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Besides the Screen: Geographies, Spaces, and Places Outside the Screen 

University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC), June 10-12, 2021

 

Conference Organisers: 

Dr. Virginia Crisp, Senior Lecturer in Culture, Media & Creative Industries, King’s College, London (UK)

Dr. Gabriel Menotti, Assistant Professor in the Film & Media Department, Queen’s University (Canada)

Dr. Corey Schultz, Associate Professor in the School of International Communications, University of Nottingham Ningbo China

 

Website: https://besidesthescreen.com 

 

CFP deadline: April 9, 2021 

As a conclusion to the (slightly delayed) Besides the Screen 10th Anniversary programme of events, the 2021 conference builds upon the network’s previous work examining the continuing transformations of audiovisual practice, to investigate the reconfigurations of screen industries, cultures, spaces and places through examining sites of production, infrastructures of circulation, film festivals, film tourism, and city branding. In short, the way place/space intersects with the multiple sites of production, circulation, promotion and consumption surrounding screen (incl. Film/TV, games, interactive arts) industries and cultures. The conference will explore the more established scholarship related to these topics (film festivals, city branding, transnational co-production, film/TV tourism) as well as expanding the conversation to represent the newly established or emerging topics (e-sports, virtual concerts). 

The conference will be a hybrid (physical/virtual) event hosted by the School of International Communications at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (CN), in partnership with King’s College, London (UK) and Queen’s University (CA). As ever with BtSN events, the theme of the conference is deliberately expansive to bring together interdisciplinary perspectives and we welcome scholars emerging and established to submit proposals for papers, video essays, and short films dealing with topics such as: 

  • Sites of production, promotion, and consumption 
  • Infrastructures of circulation  
  • Transnational co-productions 
  • Media festivals and theatrical exhibition  
  • Film festivals 
  • E-sports 
  • Virtual events / concerts 
  • Film tourism 
  • Screen media and city branding 

 

Submission Details: 

 

Paper proposals should be made via the online form on the website –https://besidesthescreen.com – and require the following information: 

  • abstract (under 300 words); 
  • 3-5 keywords; 
  • short biography (150 – 200 words); 
  • your time zone (NB: the conference will take place in Beijing Standard Time and so we will consider time zones when scheduling real-time panel discussions); 
  • whether you would prefer an in-person or pre-recorded presentation (due to current COVID-19 travel restrictions, we strongly anticipate that people from outside China won’t be able to attend in person). 

Video essay and short film submissions (under 20 minutes) should be made via the online form and require the following information:  

  • a link to the film/video essay;  
  • a short summary (under 300 words); 
  • 3-5 keywords; 
  • biography (150 – 200 words).   

If you experience any issues with the submission form please email besidesthescreen@gmail.com with the email header NINGBO21 – Submission issue. Please note, email submissions will not be accepted. 

Deadline – April 9, 2021. We will accept submissions up to midnight in the proposer’s timezone. 

 

Call for Papers:

Reframing the Nation: Diasporic Racialized, Indigenous & Queer BIPOC Canadian Independent Women Filmmakers 1990-2020.

 

Reframing the Nation is the first critical film anthology from an intersectional Canadian context that is dedicated to a close engagement with impactful films produced by racialized diasporic, indigenous, and Queer BIPOC independent women filmmakers in Canada. This collection charts the cinematic visions and perspectives of first and second generation diasporic and indigenous filmmakers and Queer BIack, Indigenous, Women of Colour Canadian Independent Women Filmmakers working from 1990-2020. Works considered can be shorts or features that are independent Canadian productions. Independent films tend to reflect artistic practices that are rooted in personal, political, aesthetic, cultural, philosophical, and social justice concerns, they are typically arts council funded and/or co-produced with other agencies. A vital component of independent film is that the filmmaker maintains artistic/editorial control over their work. Comparative papers between Canadian productions and international productions are welcome.

 

Please Submit Abstracts (300 words) & short bio (125 words) up until April 15, 2021
Notification of acceptance: within three weeks of receipt of the abstract.
Submission of Papers: 15-20 pages preferred, to a maximum of 5,000 words.
Final Draft Due: by December 15, 2021. (deadline extended due to pandemic).

