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Call for Proposals:
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FILM STUDIES
REVUE CANADIENNE D’ETUDES CINEMATOGRAPHIQUES 

SPECIAL ISSUE:
CURATING EXPANDED CINEMA IN CANADA
Spring 2018

It has been almost five decades since Gene Youngblood’s groundbreaking book from 1970, Expanded Cinema, opened a new, ‘expanded’ way of looking at moving image culture. Youngblood is generally credited with establishing the field of “media arts,” his thinking encompassing not only film and video as art forms, but new technologies and processes as well, such as computer art, cybernetics, holography, inter-media and mass media, special effects and synaesthetics.  In the past decade, Kate Mondloch’s concept of “screen subjectivity” has emerged to further extend the boundaries of Youngblood’s sense of “expanded cinema” in theory and practice (Screens: Viewing Media Installation Art, 2010), while Jackie Hatfield has also been influential in redefining cinema in the digital era to signify a “wide-ranging historical and philosophical discourse,” rather than “film” per se. “A cinematic configuration,” she writes, could involve inter-media, performance, spectacle, video, art and technology in addition to film, and could be located within the ‘black box’ of the theatre or the ‘white cube’ of the gallery (Expanded Cinema: Art, Performance, Film, Ed. A.L. Rees, 2011, 262).  In addition, while Janine Marchessault and Susan Lord have explored this explosion of the screen outward, “toward immersive, interactive, interconnected forms of culture” (Fluid Screens, Expanded Cinema, 2007, 7) from a uniquely Canadian perspective, the Canadian Journal of Film Studies/Revue Canadienne d’études cinématographiques, has itself also produced a dossier of four articles on expanded screens on such topics as home video, video arcades and iphone cultures (20:2, 2011).

In furthering this important work in the Canadian context, this special issue of CJFS/RCDC wishes to focus with particular emphasis on the intersections between art and film across our expanded screen cultures.  As Andrew Uroskie has observed, as the moving image “enters and transforms the space of contemporary art,” its now “heterogeneous and often ambivalent location” in the gallery and beyond is an issue at the forefront for leading screen scholars, curators, and immersive installation artists (Screen/Space: The Projected Image in Contemporary Art, Ed. Tamara Trodd, 2001, 145).

This special issue, “Curating Expanded Cinema in Canada,” invites papers which examine and elucidate, from coast to coast to coast, the flow of images across platforms, screens and spaces as they deconstruct traditional cinema into its component elements (light, sound, image, performance, etc.), reconfigure the screen in the gallery and beyond (in installations, at festivals, in urban public spaces, on heritage buildings and sites, in landscapes, etc.) and immerse audiences in new relationships of “presence with the image” (Jan Holmberg, Cinemas: Journal of Film Studies, 14:1, 2003, 129).  Topics could include leading Canadian artists working in the field of expanded cinema/expanded screens/screen subjectivities (such as Janet Cardiff, Dana Claxton, Stan Douglas, Atom Egoyan, Kent Monkman, among others); emerging and alternative Canadian artists whose work embodies these thematics;  and ongoing work in local to national curatorial projects and events, large or small, across Canada (such as nuit blanches, individual or collaborative programs and activities), whether contemporary or historical.

Scholars and curators are strongly encouraged to include visual support materials with their contributions, while artists are strongly encouraged to frame and contextualize their contributions with academic concepts and analysis. 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

a) Proposals:

Please email proposals of 300 to 500 words, including a 100 to 150 word bio, to the Special Issue Editor: Christine.Ramsay@uregina.ca
http://www.uregina.ca/mediaartperformance/faculty-staff/faculty/f-ramsay-christine.html

Deadline: October 15, 2016

The Special Issue Editor will reply with acceptances by October 30, 2016. 

b) Essays:

If your proposal is accepted to go forward, please follow these parameters:

  • Papers should be 5000 to 6250 words in length (20-25 pages) in either English or French. 
  • Double-space throughout, including indented quotations and endnotes.  Pages should be numbered. The author’s name should appear only on a separate title page.  Citations should be placed in automated endnotes in the format recommended in the Chicago Manual of Style. Submissions, accompanied by a 100-150 word abstract and brief bio should be sent as email attachments in MS Word to: Christine.Ramsay@uregina.ca

 

Deadline: May 1, 2017

Please include any images separately, as well as embedded in the submission, as high-resolution (300-dpi) files. Label them as consecutive figures (in the style of: Fig. 1: Caption) and include caption and full credit. It is the responsibility of authors to obtain image permissions and copyright.

