:
  • Chair’s name, position, institutional affiliation and email address
  • Title of workshop or roundtable
  • Abstract describing theme/focus being considered and format it will take (300-500 words)
  • List of participants including name, position, institutional affiliation, and email
  • Description of each participant’s contribution
  • 3-5 relevant key words
  • 2-5 bibliographic references

Additional information:

  • Presentations may be either in English or French.
  • Organizers and convenors of workshops and roundtables seeking broad inclusion from FSACmembers should feel free to use the FSAC list serve to solicit interest.
  • You can participate in a maximum of two presentations, neither of which can be the same kind(i.e., you may propose a paper and a workshop proposal but not two of either kind regardless ofwhether it is single or co-authored).
  • Individual presentations are no longer than 20 minutes (clips included) workshops androundtable presentations lengths may vary depending on the session.
  • All proposals will be adjudicated by the Programming Committee.
  • All papers presented at the FSAC conference must be original works. Proposals for previouslypresented papers will not be accepted.

Graduate Student Funding

  • Partial financial compensation for student members is normally dedicated to travel expenses
  • Given that this conference is virtual, you may apply for this year only to reduce your conference fees instead. More details and the application form will be posted in January at http://www.filmstudies.ca/category/grad-students

Audio-Visual Needs

  • All conference presentations will be hosted by the Congress appointed virtual platform run by Virtual Event Place. There will be 24/7 tech support available for the duration of the conference. The FSAC programming committee will work closely with the membership to ensure we support your needs running presentations and will provide a ‘how-to’ FAQ sheet in the spring in anticipation of the conference.

Conference Program Chair: Shana MacDonald (President, FSAC) Department of Communication Arts, University of Waterloo president@filmstudies.ca or shana.macdonald@uwaterloo.ca

 

 


 

 

APPEL À COMMUNICATIONS POUR LE CONGRÈS DE L’ACÉC 2021

Colloque annuel (virtuel) de l’Association canadienne d’études cinématographiques 1er au 3 juin 2021
Université de l’Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

Tenu dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines Thème du congrès: relations nordiques

Conférence commémorative Martin Walsh: (annonce à venir)

Conférence liée au prix Gerald Pratley 2021 : Meghan McDonald :
“Where Old Meets New: Visions of Newfoundland Modernity in Lee Wulff’s Travel Films”

Date de tombée pour les propositions de communication: le 15 janvier, 2021 Envoyez vos propositions à: conference2021@filmstudies.ca

 

Veuillez prendre note que vous devez être membre de l’Association au moment de la soumission de votre proposition. Vous pouvez vous inscrire ou renouveler votre inscription ici : http://www.filmstudies.ca/membership?lang=fr

 

L’ACÉC sollicite des propositions de communication pour son colloque annuel qui se tiendra virtuellement et dont l’hôte sera l’Université de l’Alberta, située sur le territoire du traité numéro 6, traditionnellement les terres des premières nations. Nous sommes également conscients que les participants proviendront de différents emplacements à travers le pays. Nous reconnaissons et respectons les histoires, les langues, et les cultures des Premières nations, des métis, des Inuits et de tous les premiers peuples au Canada. À travers cette reconnaissance, nous souhaitons souligner d’autant plus le thème du congrès de cette édition, « Relations nordiques », puisqu’il témoigne du contexte contemporain très réel en lien avec les efforts contre le racisme anti-noirs et la décolonisation, tel qu’articulés par les mouvements Black Lives Matter et Idle No More. Quelle signification peut être attribuée à la recherche au sein de notre association, en marge des questions soulevées par des chercheurs et des activistes, particulièrement en temps de pandémie mondiale?

 

Nous accueillons des propositions :

  • De communication individuelle
  • De panel préconstitué
  • D’ateliers ou de table ronde
  • De projection, d’exposition ou de tout autre événement portant les études cinématographiquesou médiatiques

Les propositions peuvent porter sur des sujets liés au thème du colloque ou sur tout autre sujet lié à l’étude du cinéma ou des médias.

Cette année, le contexte virtuel nous permet de nouvelles opportunités d’exploration au niveau du format, incluant des présentations, des panels, des ateliers, des tables rondes et des projections préenregistrés, accompagnés de période de questions en temps réel. Les présentations en direct pourront également être archivés pour visionnement ultérieur. Nous vous encourageons donc à garder ces possibilités en tête lors de la planification de votre proposition. Vous pouvez noter de telles intentions dans votre proposition tout en maintenant la possibilité de changer d’approche par la suite. Nous confirmerons vos préférences de format avec vous lors de l’acceptation de la proposition.