Contributions from any doctoral candidates, pre-tenure and tenured faculty doing research in the areas of this collection are welcome.
Inquiries to Contributing Editor: Dr. Michelle Mohabeer (Lecturer & Filmmaker) mmohabee@yorku.ca

 

Submissions may consider the following: 

  • Documentary and Narrative features, short films, hybrid films or activist documentaries with thoughtful approaches. Oppositional and Fringe works also welcome.
  • Analyses of intersectional representations of social justice issues or settler nation.
  • Cultural identities and diasporic aesthetics: the merging of aesthetics and politics; to explore geographies of space/place, fragmented uprooted identities, home and belonging, intersectional identities, politics of displacement, memory and history, contesting dominant narratives of Canada as a nation etc.
  • Theorizing and analyzing diasporic works by Canadian racialized women or queer/trans women of colour, black and indigenous women filmmakers from decolonial, post-colonial, queer diasporic or transnational contexts.
  • Thematic or textual analysis of feature films or (body of short films) by sole or multiple BIPOC women filmmakers.
  • Aesthetic/formal approaches in documentary, narrative, experimental, and hybrid films (all genres and platforms considered)
  • Historiography of film/video by BIPOC women filmmakers in Canada (1990-2020)
  • Festivals & Distributors: supporting works by Indigenous women & women of colour filmmakers in Canada. Also BIPOC Organizations that support film/media arts.
  • Reception/audience studies of works produced by Indigenous/women of colour in Canada.
  • The decolonial use of technologies (digital and film) in works by Canadian racialized/queer diasporic and Indigenous women filmmakers.
  • Queer & Transgender films by Indigenous and women of colour filmmakers in Canada.
 
The UC Santa Barbara Media Fields Collective is excited to announce the call for papers for issue 17 of Media Fields: Critical Explorations of Media in Space.


Please email submissions to submissions@mediafieldsjournal.org by May 7, 2021.
You can review our submission guidelines at mediafieldsjournal.org.



Call for Submissions

Modularity and Modification
Media Fields: Critical Explorations of Media in Space, Issue 17


To move, media must be flexible. Think, for instance, of the remarkably consistent form of the upscale multiplex that has made a home for global blockbuster cinema in China, Mexico, India, Belgium, and Canada alike. Or consider the efforts of communities who have had to salvage, appropriate, and alter telecommunications infrastructure—developing their own technical expertise in the process—in an effort to bring internet connectivity to remote areas neglected by corporate service providers. While distinct, these examples each raise the question of how media flexibility is underpinned by the tension between modularity and modification.

Modularity involves the repetition, standardization, and recombination of existing forms: exhibitors use the standard form of the multiplex to signify the “world-class” status of their up-to-date cinemas, while amateur technicians rely on widely used antennas, wires, and protocols to plug into existing internet infrastructure. Conversely, modification calls on the ability to adapt given materials (including technologies, practices, ideas, and senses of self) to prevailing conditions: theatre chains grapple with issues of urban development, audiences, and taste cultures as they develop new sites in new locales, while communities adapt technology to the resources they have, the landscapes they inhabit, and the histories they share to make their projects work. In these and other examples, media forge the channels along which modular elements can be disseminated and within which opportunities for modification take root.

Considering these concepts as an entry point for the study of media in space immediately conjures associations with Michel de Certeau’s opposition between strategy and tactics. If modularity offers the opportunity to expand the “proper place” of the powerful and extend the imposed terrain on which the subjected must move, modification suggests the potential to rework that terrain along tactical lines. The modularity of communication infrastructures and media forms might suggest narratives of spatial and temporal compression and, in turn, buttress colonial narratives that render distant, foreign spaces more legible, accessible, or profitable for powerful interests. Conversely, the modification of modular media genres, formats, technologies, and environments evokes profuse examples of narratives of localized or regionalized difference, adaptation, resistance, and even refusal.

Such associations between modularity, modification, power, and resistance do not hold seamlessly, and are useful only to the extent that they are contextualized and questioned. Media scholarship that engages in this work does not necessarily dispense with familiar associations with these concepts but expose the frictions and counternarratives that arise out of close, critical analysis. Reconsidering these associations raises questions including: What are productive ways of conceptualizing modification without fetishizing neoliberal concepts of ingenuity that displace the responsibilities of media institutions and telecommunications services onto individuals? How might we understand corporate modularity as involving forms of differentiation that enable flows of capital and hegemony? Where can we see the activities of user or audience modification being channeled or controlled by powerful interests? In what ways does modularity emerge from individuals, social groups, and communities rather than being imposed on them? Can we uncover or recover cases that subvert binaries associating modularity with the homogenous, the corporate, and the global and modification with the heterogenous, the individual, and the local?

The Media Fields Editorial Collective in the Department of Film and Media at the University of California, Santa Barbara seeks papers that interrogate the imbrication of modularity and modification in spatial practices and imaginaries and put forward thought-provoking examples of how they might be operationalized in the service of today’s media scholarship.