NOTE:

Papers will be reviewed by the Special Issue Editor, and then individually double-blind reviewed by readers through the standard review process of the Editorial Board of the Canadian Journal of Film Studies/Revue Canadienne d’études cinématographiques.

For further information about CJFS/RCDC, see:
http://www.filmstudies.ca/journal/

For further information about CJFS/RCDC Guidelines for Final Copy, see:
http://www.filmstudies.ca/journal/cjfs/contribute/final_copy

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Cinema and Technologies of Movement
SYNOPTIQUE Issue Vol. 5, no. 2
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: May 15, 2016
Click here for the CFP 

APPEL À CONTRIBUTIONS: Technologies du Mouvement au Cinéma
SYNOPTIQUE Volume 5, numéro 2
DATE DE TOMBÉE: 15 MAI 2016
Cliquez ici pour accéder au CFP

 

Gods & Heretics: The 2016 Film & History Conference

CFP: Transgressive Filmmakers and Their Films

DEADLINE for abstracts: June 1, 2016

Link to website

Cinematic transgression is about directors challenging or overcoming the status quo in their films, most often through shock and shlock to wake slumbering viewers with (sometimes hidden) social commentary. While each generation has spawned new notions or means of transgression in film, some have remained constant: sex, violence, gore, sacrilege, drugs, race, gender performance, etc. These films frequently are made by a director who is also an embodiment of transgression, whether or not they work within the mainstream system.

How have our constructions of cinematic taboos and transgressions shifted over time, and how do these influence the wider culture? When and how do cinematic transgressors become cinematic (or cultural) heroes and icons? Can a member of the status quo create transgressive work if the product is from their imagination or under their creative control?

This area invites papers that explore contemporary directors (considered, or who could be considered, transgressive), their films, and the ways in which transgression is portrayed (both as a director and their films). Possible themes and topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Portrayals of sexuality
  • Gore, splatter flicks, “roughies,” and exploitation
  • Gender expression and identity
  • Technical elements, including setting, scenery, costuming, etc., and transgression
  • Transgressive directors and the influence on their movies
  • Comedy as a safe exploration of the transgressive
  • Heteronormative directors challenging the status quo
  • The (un)identified threat in the status quo
  • John Waters, David Lynch, Dennis Hopper, Quentin Tarantino, Roger Corman, Ken Russell, and other transgressive figures
  • From transgression to mainstream and back: selling out and going off the rails

Proposals for complete panels (three related presentations) are also welcome, but they must include an abstract and contact information, including an e-mail address, for each presenter. For updates and registration information about the upcoming meeting, see the Film & History website (www.filmandhistory.org).
Please e-mail your 200-word proposal by June 1, 2016, to the area chair:

Michelle Martinez
Associate Professor, Sam Houston State University
mmartinez@shsu.edu

 

Coming to Terms with Film-Philosophy

Conference plus Special Event and Masterclass with Alain Badiou

York University and TIFF
Toronto, Canada
May 16-17, 2016

Although it has established itself as a sub-discipline or hybrid of film and philosophy in various European formations, film-philosophy is relatively new to North American cinema and media studies. As one of the first in North America to nominate itself under its auspices, this conference explores the mobilization of philosophical discourses and projects relative to the modern event of cinema. More specifically, we seek papers that address the origins of film-philosophy, in addition to its current manifestations and future potentialities.

A highlight of this conference is the “Special Event: Onstage Conversation with Alain Badiou” co-presented with TIFF. Badiou, who has been called the most important philosopher since Gilles Deleuze, is the author of numerous books and articles that have helped define the major questions and contours of philosophy in the 20th and 21st centuries. He has taught at the École normale supérieure and the Collège international de philosophie in Paris, as well as the European Graduate School. In addition to his major philosophical works Being and Event and Logics of Worlds, his recent books translated into English include The Age of the Poets, Controversies: Politics and Philosophy in our Time,Cinema, The Communist Hypothesis, and Wittgenstein’s Anti-Philosophy.

In this onstage conversation moderated by Professor Ian Balfour of York University, Badiou will speak about cinema, the recent events in Paris, and the role that philosophy can play in helping us understand and act in this historic context, accompanied by film clips that will bring further dimensions to some of the discussion’s central themes. In addition, there is a Masterclass with Badiou, where conference presenters will have an exclusive opportunity to further explore the intersections of film and philosophy.