Format des propositions :

  • Dans un message électronique, indiquez votre nom, votre affiliation, une courte notice bio-bibliographique (50 mots ou moins) et le titre de votre communication.
  • En pièce jointe, veuillez inclure votre proposition de communication (300 à 500 mots) ainsi que votre titre et 3 à 5 références bibliographiques.
  • Puisque les propositions seront évaluées à l’aveugle, prière de ne pas inclure votre nom ni votre affiliation dans la pièce jointe.

Pour les panels préconstitués : les propositions seront soumises par le responsable du panel et devront inclure toutes les propositions individuelles (suivant le format ci- dessous). Vous devez inclure le titre du panel sur chacun des résumés.

Les propositions de table ronde et d’atelier doivent inclure les informations suivantes :

  • Nom du responsable de panel, poste/statut, affiliation et adresse courriel
  • Titre de l’atelier ou de la table ronde
  • Résumé décrivant le thème/sujet qui sera abordé, ainsi que le format (300 à 500 mots)
  • Liste des participant.e.s incluant leur nom, poste/statut, affiliation, et courriel
  • Descriptions des contributions des participant.e.s
  • 3 à 5 mots clés
  • 2 à 5 références bibliographiquesInformations et instructions supplémentaires :
  • Les présentations peuvent être en français ou en anglais.
  • Les organisateurs d’ateliers et de tables rondes qui sont à la recherche d’une participationélargie de la part des membres de l’ACÉC peuvent avoir recours au listserv de l’Associationafin de solliciter l’intérêt
  • Les communications individuelles ne doivent pas dépasser 20 minutes (incluant la présentation d’extraits).
  • La durée d’un panel, d’un atelier ou d’une table ronde peut varier selon leur organisation.
  • Toutes les propositions de communication seront évaluées par le comité organisateur du colloque.
  • Toutes les communications présentées à la conférence annuelle de l’ACÉC doivent être originales. Elles ne doivent être pas avoir été publiées ni présentées ailleurs. Les propositions de communications antérieures ne seront pas acceptées.

Financement des étudiants diplômés

  • Une compensation financière partielle pour les membres étudiants est normalement consacrée aux frais de voyage. Étant donné que cette conférence est virtuelle, vous ne pouvez demander cette année qu’à réduire vos frais de conférence à la place. De plus amples informations et le formulaire de candidature seront publiés en janvier sur le site http://www.filmstudies.ca/category/grad-students

Besoins audiovisuels

  • Toutes les présentations de la conférence seront accueillies par la plateforme virtuelle désignée par le Congrès et gérée par Virtual Event Place. Une assistance technique sera disponible 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7 pendant toute la durée de la conférence. Le comité de programmation de l’ACÉC  travaillera en étroite collaboration avec les membres pour s’assurer que nous répondons à vos besoins lors des présentations et fournira une feuille de questions fréquemment posées au printemps en prévision de la conférence.

Présidente du programme de colloque : Shana MacDonald (présidente, ACÉC) Départements des arts de la communication, Université de Waterloo president@filmstudies.ca ou shana.macdonald@uwaterloo.ca

 

 
 
Call for papers

The body on the screen and the body of the screen have always formed a compelling and productive pairing. From apparatus theory to production and exhibition histories, these two conceptualizations of cinematic bodies remain valuable avenues for reflecting on the use of images, their visibility, materiality, and presentation. As cinema continues to fracture and expand across our cell phones and living spaces, the screen is increasingly tangible, mobile, and ubiquitous. Like the mobile toys and popular illusions preceding modern cinema, these forms of new media present particular bodies on particular screens. The unifying darkness of the movie theatre is being replaced by a brighter multiplicity of global media objects, at once scattered and reconciled through social media, streaming platforms, and the internet in general. Even as borders and nations are re-entrenched, international connections are being forged. Though research on the body of the screen (in exhibition histories, affect theory, and tactility) and on the body on the screen (in critical theory on the making of race and gender) has proliferated in recent years, bringing the two together will produce a more nuanced consideration of how and who we are watching today.

In Cinephile 15.1, our goal is to bring these two types of bodies into conversation with one another and with ongoing discussions around each conceptualization of cinematic bodies. Our hope is to develop insights as to how bodies are being shown relative to screen technologies. As such, we invite scholarship on cinema’s multiple bodies. This includes papers on screen bodies (sites of exhibition and media histories) as well as bodies on screen (representations of race, gender, sexuality, disability) and especially research joining the two. Special preference will be given to papers discussing visual media.  