Potential paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Technological standards and standardization
  • Circulating genres and formats
  • Digital “modding”
  • Film and television “packaging”
  • Franchises, sequels, spinoffs, ripoffs, and reboots
  • Platform systems and their users
  • Communication infrastructures and their nodes
 
 
Mary Michael and Charlotte Orzel
Issue Co-Editors
Media Fields Journal
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The Kardashians and Trans Femininity: Appropriation, Artificiality, and Racial Erasure”

Dossier for TSQ*Now

Edited by Dr. Laura Stamm (University of Pittsburgh)

 

With Keeping Up With the Kardashians ending after 19 seasons, it seems timely to reflect upon the ways in which the Kardashian aesthetic transformation has been influenced by (and appropriated) trans femininity. This dossier will ideally include both paranoid and reparative readings. For, as much as Kardashian femininity could not exist without trans femininity, perhaps there is a way in which the Kardashian women have also made trans femininity increasingly possible. What I mean is that the drag queen, trans feminine aesthetic that the Kardashian women have so spectacularly appropriated has also changed the way we conceive of cis femininity as tied to any sort of aesthetic of authenticity. Taken even further, could we create a genealogy of contemporary trans femininity through a reading of the Kardashians? How can we put questions of race at the center of this trans-femme-cis-femme circuit? 

 

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Critical race studies
  • Trans of color critique
  • TV studies
  • Drag culture
  • Body-as-technology critique
  • Personal narrative
  • Social media technology

 

I am seeking contributions for a dossier for TSQ*Now, an online forum on trans studies organized by the TSQ editorial collective. The forum allows scholars to respond to currents issues with more immediacy and flexibility than traditional academic publishing. I am interested in hearing from scholars of any rank, and I especially encourage trans scholars to submit.

 

Interested writers should submit a 150-200 word abstract and a brief bio with affiliation and contact information to laura.e.stamm@gmail.com by February 1st. I am also happy to answer any questions. 

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CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS
 

Queer Emergencies

An online symposium organized in conjunction with the Toronto Queer Film Festival
April 24 & 25, 2021

 

Proposal deadline: Jan 5, 2021  Submit proposals here.

Everyone is welcome to apply. All participants will be paid.

Confirmed keynote speaker:  Dean Spade with more TBA

 

The Toronto Queer Film Festival is seeking proposals for a symposium on the theme of Queer Emergencies that aims to address queer, trans, and two-spirit experiences and challenges in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

This is a landmark time for humanity. Homebound and with resources dwindling, many of us continue to create art and engage in solidarity practices from within our communities. Queer Emergencies celebrates the resilience, resistance and creativity of our community in its response to the intense pressures and transformations wrought by the global pandemic. It seeks to engage work that is vital in this moment, speaking to the unique challenges that precarious and marginalized queer and trans communities are facing today. 

We’ve noticed a prevailing capitalist logic to the disbursement of resources, while artists are incurring losses of incomes and/or assets due to the economic contraction caused by widespread social distancing measures. Current structuring of funds prioritizes the privileged among us, leaving most people who were already struggling with few to no resources. 

The Queer Emergencies 2021 Symposium asks the question: what are our current limitations and how can we work within them in creative ways?  What are the issues facing queer, trans and two-spirit communities in the current moment and how can we allow them to radicalize our collective future? 

As ever, TQFF’s mandate remains to decolonize queer and trans art and media histories and practices. This symposium seeks projects with a unique perspective who frame their work in a critical, anti-oppressive and future-bound model.

We are interested in papers, workshops, roundtables, readings, performances that critically engage and reckon with and through media and the arts.

 

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Queer and/or Indigenous histories of organizing and reisistence to public health crises

  • Anti-racism/decolonization in artistic practices and/or arts organizations

  • Unpacking inclusion & building social/class alliances and solidarity

  • Queer and/or Indigenous perspectives on climate emergency, both locally and beyond

  • Mutual aid & food justice

  • Solidarity & allyship both within the queer/trans/2S communities and beyond

  • Community resilience & self-care 

  • Envisioning the future of queer and trans resistance 

  • Queer and trans organizing and activism before, during and after COVID

  • Mental health and artistic production/practices during and after COVID

  • Queer/trans pandemic crip time: living and working with chronic illness and disability

  • Essential and abandoned: intersectional (anti-racism, decolonial, disability justice) approaches to the disproportionate impact of economic and public health failures on our queer/trans/2S communities