Some of the questions that inform this conference pertain to the concepts and formations within film-philosophy relative to broader discourses and practices in the humanities and beyond. For example: What are the terms that film-philosophy deploys as it stands today? What are the stakes of film-philosophy that it asks of itself in terms of its own legitimization and what is expected of it by the broader discipline of cinema and media studies? What transformations and problems in cinema and media studies does film-philosophy respond to, interrogate, and/or (re)conceptualize?

We seek papers that:

  • historicize and (re)conceptualize the emergence of film-philosophy and/or problematize it as a discipline or approach;
  • situate film-philosophy relative to trends and developments in film and cultural theory, contemporary media studies, new media, and other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences;
  • define and interrogate the concepts of film-philosophy (such as those taken from, for example, phenomenology, deconstruction, or Marxism);
  • ask about the stakes of major contemporary philosophers (Badiou, Deleuze, Cavell, etc.) who engage with cinema as a philosophical model, a problematic field, and/or a set of texts and examples for philosophical speculation;
  • discuss film-philosophy’s stance relative to debates in contemporary developments in queer theory, critical race theory, postcolonial theory, disability studies, environmental studies, and/or animal studies;
  • enact film-philosophy in the engagement of cinematic texts and objects;
  • examine the relationship between the “filmic” (cinematic, visual, temporal, aesthetic) and the “textual” (discursive, written, etc.);
  • explore the politics of film-philosophy, such as the relationship between democracy and film (Badiou, Rancière, etc.) or cinematic ethics (Levinas, Nancy, etc.);
  • map out the contours and terrain of film-philosophy and world cinema(s) (global film-philosophy);
  • consider the relationship between film-philosophy and new trends in philosophy in general, including speculative realism, new materialism, anti-philosophy, and non-philosophy;
  • conceptualize cinematic ethics, metaphysics, ontology, and/or epistemology in light of recent developments in film-philosophy

We also welcome papers that deal with the work of contemporary film theorists who engage with intersections between film and philosophy; for example, Vivian Sobchack, Patricia Pisters, D.N. Rodowick, Noel Carroll, Joan Copjec, Laura Marks, Hito Steyerl, or Steven Shaviro. We also invite filmmakers and media practitioners to present and discuss their work in a film-philosophical context.

“Coming to Terms with Film-Philosophy” will be held in Toronto, Canada May 16-17, 2016.

Please send a 300 word abstract, brief bibliography, and bio (with institutional affiliation, if applicable) as email attachments to yorkfilmphilosophy@gmail.com by Friday, April 1, 2016. Notifications about acceptance or rejection of proposal will be sent on Monday, April 4.

Conference and Masterclass Registration Fees:

Conference Attendance: $100
Masterclass: $50

Graduate Students and Underemployed:
Conference Attendance: $50
Masterclass: $25

*Masterclass reserved for conference presenters only.

Special Event: Onstage Conversation with Alain Badiou
Monday, May 16 7:00pm at TIFF Bell Lightbox
Adult: $13
Student/Senior: $10.50

NOTE: Special Event: Onstage Conversation with Alain Badiou is free for conference participants.

Conference website: https://yorkfilmphilosphy.wordpress.com/

Organized by the graduate students of Cinema and Media Studies, York University, in partnership with TIFF.

 

Verging: Technologies/Practices/Aesthetics in Contemporary Documentary
Two-day Symposium (March 18th – 19th), Downtown Toronto

Keynote Speaker: Jonathan Harris (Network Effect & number27) 

The PhD program in Cinema and Media Studies at York University, Toronto, in conjunction with the Department of Cinema and Media Arts’ Future Documentary Lab, welcomes papers and panels discussing the current landscape and changing language of documentary practices across technologies, aesthetics, and audiences. We invite scholars, practitioners, curators and media workers to present. The Symposium intends to interrogate the evolution of documentary in our wired and digital world. We will gather work from traditional documentary, across interactive storytelling, and through augmented and virtual realities. We will ask how and if commercial, artistic, activist, and educational practitioners can and are working together. 

Jonathan Harris is an award winning interactive artist and computer scientist, known for his work with data poetics and storytelling. The co-creator of We Feel Fine, the director of The Whale HuntI Love Your Work, among many others, Harris’s works have redefined documentary storytelling in the digital age. The winner of three Webby awards, his work has also been recognized by AIGA and Ars Electronica. 

The conference organizers welcome, and highly encourage, individual papers, panel suggestions, and alternative presentation formats (workshops and demonstrations) across all disciplines related to the conference theme and to the keynote speakers’ research. Presentations will be 20 minutes in length. 