Possible topics can include (but are not limited to) any of the following: 

  • Media history and archaeology 
  • Representation of bodies on screen in terms and at the intersection of gender, race, disability, sexuality 
  • Materiality of film and the digital, in terms of the image or exhibition technology
  • Movement of bodies on screen in dance, pornography, fight sequences, mannerisms 
  • Encounters between film technology and form
  • Representation in Hollywood of celebrity, beauty, norms
  • Cross-cultural and international examinations of the body on screen
  • Alternative exhibition practices and histories
  • Relationship between body and screen, offering sensuality and/or violence 

We encourage submissions from graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and established scholars. Papers should be between 2,000-3,500 words, follow MLA guidelines, and include a detailed works cited page, as well as a short biography of the author. Submissions should be directed toward SUBMISSIONS@CINEPHILE.CA and general inquiries toward INFO@CINEPHILE.CA.

Submissions are due by October 11, 2020.

Cinephile is the University of British Columbia’s film journal, published with the continued support of the Centre for Cinema Studies. Previous issues have featured original essays by such noted scholars as Lee Edelman, Slavoj Žižek, Paul Wells, Murray Pomerance, Ivone Marguiles, Matt Hills, Barry Keith Grant, K.J. Donnelly, and Sarah Kozloff. Since 2009, the journal has adopted a blind review process and has moved to annual publication. It is available both online and in print via subscription and selected retailers.

Incoming editors: Harrison Wade and Kate Wise

 
CFP Conference

Screening Censorship Conference: New Histories, Perspectives, and Theories on Film and Screen Censorship
Ghent, Belgium, October 16-17, 2020

UPDATE: Our conference is going ahead. We also adapt, of course, to the changing world. Based on abstract submissions Screening Censorship Conference will adjust to circumstances, and implement best practices of social distancing and (if needed) virtual attendance to ensure the safety and comfort of delegates, presenters and attendees. The new deadline for abstracts is August 15, 2020. For more information, please contact Daniel Biltereyst (daniel.biltereyst@ugent.be) and/or Ernest Mathijs (ernest.mathijs@ubc.ca).

Academic keynote speakers:
Professor Richard Maltby (Flinders University, Australia)
Professor Linda Williams (University of California, Berkeley, USA)

Professional keynote speakers:
Manuel Mozos (filmmaker, Portugal)
Rachel Talalay (film director/producer, US/Canada)

Throughout the history of film and cinema, censorship has existed everywherein all kinds of shapes, colors, and dimensions. The act of restricting the free production, circulation, screening and consumption of movies was never unique to authoritarian regimes. Age restrictions, film cuttings, bans, industry discouragements, and other types of censorial interventions also occurred in countries where media freedom and the freedom of speech were and are highly regarded principles. Censorship has had far-reaching implications on filmmakers, distributors, exhibitors, and audiences across generations, and across genres. Hard, strict institutional censorship often came alongside implied or ‘suggested’ forms of soft censorship, including, importantly, the self-censorship or audiences disciplined into particular viewership positions.

Today, soft and hard censorship co-exist in even more fluid forms. The acts of banning, regulating, trimming, and tailoring films for ‘harmless’ consumption, by bureaucracies, pressure groups and activists, are frequently embedded within wider debates about media use. But film nonetheless remains a ‘banner issue’, a point of reference for what constitutes screen censorship.

From the long tradition of investigating film censorship onwards, this conference aims at reflecting upon recent changes in policies, strategies and practices of film censorship, both in the past and in today’s media landscape. Amongst the many questions, this conference asks:

  • What are film history’s lessons from censorship?

  • What are the contours of censorship today?

  • Is censorship still a useful concept? How has it changed?

  • How do new or renewed sensitivities influence censorship today, in terms of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, ageism, ableism?

  • How do censorships compare, across time, space, genre, and technologies?

  • What is the role of social media in debates about censorship? How do we define film censorship in times of massive content moderation on social media platforms?

  • How does film censorship work on different screens: in the theatre, on television, on in-flight, mobile, across multitudes of digital screens?

  • What are the ‘aesthetics’ of censorship today and what is the function of pastiche, subversion, ‘just joking’, and other kinds of boundary-challenging work?

  • What do recent controversies and provocations reveal about the evolution of censorship?

  • What is the relationship between incidents and interventions in production culture, artistic integrity, and censorship?

  • What is censorship’s relationship with ‘hardcore’ and explicit material, past and now? If censorship is not always a simple matter of repression from above, but of conflicting discursive constructions arising from below, how do we account for the history of the emergence of hard-core pornography beyond thinking of it as the liberalization of censorship?