  • Coalitional organizing and solidarities: defunding the police, abolishing prisons, workplace safety, and envisioning a world where public health and art are prioritized over property, police, prisons, and imperial global militarism

  • Combatting, strategizing/organizing against, and documenting the present and future of genocide (pandemics, climate emergency, structured institutional/infrastructure neglect and abandonment)

  • Queer migrant justice: open borders, mass migration, and worldwide worker solidarity

  • Rent strikes, mass evictions, kangaroo “housing courts,” and housing for all 

 

While papers, roundtables, workshops, and other typical academic conference formats are welcomed, we especially encourage more creative formats including but not limited to: arts-based research, poster presentations, poetry, performances, music, readings, artist talks, and other presentation formats that innovate and encourage online participation. As a symposium organized with a film festival, we are particularly interested in contributions that engage in some way with queer and trans media and/or art practices.

As a grassroots organization embedded within our communities, the Toronto Queer Film Festival encourages contributions from folks across our community – not just academics embedded within universities, but also independent scholars, activists, artists, community members, and other people with lived experience that would provide valuable perspectives to discussions on global queer liberation art and media.

 

Everyone is welcome to apply.

Please submit the following information via our online form by Jan 5, 2021

  • Name

  • Institutional or other affiliation (if applicable)

  • Presentation format (i.e. paper, roundtable, workshop, creative)

  • Presentation title

  • 250 word abstract

  • Email address you can be contacted at

  • Accessibility needs

 

This symposium will be held online. We are particularly interested in submissions that take full advantage of the capabilities of online platforms. Individual papers and presentations should be no more than 15 minutes. Roundtables, workshops, panels, should be no more than 1 hour, including opportunity for Q&A. We will also accept submission for proposals with shorter durations (i.e. lightning talks, microsessions, etc).

Only selected participants will be notified.

Selected participants will be notified of their acceptance by January 30, 2021

 

ABOUT THE TORONTO QUEER FILM FESTIVAL

TQFF is a registered not-for profit organization formed and run by an ad-hoc collective of artists and arts professionals who came together in 2016 to launch the Toronto Queer Film Festival. We began this project out of an urgent need to provide screen space in Toronto for media by and about marginalized queer and trans people.

 

We have three primary mandates:

1) to exhibit queer independent and experimental film and video art;

2) to support the production of alternative queer film and video art through community-based arts education and professional development; and

3) to foster community engagement with the arts by welcoming all attendees to our accessible venues with “pay what you can” pricing for events, ASL interpretation, and closed captioning of all programs.

 

TQFF distinguishes itself from other Toronto cultural events that serve the LGBT community by focusing on experimental time-based media that challenges and expands social, political, and artistic conventions. Our curatorial mandate is to centre the programming of work by and about queer and trans people of colour, Indigenous people, and people with disabilities, as well as the work of local artists, low-income, DIY filmmakers, and emerging artists.

 

You can read more about TQFF on our website: https://torontoqueerfilmfest.com/about/

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Call for Submissions: Special Issue on “Critical and Creative Engagements with Petro-Media”

Guest edited by Rachel W. Jekanowski (Memorial University) & Emily Roehl (Texas State University)

 

Submission Deadline: December 10, 2020

This special issue of Imaginations will concentrate on media engaging with petroleum and its attendant socio-political and economic structures. Drawing on technology and media studies, energy humanities scholarship, and a range of methods in visual and cultural studies, the contributors will theorize contemporary and historical uses of media to resist and facilitate petroleum infrastructures. Building on Imaginations’ long-standingengagement with petrocultures scholarship, including their 2012 special issue “Sighting Oil” (Sheena Wilson and Andrew Pendakis, eds.), this issue will mobilize critiques of corporate petro-media with decolonial methods from a range of disciplines, focusing on the interlacing of oil, settler colonialism, Indigenous resurgence, and media production. The issue will consist of peer-reviewed essays from scholars and practitioners, artist interviews and contributions (including samples of multimedia work with accompanying artists statements), and a review section (including a comparative book review essay, curatorial reviews and responses to digital exhibitions in the age of COVID-19, etc.). We are particularly invested in featuring research-creation and media-rich scholarship.

We invite submissions that take up different facets of media production by Indigenous, immigrant, and settler artists, activists, and corporate representatives to examine the complex entanglements of cultural production, settler colonialism, and fossil fuel extraction. Given our location on occupied Indigenous territories where we work as researchers and educators, we assert that energy developments are always already implicated within histories of colonialism and white settlement in North America. Critically, we invite contributions that include and foreground visual media in their

analyses, featuring original videos, archival photographs and film stills, and photographs of authors’ art installations.