POSSIBLE THEMES INCLUDE [not limited to]:

  • Projection spaces and/or spaces onscreen; questions of installation
  • Cross-disciplinary use of virtual reality (i.e., sciences, medicine, artillery technologies) in artistic and cross-artistic practice (i.e., fine arts, dance, theatre)
  • Classical narrative storytelling vs. non-representational forms
  • Temporality and spatiality
  • Questions of distribution: How do you exhibit for a collective audience? Influence/responsibility of private and/or public funding
  • Historical events’ effects on the cultural & aesthetic standards of documentary practice
  • The praxis and ethics of documenting refugees across borders
  • Addressing the demarcation between documentary filmmaking practices and pedagogy
  • Pedagogical uses, potentials, complexities of VR and/or interactive  

Submissions must be sent by Friday, February 19th by 5PM to verging2016@gmail.com, with the required subject line “Proposal [last name] [first name]”. 

Please send the following:

  • An abstract (.pdf format) of no more than 300 words (introducing your research objectives, theoretical framework, and methodology)
  • A brief bio of 100 words. Be sure to state your name and affiliation
  • Please include a working title and partial bibliography of 2-3 sources
  • List equipment needed, if necessary 

Notification of accepted abstracts/panels will be sent by Friday, February 26th. For further inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact: verging2016@gmail.com.

See PDF for more information.

French papers welcomed.

 

Call for Expressions of Interest (EOI)

Ecocinema and Water

Under Western Skies
Water: Events, Trends, Analysis 

Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

September 27 – 30, 2016

This panel invites papers on ecocinema that are in some way connected to water.  Under Western Skies is an interdisciplinary, biennial conference whose past keynote speakers have included Adrian Ivakhiv, Bron Taylor, Vandana Shiva, Donald Worster, Richard Whyte, Patty Limerick, and Gary Paul Nabhan.

See http://skies.mtroyal.ca/

Please submit proposals to mtrono@mtroyal.ca no later than January 31st, 2016, although general inquiries are welcome at any time.

 

Reel Limits: (Re)Conceptualizing Cinematic Space, Bodies and Landscape

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: KAY DICKINSON
Associate Professor, Concordia University

CONFERENCE DATES: MARCH 11 & 12, CARLETON UNIVERSITY, OTTAWA

Rapidly evolving technologies and postmodern conceptions of media have made the definition of cinematic space difficult to articulate. This conference will address this quandary by looking at the differences between what is new, what is the same, and the current fluidity of cinema. Inspired by the changing dynamics in the discourse of cinema, we are looking to reevaluate the cinematic by considering what all cinematic space and the material objects that comprise that space might encompass.

Specific topics might include but are not limited to:

  • The relationship between people and lived spaces.
  • New conceptions of bodies and landscape, possibly due to queer theory or “ecocriticism.”
  • Technological affect within filmic worlds.
  • The affect of specific cultural and temporal milieus on clusters of films and filmmakers.
  • The interdependence of filmmakers and institutions such as film industries and festivals.
  • The changing interface of cinema due to the emergence of cross-platform media.

Proposals should include a 300 word abstract, a working title, name and institutional affiliation, a working bibliography of 2-3 sources.

Please email proposals to reellimitsconference2015@gmail.com by December 14, 2015.

Students of Film Studies and all disciplines are invited to submit proposals and share their research at this conference.

 

Projections : Rendre publiques les études cinématographique
Appel à participation – « Non-colloque » pour étudiants des cycles supérieurs
Du jeudi au samedi, 18-20 février 2016 – Universités Ryerson et York, Toronto
Postuler à gradcolloquium@filmstudies.ca au plus tard le vendredi, 21 décembre 2015.
Cliquez ici pour accéder au CFP (PDF). 

Projections: Making Film Studies Public
Graduate “Un-Colloquium”
Thursday to Saturday, 18-20 February 2016
Ryerson and York Universities, Toronto
Submit to gradcolloquium@filmstudies.ca by Friday, December 21, 2015.
Click here for the CFP (PDF).

 

 

We are now accepting proposals for the 2016 edition of the FSAC/ACÉC annual conference, to be held May 31 – June 2 at the University of Calgary. Submission deadline: Dec. 18, 2015.

Click here for the CFP (DOCX).

Cliquez ici pour accéder au CFP (DOCX).

Please submit to conference2016@filmstudies.ca

 

 

CFP: Screening Characters

Proposals are invited for a new anthology on characters in film, TV, and interactive media to be edited by Johannes Riis (University of Copenhagen) and Aaron Taylor (University of Lethbridge).

Deadline for proposals is Dec. 31, 2015.

Click here for the full poster (PDF).