    Screening Censorship also invites reflections on the changing research environment:

  • What are the tools for studying censorship today?

  • How have digital technologies affected the study of censorship?

  • What is the influence of new film and cinema historiography in exploring practices of distributing, screening, consuming and audience’s experiences of film and screen censorship?

Screening Censorship aims to showcase academic and industry voices on the issue of the shifting practices of censoring films on the different screens. The four keynote addresses confirmed for the symposium reflect that goal. The conference is organized in tandem with the 47thInternational Film Fest Ghent (FIAPF accredited, Variety’s top-50 must-attend), and aims to examine how film and cinema censorship, as a concept and as a practice (ad hoc and post hoc), functions 20 years into the 21st Century.

Screening Censorship welcomes contributions for 20-minute presentations from scholars, artists and practitioners whose work pertains to topics and themes of film and screen censorship. We are seeking abstracts for individual papers and panels of three or four contributors on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Theories, concepts, and discourses on film censorship, control, discipline, silencing, content moderation

  • New film censorship policies, strategies, tactics, practices

  • The aesthetics of film censorship, subversion, pastiche

  • Activism and resistance

  • Film censorship, audiences and reception

  • Institutions and power

  • Comparison, entangled history, histoire croisée

  • Film censorship and the museum: archives, heritage, platforms

  • Artistic integrity, interventions, re-use

  • Film censorship cases, controversies, panics

  • Digital tools and new methods for doing film censorship research today

Please send abstracts of 300 words and a 100-word biography to Daniel Biltereyst (daniel.biltereyst@ugent.be) and Ernest Mathijs (ernest.mathijs@ubc.ca) by August 15th, 2020, and address any queries to the same addresses. Abstracts should be submitted following this order: (a) author(s); (b) affiliation; (c) email address; (d) title of abstract; (e) body of abstract; (f) bibliography. E-mails should carry the subject line: Screening Censorship Abstract Submission.

Conference sponsored by Digital Cinema Studies (DICIS, FWO Flanders) in collaboration with The Centre for Cinema and Media Studies (UBC).

Conference venue: Film-Plateau, Paddenhoek 3, Ghent, Belgium. Conference website: www.censorship-symposium.org (under construction)

 
CFP Transformative Works and Cultures:
Fandom Histories 


Fans demonstrate a broad interest in the past, both of their objects of fandom and their own communities. They collect, catalog, preserve, restore, and publicly display historical artifacts and information in their own archives and museums. They study archival materials and collections, interview witnesses, and read historical scholarship, developing historical narratives and theses. Their research materializes in the form of analog and digital nonfiction media such as print and online publications, documentaries, podcasts, video tutorials, and pedagogical initiatives. Through their work, fans historicize their own fandom and tie it into broader historical questions, connecting to issues like heritage, gender, and the nation. While some fans do this as community historians, focused on small and self-financed groups, others work within large and well-known cultural organizations and businesses, bringing this work into the mainstream.

The goal for this special issue of Transformative Works and Cultures is to explore the question of how fans produce knowledge about the past and actively engage with history. We are particularly interested in essays that show what fans do as historians, such as running publicly accessible archives and museums, and using archival materials for the production of nonfiction media. We want to shift direction from the question of why and how fans are collecting to analyses of why, how, and with what impact fans are creating and disseminating knowledge about the past. Such contributions will further our understanding of how central engagements with the past are to individual and collective fan identities, and how fandom connects to historical debates.

We encourage contributions covering all geographies and forms of fandom, including film, television, music, games, sport, fashion, celebrity culture, themed environments, theatre, dance, and opera. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Theorizing fans as historians.
• Fan-produced nonfiction media about the past.
• Use of archival and historical materials in fan works.
• Fan-run archives and museums.
• Memorialization of fandom.
• Transmedial practices in fan-made histories.
• Fan-made histories as fan pedagogy.
• History making and inclusion/exclusion in fandom.
• Fans as historians and the media and/or heritage industries.

 

Submission guidelines
Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) is an international peer-reviewed online Gold Open Access publication of the nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works copyrighted under a Creative Commons License. TWC aims to provide a publishing outlet that welcomes fan-related topics and to promote dialogue between the academic community and the fan community. TWC accommodates academic articles of varying scope as well as other forms that embrace the technical possibilities of the Web and test the limits of the genre of academic writing.

Theory: Conceptual essays. Peer review, 6,000–8,000 words.
Praxis: Case study essays. Peer review, 5,000–7,000 words.
Symposium: Short commentary. Editorial review, 1,500–2,500 words.