We invite submissions that engage with the following topics (including but not limited to):

  • the way media networks and ways of viewing the world support the extraction, production, and consumption of fossil fuels and interact with the financial and socio-political systems the production of oil requires;
  • the way media, like energy infrastructures, are used as conduits for the transportation and transmission of fuel, people, capital, and ideas about sovereignty, identity, futurity, and relationships to the nonhuman world;
  • the way various media—from corporate films, digital photography, games, and television advertisements, to activist protests and social media—have alternatively been used to uphold, legitimize, critique, and resist energy practices within settler colonial nations like Canada and the United States.

Submissions are also welcome from the following fields and approaches (including but not limited to):

  • cultural studies
  • energy studies
  • critical Indigenous studies
  • critical settler colonial studies
  • decolonial approaches to media
  • environmental humanities
  • Indigenous sovereignty
  • film and media studies
  • literary studies
  • multimedia and digital arts
  • petrocultures
  • research-creation methods
  • social and environmental justice
  • feminist, queer, and posthumanist approaches to petro-media interventions from critical race studies

In sum, this special issue will contribute to discussions within media and literature studies about the imbrication of energy, communication, and art, while foregrounding Indigenous resurgence, energy justice movements, and deepening attention to the asymmetrical effects of climate change on communities and environments.

Submission Guidelines

Recognizing the challenges of producing work during a pandemic, and reflecting the editors’ commitment to experimenting with mixed methodologies and media-rich scholarship, this special issue will feature shorter research essays alongside artist submissions and research-creation. Research essays should be 3000-5000 words; artist contributions and curatorial reviews can be 500-2000 words. Citations should adhere to the MLA Style Guide.

All submissions must be sent to imaginations@ualberta.ca and copied to mrln@yorku.ca and bbellamy@ualberta.ca. Please include a separate sheet with short biographical and contact information. Media can be emailed as an attachment or accessible by hyperlink.

Please see the full list of author submission guidelines available on the Imaginations Journal website. The Imaginations style sheet is accessible here.

Submission deadline is December 10, 2020.

We plan to notify contributors as to the status of their submissions by May 2021 at the latest. The special issue is tentatively planned for publication in Fall 2021.

Contact Us

Please direct questions and inquiries to issue editors Emily Roehl (e.a.roehl@gmail.com) and Rachel W. Jekanowski (rjekanowski@mun.ca).

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The Media Architecture Biennale (MAB) is the world’s premier event on media architecture, urban interaction design, and urban informatics. It brings together architects, artists and designers, leading thinkers on urban design, key industry and government representatives as well as community activists. Together, they explore the design and role of media in the built environment and its implications for urban communities and ecosystems.

MAB20 consists of a series of events, meet-ups and publications taking place on- and offline between March 2019 and July 2021. A final event including an award show, workshops and a conference with keynotes and an academic track, is scheduled from July 28th – July 2nd, 2021 to take place in Amsterdam and Utrecht.
 
The theme of MAB’s 6th edition is Futures Implied, which opens up investigations into future scenarios implied in today’s urban transformations and emerging technologies like digital platforms, responsive technologies and smart city promises. How can we shape technologies and spaces to respond to their surroundings, contributing to cities that are both socially and ecologically sustainable? The point of departure is that technologies are never neutral enablers, they are built upon numerous spoken and unspoken assumptions about urban life, each with their own implications for both social relations as well as their effect on the natural ecosystem.

We invite papers from academics, students, and industry practitioners that align with the theme 
“Futures Implied” and the sub-themes: “Playful & Artistic Civic Engagement”“The Aesthetics and Poetics of Responsive Urban Spaces”“Restorative Cities”, “More-than-Human-Cities”, and “Citizens’ digital rights in the era of platform ecologies.” Paper contributions should address current practices, discuss theoretical approaches, or present novel research that explore and further develop our understanding of media architecture through relevant case studies, design processes, and community and industry examples.

Deadline: January 25th, 2021
Notification of acceptance: 29 March, 2021
All revisions due & Camera Ready: 24 May, 2021
Click Here for more info >>
 

MAB20 is organized by the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and the [urban interfaces] group at Utrecht University, in collaboration with the Media Architecture Institute.

Join the MAB-Community on  Facebook  |  Instagram  |  Twitter  |  LinkedIn

For more information, visit www.mab.org or contact us via info@mab20.org

 
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What is the Witch Institute?

In the last few years, the witch has re-emerged as a powerful political symbol. Across cinemas and television, in books and podcasts, and via hashtag activism, the proliferation of the witch in media signals a critique of the existing world order and its reliance on the subjugation of marginalized peoples. In order to better understand the meaning and impact of current media representations of the witch, we will hold an expanded conversation between activists, artists, filmmakers, curators, historians, scholars, witches, feminists, healers, and more.

The Witch Institute is a collaborative meeting space for those who are interested in responding to contemporary imaginings of the witch in popular and visual culture. It is a place to share diverse understandings of witches and witchcraft, and to complicate, reframe, and remediate media representations that often continue to perpetuate colonial, misogynistic, and Eurocentric stereotypes of the archetypal figure. 

The Witch Institute will present a keynote lecture by Dr. Silvia Federici, along with a series of talks, panel discussions, film screenings, art exhibitions, performances, and workshops occurring over August 16 to 22, 2021. All events will be free, open to the public, and accessible online. Registration opens January 25, 2021.

 

Call for Proposals:

We are seeking round table participants and workshop leaders. We invite proposals from artists, researchers, and practitioners. We encourage a diversity of voices as part of this exchange, and highly encourage submissions from members of marginalized communities, including BIPOC and 2SLBGTQ participants.

Round Tables. We are looking for participants who wish to discuss their research with a group. Each session will include 3-4 artists, researchers, or practitioners. Attendees will read short texts (maximum 5-pages in length) or review documentation of panelists’ work in advance. The sessions will be devoted to 75-minute moderated discussions. 

Workshops. We are seeking proposals for 60-minute interactive virtual sessions. 

We invite proposals that contribute to topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. Witchcraft and Colonization: colonial denigration and erasure of Black or Indigenous spiritual knowledges and practices; reclamation of Black or Indigenous spiritual knowledges, practices, and more-than-human relationalities as anti-colonial resistance or as decolonial projects; cultural evolutions, exchanges, and appropriations among historical and contemporary witch practices. 
  2. Witch Hunts and the State: on-going witch hunts and their interconnected histories of colonization and globalization; witch-hunting as state-sanctioned violence; enforcement of anti-witchcraft legislation in colonial, postcolonial, and settler-colonial nation-states. 
  3. Technology and Magic: traditions of magic, alternative healing practices, and/or spirituality as technology; visual effects, illusions, and magic on screen and stage; technological mediation and the supernatural; technology and the senses; the body and other mediums for spiritual messages.
  4. Witchcraft as Ritual, Practice, and Pedagogy: ritual as a form of learning-by-doing; oral traditions and decolonial practices of knowledge transmission; pedagogical uses of the witch, witchcraft, and/or ritual practices; the perspectives of contemporary practitioners; religious lineages of Wicca and Paganism; intergenerational exchange, kinship, more-than-human relations, and covens; the relationship between witchcraft and feminism.
  5. The Witch as Text: representations of the witch, witchcraft, and spiritual practices in literature, film, music, fashion, art, and popular culture; the commodification of the witch; texts as restoring, or healing the denigration of colonization; shifting perceptions, receptions, and circulations of witchcraft in the context of colonization and globalization.

 

Submissions:

Those interested in participating in the round table or organizing a workshop, please submit:

  • a 250 word abstract of your research or description of your workshop 
  • which of the above topic(s) you see your work fitting into (if applicable)
  • for roundtable submissions: 2 or 3 questions you would like to discuss with a group who will read your paper/look at your artwork in advance;
  • a 150 word bio. 

 

Submissions should be sent to witch.institute@queensu.ca by January 25, 2021.

 

The Witch Institute is committed to accessibility in all phases of the project. If you have any questions or needs concerning this call, please feel free to send Emily Pelstring (she/her) an email at emily.pelstring@queensu.ca.

 

This project has received SSHRC funding. 

 

La version française ci-dessous

23rd Annual Film Studies Association of Canada Graduate Colloquium University of Toronto Cinema Studies Institute
Friday January 29 – Saturday January 30, 2021 (Virtual)
Call for papers: “SPECTRE”

Keynote address by Dr. David Marriott, Penn State University

The year 2020 has been shrouded by the spectre of crises, from the novel coronavirus, to ongoing racial injustice and colonial violence. The impact of this year has sent reverberations through the ways in which we gather, research, think, make and consume art, and indeed, how we survive. The spectral seems to be an apt mode for contemplating the conditions that hover over our times, and that continue to haunt the cinema and its study.