Please visit TWC’s website (http://journal.transformativeworks.org/) for complete submission guidelines, or email the TWC Editor (editor [AT] transformativeworks.org).

Contact—Contact guest editors Philipp Dominik Keidl and Abby Waysdorf with any questions or inquiries at fansmakehistory [AT] gmail.com.

Due date—January 1, 2021, for estimated March 15, 2022 publication.

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS CINEACTION 101

The next issue will focus on two themes.

Film and Radical Politics in the Global Crisis

A plague stalks the world and economies are collapsing. Are we forced to imagine the end of the world and the end of capitalism? What is the relationship of film and media to this terrifying live spectacle? How is it represented? What place and responsibility for radical films and filmmakers? What possible transformative or disastrous outcomes in this moment of contradiction and crisis?

Films and filmmakers have a long history of involvement in moments of social conflict and change, war and revolution. Soviet filmmakers in the Russian revolution, Renoir and the French Popular Front, the avant-garde cinema from Surrealism on, the Hollywood Reds and the blacklist, the NFB in WWll, anti-fascism and Neo-Realism, the Third Cinema of anti-colonial struggles from the fifties on, the enduring impact in both documentary and fiction of the social movements of the sixties and the many New Lefts and more… What is the current state of this radical lineage, what contemporary explorations, what changed role for film and media now. Open to a wide range of subjects and perspectives.

Horror Films

The horror genre remains enduringly popular, especially in this apocalyptic moment, and often politically challenging, in films and television all over the world. We welcome submissions on the genre, particular films, directors, from any national, aesthetic or political perspective.

Submissions or queries to Scott Forsyth, sforsyth@yorku.ca or cineaction@cineaction.ca

Deadline: September 1, 2020

 

Call for Submissions

2020 Annual Graduate Music Conference

Department of Music, University of Alberta

“Revisualizing Sound and Music”

Edmonton, Canada

May 15-16, 2020

The Graduate Music Students’ Association (GMSA) of the University of Alberta is pleased to announce a call for submissions for our annual NCounters Graduate Conference. The conference will take place on Friday, May 15 and Saturday, March 16, 2020

Music visualizes our wildest dreams and imaginations, and revisualizes the finest creations of humanity. At the GMSA’s NCounters Conference, we thrive to inquire and “revisualize” the endless possibilities of music research and discourse. As a multi-formatted conference, we aim to facilitate innovative graduate research by providing a platform and safe space for grad students from everywhere to present their work and engage with fellow researchers in an inclusive and interdisciplinary environment. 

We encourage submissions from any topic in the study of music including but not limited to:

–       Musicology; ethnomusicology; music theory

–       Film and media music; popular music

–       Composition; performance

–       Music education; music therapy

We also welcome compositions and lecture recitals including but not limited to:  

–       Composed concert pieces 

–       Electroacoustic compositions

–       Improvised music performances

–       Sound Installations (please note that space is limited

This year, we are delighted to have two distinguished scholars as keynote speakers

Dr. Emilie LeBel, Assistant Professor of Composition from MacEwan University. She specializes in orchestral music composition, chamber music composition, electronic music, as well as integrated works that apply digital and intermedia concert pieces. She is an affiliated composer at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Selected works include Hiraeth (2019, Migration No. 2), Mark Takeshi McGregor, Lutalica, Redshift Records; and Navigational view of South Foreland Point and the Kent Coast, 1840 (2018), in Land’s End Ensemble, Pulling the Light, Centrediscs.

Dr. Brian Fauteux, Assistant Professor of Popular Music from the University of Alberta. His research areas include cultural studies, media studies, film, and is particularly interested in music industries and music radio, which integrate discourses of cultural studies, history, and policies. He is currently working on a SSHRC-funded research that examines copyright and cultural labor issues in the digital music industries. Selected publications include Music in Range: The Culture of Canadian Campus Radio (2015); and “The Radio Host and Piloted Listening in the Digital Age: CBC Radio 3 and Its Online Listening Community” (2017).

Paper presentations are no longer than 20 minutes and lecture recitals should be no longer than 30 minutes, all followed by a 10-minute question period. For compositions, please send submission samples in either an MP3 or MP4 format, or a URL link. If attaching a score, please format it as a PDF file. 

Please submit an abstract of no longer than 350 words as a Word or PDF attachment to gmsa@ualberta.ca no later than Sunday, March 15, 2020. In the body of the email, please include name, affiliation, contact information and A/V requirements

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at gmsa@ualberta.ca. We look forward to your submissions!