Film scholars have long tracked the ghostliness of the cinematic. For example, Katherine Groo asks us to consider the absence and decay of film and its celluloid im/materiality as a part of its ontology. In Zoological Surrealism, James Cahill attests to the power of film to reanimate the dead, while Canadian scholar Andrew Burke’s recent work looks at how contemporary Canadian film is haunted by traces of the 1970s. The onscreen body, too, persists as a phantasmagoric figure. For Maggie Hennefeld, the spectral encapsulates the transfiguring, miniaturising embodiment of early film comediennes, while Eliza Steinbock calls upon the “shimmer” to envision the illusory, astonishing visibility of both cinema and transgender embodiment. Cinema’s legacy of racial imagery also continues to haunt its image-making practices; in Black Skin, White Masks, Frantz Fanon famously wrote: “I can’t go to the movies without encountering myself. I wait for myself. Just before the film starts, I wait for myself,” a passage taken up by Kara Keeling in her article “In the Interval.” The spectre of film’s racial imaginary also cannot be separated from the continued presence of systemic anti-Black violence, a spectre that is all too real.

Finally, since Derrida conceptualized the neologism “hauntology” in his 1993 Spectres of Marx, many scholars, like those aforementioned and beyond the discipline of media studies, have engaged with spectres. Indeed, this conference also asks, in what ways are we haunted by the spectre of spectre? How is the spectral contained and rendered by filmic practices, or by film’s ontology? How does the spectral inhabit onscreen bodies and map across visions of marginalisation, terror, and violence? What is the cinema continuously haunted by, and how does this haunting rear its head?

Sample topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The paranormal and ghostliness
  • Systemic violence/legacies of violence
  • Im/materiality, un/reality, absence/presence
  • Dis/embodiment
  • Repetition and temporality
  • Memory, trauma, loss, fear, anxiety
  • Surface
  • Derrida/hauntology
  • Legacies of film history and historic film scholarship/methods

Submissions:
Interested graduate students must submit a brief abstract (300 to 500 words) as a .PDF file, in English or French, by Monday, December 7th, 2020, to: 
csgraduatestudentunion@gmail.com.

Submissions should include the following information:

  • Your name
  • Level of study
  • Name of your University
  • Title of your presentation
  • Abstract
  • Short bibliography

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L’année 2020 a été enveloppée par le spectre de différentes crises, du coronavirus aux injustices raciales et violences coloniales. Cette année a des répercussions sur nos façons de nous rassembler, de faire de la recherche, de penser, de faire et de consommer de l’art, et bien sûr, sur nos façons de survivre. Le spectral semble être un mode adéquat pour contempler les conditions qui planent au-dessus de notre époque, et qui continuent à hanter le cinéma et son étude.

Les chercheurs en Études Cinématographiques ont depuis longtemps adressé l’aspect fantomatique du cinématographique. Par exemple, Katherine Groo nous amène à considérer l’absence et la désintégration des films ainsi que l’im/matérialité du celluloïd comme partie intégrante de leur ontologie. Dans Zoological Surrealism, James Cahill affirme le pouvoir filmique de réanimer les morts, alors que le travail récent du chercheur canadien Andrew Burke s’intéresse à la façon dont les films contemporains canadiens sont hantés par les traces des années 70. Le corps filmé persiste lui aussi en tant que figure fantasmagorique. Pour Maggie Hennefeld, le spectral encapsule la corporalité transfigurée et miniaturisée des comédiennes des films des premiers temps, alors que Eliza Steinbock abord la notion de « shimmer » pour explorer l’illusoire et stupéfiante visibilité de la corporalité à la fois cinématographique et transgenre. L’héritage d’imagerie raciale du cinéma continue également de hanter ses pratiques imageantes; on se souvient de ce passage, dans Peau Noire, Masques Blancs, où Frantz Fanon déclare : « Impossible d’aller au cinéma sans me rencontrer. Je m’attends. À l’entracte, juste avant le film, je m’attends », un passage que reprend Kara Keeling dans son article « In the interval. » Le spectre de l’imaginaire racial du cinéma ne peut également se séparer de la présence continuelle de la violence systémique anti-noire, un spectre beaucoup trop réel.

Finalement, depuis que Derrida a conceptualisé le néologisme « hantologie » dans son livre de 1993 Spectres de Marx, plusieurs chercheurs, autant ceux mentionnés qu’au- delà des études médiatiques, ont engagé la notion de spectres. Ainsi, cette conférence demande également de quelle manière nous sommes hantés par le spectre du spectre? Comment le spectral est-il contenu et rendu par l’ontologie et les pratiques filmiques? Comment est-ce que le spectral habite les corps filmés, et comment est-ce qu’il cartographie au travers des imageries de marginalisation, de terreur et de violence? De quoi le cinéma est-il constamment hanté, et quelles sont les nouvelles actualisations de cette hantise?

Les sujets peuvent inclures, mais ne sont pas limités à :

  • Le paranormal et le fantomatique
  • La violence systémique/l’héritage violent
  • L’im/matérialité, l’ir/réalité, l’absence/la présence
  • L’in/corporalité
  • La répétition et la temporalité
  • La mémoire, le traumatisme, la perte, la peur, l’anxiété
  • La surface
  • Derrida/Hantologie
  • L’héritage de l’histoire cinématographique; l’étude et méthode historique

Soumissions :

Les parties intéressées doivent soumettre un bref résumé (de 300 à 500 mots) en .PDF, en anglais ou en français, d’ici le 7 décembre 2020 à l’adresse courrielle suivante : csgraduatestudies@gmail.com

Les soumissions doivent inclure les informations suivantes :

  • Votre nom
  • Niveau de scolarité
  • Institution d’attache
  • Titre de votre présentation
  • Votre résumé
  • Une courte bibliographie

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CFP: 20/21 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada (Abstracts Due: Feb. 1, 2021)

 

August 19-21, 2021
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada

Keynote speakers will be Cherie Dimaline, Governor General’s award-winning author of The Marrow Thieves, and Wayde Compton, author of the award-winning story collection The Outer Harbour.

NOTE: This is a revised and extended call for proposals, directed to participants other than those who were previously accepted to the 2020 conference, which was postponed because of the pandemic. Should we still be unable to meet in person in August, the conference will be converted to an online format. 

In the midst of a global pandemic, the ways that speculative fiction, film, and television comment on the present as well as the future have become acutely evident. These genres ask readers to consider environmental, health, technological, and political events and developments in the world today, and the impacts these may have on the world of the future. They are often used by their creators to represent and speculate on key societal issues, such as relations of class, gender, and race, as well as issues of health safety, environmental destruction, and political conflict. In Canada, speculative writing has become a tool to interrogate colonial enterprises and open up spaces for marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, members of LGBTQ2S+ communities, and others whose lives are inflected by cultural difference. A variety of speculative worlds have achieved popularity through films and television/internet series, some of which are adapted from other genres.

20/21 Vision: Speculating in Literature and Film in Canada invites researchers and creators to present their own speculations about the futures and/or societies that are presented in various texts produced in or relating to Canada. What do speculative texts tell us? Which visions of “Canada” do we find in speculative texts? How do these visions reflect our own perceptions of the world? Does this kind of literary imagination offer space for grief, resilience, and hope? Does it help us respond constructively to crises or achieve social change? 

Proposals for both papers and panels are invited. These can take a range of approaches related to speculative writing in Canada, including: 

·       Speculations on global pandemics and other health crises

·       Environmental and/or technological changes and developments in speculative writing

·       Speculations on language and power

·       Indigenous and decolonizing speculations

·       Gender and sexuality in speculative writing

·       Disability in speculative writing

·       Geographical speculations in the real or virtual world

·       Speculative writing for children

·       Speculative poetry

·       Speculation and interdisciplinarity

·       Dystopian, utopian, and anti-utopian worlds

·       Apocalyptic scenarios and post-apocalyptic futures

·       Speculations on the screen: movies, documentaries, television and internet series, video games

·       Speculative adaptations

·       Speculative creations, including short works of speculative fiction or poetry* 

*The conference will also host sessions in which creators of speculative genres will be invited to present their works. Authors and artists are invited to propose 20-minute creative pieces; these may involve readings from written works, visual installations, performance pieces, or film presentations. 

Proposals should include the following:

1.       Your name, contact information (including email address and telephone number), and institutional affiliation.

2.       The title of your proposed 15- to 20-minute paper or presentation, AND a proposal of 250-300 words, identifying the works that will be your focus of your paper and outlining the argument to be presented OR describing your creative piece and the method of presentation or performance.

3.       A 50-word biographical statement. 

Panel proposals should include the above information for all participants. 

Please e-mail your proposal in a Word document to conference organizers Wendy Roy and Mabiana Camargo of the University of Saskatchewan at 2020vision@usask.ca by February 1, 2021 (extended deadline). 

Additional conference acceptances will be emailed in March, 2021. For further information, please visit the website or send an email to 2020vision@usask.ca

The University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis.